Quantcast
Help Me Move My Pet

Understanding Summer Pet Travel Embargoes

Monday, March 30, 2015 by Pet Travel Center Questions

Name: Brenda
From: Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA
To: Lima, Peru
Pet: A miniature/medium size poodle; 4 years old; around 7 kg

Hi PetRelocation,
 
I would like to know what the best month/season is to bring my poodle to Florida. Also, is there is any airline that will allow her to travel with me in the cabin? If not, what airlines treat pets well while they are not in cabin?

I wanted to bring her to the United States in 2012 and everything was set, but when we were checking in the guy that was attending me told me the weather was too hot in Florida during that season (it was August or July) -- was she not allowed because Lima was too cold and the change of climate could make her sick when she arrived?

She is used to traveling 2-3 hours in the car.
 
Thanks,
Brenda
 
 
Hi Brenda,
 
Thanks for your question! Many airlines operate with summer embargoes instated with a pet's safety and comfort in mind, so it's a good idea to research these restrictions well in advance in order to avoid scheduling problems. Please take a look at some of last year's embargoes for an idea of how they often work, and we recommend checking with airlines directly to find out what their summer restrictions might be for this year. Often summer airline embargoes primarily concern snub-nosed breeds, so your poodle might not be affected.
 
Your dog will most likely need to travel in the cargo area of the plane, and we recommend choosing a pet-friendly airline such as United. The more pet-friendly an airline is the less of an issue temperature should be (United has air-conditioned vehicles to transport pets to the plane, for example).
 
This is good advice any time, but when traveling during the summer months we recommend making extra sure your dog is well-hydrated and also crate-trained, as these factors make air cargo travel more comfortable and less stressful for the pet.
 
If you think you'd like some assistance and would like to find out more about our door-to-door services, please fill out our online consultation form. Either way, good luck with everything and thanks again for reaching out!

Cargo Pet Travel to Canada (With an Older Dog)

Friday, March 20, 2015 by Pet Travel Center Questions

Name: Sheeba
From: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
To: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Pet: Jenny (Fox Terrier and Lhasa Apso Cross breed, 9 yrs, 8 kg)

Hi PetRelocation,
 
Can my dog travel with me in cabin? If so, please do recommend an airline for me to travel along with my dog from Chennai, TN, India to Toronto, ON, Canada.
 
Also provide me with the list of requirements according to Canadian Food Inspection Agency. I haven't maintained the vaccination card though my dog has had regular vaccinations. Can I provide the No Objection Certificate alone? I also don't feel comfortable with my dog travelling in cargo since she is already 9 years old.

Thanks,
Sheeba
 
 
Hi Sheeba,
 
Thanks for contacting us with your question! You'll find the best and most comprehensive information about moving pets to Canada on the official Canada government website. The instructions for bringing your dog from India are outlined here; as you'll see, you need to have proof of an up-to-date rabies vaccine in the form of a Rabies Vaccination Certificate. There is currently no quarantine.
 
If you fly on a commercial airline your dog will need to travel via cargo, as she is too large to go in the cabin (even if she was small enough, many airlines don't allow in-cabin pet travel for international routes). We certainly understand that you feel fearful about pet cargo travel, but under the right circumstances this is a very safe undertaking. Please read over this pet travel advice to find out more.
 
Also, we'd like to direct you to this information about how to fly an older pet safely. There are a few extra considerations you can attend to in order to help your 9-year-old pup handle the trip as well as possible.
 
Hopefully this helps, Sheeba! Please contact us for a consultation if you need further assistance, and good luck with everything.

Employee Profile: Joe, PetRelocation Corporate Account Manager

Wednesday, March 11, 2015 by Core Values

joeBy Kelley Barnes, Director of HR

If you have a ‘Joe Fraser type’ in your company, then you know how lucky you are.

What do I mean by that – a ‘Joe Fraser type’? In this case, it means to have that outgoing, social personality who also has the uncanny ability to get things done. In the offices of PetRelocation, in addition to being the point of contact for a number of our corporate accounts, Joe is the driving force behind our well-attended, regular monthly outings to experience Austin culture and fun. (Of course it doesn’t hurt that our offices are one block over from Austin’s legendary Sixth Street Entertainment District).

Joe is someone we can always rely on to have a smile on his face and to generally rally the troops when a cheerleader is needed. It’s clear he draws on his skills in Improv and Comedy on a daily basis. It’s also no accident that he sits next to the office gong.

For Joe and the other members of our Corporate Accounts team, the end of February is the start of high season. More and more requests will come to us for clients who are being moved around the world by their companies during the start of summer as they plan ahead for the big life change.

Before things get hectic for Joe, he was able to take a few minutes to answer the profile questions below. I hope his answers will bring a smile to your face as they did to mine.

Why did you decide to apply to PetRelocation initially?

I applied for the Sales Consultant role right before I got married in 2011. At that time, I was managing a Segway tour company in downtown Austin. While it was one of the most fun jobs I had ever had, it didn’t provide me the means to provide my soon-to-be wife the life that she needed. So I was searching for a “cool job” that paid more than the Segway job and also had benefits. When I found PetRelocation, everything just fell into place. February 1, 2015 marked my 3-year anniversary with the company.

What’s your first memory of working at PetRelocation?

My first memory of PetRelocation in general is when I interviewed for the job and had to give the presentation. I was so nervous that I showed up for the interview 1.5 hours early, so I sat in my car and gave the presentation to my steering wheel for an hour. It ended up paying off because the presentation went very well. After I finished, the CEO told me that I basically got the job. So when I left the office, I did Kung Fu kicks all the way to my car. Little did I know, all of the windows on the building face the street that I kicked my way down…

 

joe's dogs

Joe's dogs Django & Gypsy

What’s your favorite client story?

My favorite client story was when I moved a Ball Python named Jesus for a corporate client. I was nervous throughout the entire process because snakes are so sensitive. I was afraid that something would go wrong and I would be “the guy who lost Jesus.” Fortunately, the move went off without a hitch and Jesus was safely reunited with his family.

What was your most challenging move/client?

My most challenging move to date was for a 13-year old epileptic Yellow Lab from the US to the Dominican Republic. The dog was so large that she required a custom travel crate in order to meet international airline standards. The size of kennel required ended up being too large to fit on any standard commercial aircraft that serviced Santo Domingo. The result is that we had to drive the dog to Miami and take a cargo flight to Santo Domingo before driving 3 hours to the client’s home. Fortunately, all went well and Molly is now home safe with her family!

You started as a Sales Consultant and moved into Corporate Accounts. What is different about the two roles?

The difference between the consulting role and managing accounts really comes down to the types of clients you are dealing with. When working with clients on the web, anyone can “walk into our store” and request service. These clients come from all types of situations, backgrounds and locations, which always kept me guessing before each call. When managing the accounts, we are typically dealing with high-level corporate executives, HR professionals and 3rd party relocation companies. So in the corporate business, I must be accountable to two or more parties for each move and there are no set “regions” of the world that I work with. But I love that account management keeps me on my toes!

What do you think will change about pet travel in the next five years?

I think that the major changes in pet travel in the next five years will come from the airlines and government organizations of the world. The western attitude towards pets is rapidly spreading to countries all over the world and more people are moving pets internationally than ever. I believe this will spur more and more airlines to implement pet safe programs so as to cash in on this industry trend. I also believe that the governing bodies of the world will begin working to standardize import requirements across the world. This will allow pets to travel more freely by streamlining airline and country import requirements.

Emily & Joe

Joe and his wife Emily

What do you wish other people knew about the company?

I wish people knew what a small group that we are. From the outside looking in, we look like a multi-million dollar corporation that moves an unfathomable amount of pets around the world. In reality, we are 30 committed pet-shipping professionals changing peoples’ lives in a way that has never been done before.

What’s your best hidden talent?

My best hidden talent is my skill at singing R&B karaoke. I love getting up on stage, pretending to be nervous and watching people immediately assume that I am going to sing country music or be a poor performer. Then Brian McKnight kicks on and I blow their expectations out of the water. #KaraokeSwag

What do you like to do when you aren’t working?

When I’m not working, I like to spend time with my wife and two little Chihuahuas. During the warmer months here in Texas, you can find us floating the river, diving into Central Texas’ many swimming holes and attending the endless number of festivals in the Austin area. From SXSW to The Texas Renaissance festival, from Carnaval Brasileiro to the X Games, we do it all and enjoy the Austin lifestyle to the fullest.

What was the last book you read for fun? What did you enjoy about it?

The last book I read was Clive Barker’s Coldheart Canyon. I am a lover of everything Horror (movies, books, etc.), so Clive Barker and I are old buddies. I love the imagery he uses to paint a picture in my mind of the hellish nightmares in his novels.

Hollywood wants to make a movie about your life. Who do they cast to play you?

Hugh Jackman... obviously. :)

 

Read more about Joe and the rest of the PetRelocation team here. Want to work at PetRelocation? Take a look at our current open positions.

Tips for Traveling Safely with Aggressive Dogs

Monday, March 9, 2015 by Pet Travel Center Questions

Name: Judy
From: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
To: Sydney, Australia
Pet: Casper (Pekingese, male, 5 years old, 13kg)

Hi PetRelocation,
 
We have moved to Australia and are eager to now bring our pet Pekingese here. How safe will it be for him to travel in cargo for the entire flight of around 9 hours? Which airlines can we use, as Malaysian Airlines do not take snub-nosed dogs? Also, he is aggressive to strangers and other dogs -- will this be an issue?
 
We appreciate your kind assistance and thank you in advance.
 
Regards,
Judy

 
Hi Judy,
 
Thanks, these are all great questions! First, please review the pet import procedure for bringing pets to Australia -- the official government website offers a tool to help you build a timeline and learn about quarantine facilities, etc. Note that there is a minimum 10-day quarantine required for all pets entering Australia.
 
As far as airlines, we often use Qantas for pets traveling between Malaysia and Australia. You're welcome to contact us to speak to a Specialist if you'd like to discuss your options further and find out more about what constitutes a pet-friendly airline.
 
Though cargo pet travel does sound a little scary at first, with a little research you'll see that it's actually very safe when the right steps are taken to minimize risks. Crate-training your dog is extremely important, as is proper hydration, choosing a pet-friendly airline, and discussing any health concerns you have with a vet.
 
For dogs with aggression issues, we suggest labeling the travel crate with a note explaining that Casper is wary of strangers. During the travel process only trained professionals will be handling him so his personality quirks should not preclude him from completing a safe flight, but it helps to do as much as you can to notify everyone involved.
 
Again, you're welcome to fill out our online consultation form if you'd like to discuss your move options with one of our Specialists. We've helped many pets (including ones with aggression issues) relocate safely internationally, and we'd be happy to help you, too.
 
Either way, good luck with everything and thanks again for reaching out!
 

Pet-Friendly Airlines & Dog Travel to Italy

Thursday, March 5, 2015 by Pet Travel Center Questions

Name: Tom
From: Boston, MA USA
To: Florence, Italy
Pet: Spaniel (41 pounds, 5 years old)

Dear PetRelocation,
 
Is there a recommended airline or airlines for taking my dog from Boston, MA USA to Florence, Italy (one better than another)?

Thanks,
Tom
 
 
Hi Tom,
 
Great question! We do have a few select airlines that we choose to work with when moving our clients' pets -- some carriers simply devote more energy towards making sure pets have safe and uneventful moves.
 
Generally speaking, airlines we consider to be "pet-friendly" have knowledgeable employees who are dedicated to a pet's safety. Pets should be kept in temperature-controlled environments as much as possible and should be loaded last and removed first from the cargo area of the plane (which is also temperature and pressure controlled).
 
We typically use Lufthansa, KLM, United and British Airways for our pet flights, and going to Italy in particular we often use Lufthansa. Please read more about the basics of pet travel on our blog to find out additional tips and advice about relocating a pet internationally. Finally, here are the pet import requirements for Italy if you've yet to come across them.
 
Hopefully this information is helpful, Tom! You're welcome to fill out our online consultation form if you'd like to discuss your move options with us. Good luck!
 

Dog Travel to the United States from Canada

Thursday, February 12, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Soleil
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Puppy
Pet Breed: Chocolate Labrador
From: Quebec, Canada
To: Houston, Texas

 

Hi PetRelocation,

My dog just had puppies and my uncle is living in the states and he wants one. We are just curious about some of the requirements needed to have the puppy transferred from Canada to the States. What are the fees involved?

If there is any special way of handling this? If you can give me the best information on this it would be very much appreciated.

Thanks,

Soleil


Hi Soleil,

Thank you for reaching out with a question! We'd be happy to offer some assistance. Please begin by looking over the pet import requirements for the United States. The dog will need to have a vet health certificate stating he/she is healthy and fit to fly (this is what the airline requires) as well as an up-to-date rabies vaccine. We recommend that dogs be at least 16 weeks old before they travel by air.

Please take a look at these essential pet travel tips for more information about the basic process. As you'll see, crate-training and choosing a pet-friendly airline are very important parts of planning a smooth relocation. You'll also need to make sure the travel crate is the correct size and airline-approved. If you have questions about flying an unaccompanied dog via cargo, please read more about it here.

If you think you'd like some assistance, please fill out our consultation form. We've organized thousands of safe pet moves and would be glad to help you, as well.

When to Hire Professional Assistance with a Pet Move

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Alexander
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Cat
Pet Breed: Fluffy
From: Oklahoma City, OK
To: San Diego, CA

 

Dear PetRelocation,

My fiancé and I are getting married and we'll be moving her and her cat to San Diego. I'm checking out the options and whether or not it would be easier to use a pet transport service or just fly back with her cat. How does your business handle the pet being transported?

Thanks,

Alexander

 

Hi Alexander,

Excellent question. Most of the time it's technically possible for pet owners to move pets on their own, but since the process can require a considerable amount of effort (and often stress), some people choose to hire the help of professionals so that they'll have more time to focus on other things (such as moving their own belongings, etc). Here are a few more reasons people choose to hire help.

A domestic cat move is not as complicated as moving a large dog internationally, for example, but you might still find that enlisting pet travel experts to handle the move could be a good solution. PetRelocation arranges door-to-door travel services and helps oversee the gathering of pre-export paperwork, the right travel crate and the plane ticket. We move our clients' pets via cargo on a pet-friendly airline, making it easier for the owners to plan and carry out their own trip.

Please take a look at some of our recent customer stories to find out more about what we do, and it might be helpful to read over these commonly asked pet travel questions, as well.

You may ultimately decide to carry your cat in the cabin with you or plan the cargo trip on your own, but if you're seeking additional assistance you're welcome to contact us for a consultation.

Hope this helps! Congratulations on your upcoming marriage, and please let us know if we can answer any further questions.
 

What to Know about Puppy Travel

Tuesday, February 3, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Jackie
From: Denmark
To: St. Louis, MO
Pet: Alaskan Malamute puppy, around 25 pounds

Dear PetRelocation,

I am thinking of buying a puppy that is in Denmark. I have no clue how much shipping will cost. Just a ball park figure is fine. I'm not even where in Denmark the pup is located... I just wanted to know about total cost before I even get serious and bothered the breeder. She'll be an 8 or 9-week-old puppy.

Thanks,

Jackie

 

Hi Jackie,

Thanks for your question. It typically costs a few hundred dollars to move a small pet internationally; our door-to-door services can amount to $3500 or more for a relocation like this. Your specific costs will depend on a few factors, such as the exact points of departure and arrival, whether the dog flies in the cabin or in the cargo area, etc.

You can start to calculate those costs by adding up the dog's airfare, travel crate, pre-export paperwork, and associated vet visits and transportation costs to and possibly from the airport. The more help you enlist and the less you do on your own, the more expensive it will be.

Now, we can't help but mention the fact that pet scams are very common these days. You may be dealing with a reputable breeder, but no matter what it's important to use caution when dealing with someone you don't really know. Please read more about puppy scams to educate yourself about the warning signs and ensure that you won't fall for any dishonest tactics.

Another thing to think about: PetRelocation does not move pets younger than the age of 16 weeks. At four months they can receive all vaccines and are more physically prepared to withstand the rigors of travel, and moving a puppy younger than this requires extra care and attention and includes some amount of risk.

Please feel free to contact us if you have any further questions about these topics, and good luck with everything!

Dog Travel to Tunisia

Monday, February 2, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Crissy
From: United Kingdom
To: Tunisia
Pets: Chihuahua Mixes (5)

Hi PetRelocation,

How much would it cost to transport my five dogs to Tunisia? They typically sleep together in one crate -- would they be able to travel this way?

Thanks,

Crissy

 

Hi Crissy,

Thanks for submitting your pet travel question to us! When preparing to relocate with pets internationally, it's a good idea to check with the Ministry of Agriculture of the country to which you'll be moving to find out about the most up-to-date pet import rules (usually a health certificate and proof of updated rabies vaccine are required). You can also find out a little about Tunisia pet import rules here.

We'd also like to suggest taking a look at these essential pet travel tips and, when researching airline options, choose one with pet-friendly policies if possible. It's likely your dogs will each have to travel in their own airline-approved travel crate in the cargo area of the plane, so it's important to acclimate them to their crates in the weeks before you move (this makes it a less stressful and overall more smooth experience for all involved).

In terms of costs, our door-to-door services typically start at around $3500 to move one small pet internationally. You're welcome to contact us to discuss your options, or if you'd like to explore alternate and possibly less expensive solutions, we recommend searching for local agents through IPATA.org.

Hope this helps to get you started! Just let us know if you think we can be of further assistance, and good luck with everything.

Flying Internationally with Restricted Dog Breeds

Friday, January 30, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Biggie
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Pit Bull mix (though hasn't had DNA testing)
From: Chicago, USA
To: Bulgaria

 

Hi,

I've been researching individual airline guidelines for transporting dogs, and have found that the restricted breeds are often subtitled "brachycephalic or snub-nosed breeds," which I thought referred to dogs such as pugs and English Bulldogs. However, pure bred or any mixed breeds of Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers are listed in the restricted breeds, as well. Is this because they are considered brachycephalic/snub-nosed, or is it an additional/unrelated issue? I am considering a move to Europe and will not move without my dog, but also do not want to take any extra risks if it is a greater health hazard for his breed to fly.

Additionally, I was unclear whether dogs transported in the cargo compartment can be flown in the crates that are metal only, or are you supposed to use the carriers that are plastic enclosures with metal doors? My dog is well behaved in his normal metal crate where he can easily see out, but is often anxious and frightened inside of a plastic crate with the limited number of slits.

Thanks for your help!

 

Hello,

Thanks for the question, we'd be happy to offer some guidance. Breeds such as Pit Bulls and Staffordshire Terriers are often listed as "restricted" because of historic breed bans rather than health issues. Though you'll find plenty of evidence to support the fact that these breeds are no more dangerous than any other (as we're sure you already know), their size, appearance and possible strength still dictates the policies of many countries and airlines.

We often refer to breed-specific legislation resources online when helping our clients plan out international moves, as some countries do not allow certain breeds to be imported. For example, we helped a dog named Stan move to the Netherlands in 2013 when his owner found out that he wouldn't be able to go to Denmark, where Pit Bulls are banned. Advance planning and creative solutions might be necessary for your move, as well, so it's great that you're starting the process now.

As far as travel crates, this is up to the airline. United (an airline we often choose to fly with) requires that Pit Bulls and a few other breeds travel in reinforced crates meeting IATA Container Requirement #82. KLM, Lufthansa and British Airways are also airlines that we typically select, so we recommend researching the current rules and procedures of these carriers when planning your dog's move.

We also recommend contacting the Ministry of Agriculture in Bulgaria as well as any local authorities and vets who may be able to shed light on how Pit Bulls are regulated (if at all) there. Every country is different, and it's best to learn as much as you can about laws and cultural attitudes before you go.

Hopefully this helps! Just let us know if you think you'd like some help arranging this move (you can fill out our online consultation form), and good luck with everything.

Planning Safe Pet Travel for a 10-Year-Old Dog

Tuesday, January 27, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Duda
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Cockapoo
From: Toronto, Canada
To: Guatemala City, Guatemala

 

Hello,

I am moving to Guatemala this summer for a job and I am bringing my dog with me. He is 10 and I am a bit worried about his age when flying. Will this be a problem? Cockapoos do tend to live longer, so this isn't really as as old as if he were another breed.

Is there an alternative to shipping him in a regular cargo area on the plane? I am worried about their temperature restrictions since we are traveling in the summer and have to stop over in Houston or San Salvador.

Thank you!

Duda

 

Hi Duda,

Thanks for submitting a question to us! Before traveling with an older pet, we recommend discussing any concerns you have with your vet and also reading over these travel tips for older dogs. We've helped many dogs and cats 10 years old and older move safely, and with the right preparation and care, it is most likely a possibility for you, too.

As far as air travel, we recommend choosing a pet-friendly airline (we often use United, KLM and Lufthansa due to their pet safe policies, for example). Airlines with solid pet procedures in place are less affected by temperature, however in the heat of the summer it's possible that you'll run into various embargoes. Since the rules and ports at which they apply change each year, we recommend checking directly with the airline to find out more.

You're also welcome to fill out our consultation form to hear back from a Specialist and discuss your move options, and we also recommend reading over these basic pet travel tips. The more you learn about the process, hopefully the more comfortable you'll feel about your dog's flight.

Just let us know if we can be of further assistance, and good luck!

Pet News Round-Up: Pet Resorts and Travel Reminders

Friday, January 16, 2015 by Caitlin Moore

A new luxury pet resort will be opening near the Orlando airport.

Want to know more about pet travel to Hong Kong? Read our latest Pet Move of the Month feature.

Future plans: here's more about JFK's fancy new animal handling cargo terminal.

What's better than a dog who knows how to ride the bus?

Cool pet gadgets.

More about Barbados' new pet import rules.

 

huckleberry

Have a fun weekend, pet lovers

 

How Do Pets Handle Long International Flights?

Tuesday, January 13, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Laura
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Eurasier
From: Europe
To: Boston

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I have never had a dog flown before and I wonder if there are calming medicines that are administered? How are their basic needs cared for (thinking here about the intake of food and water as well as the excretion of the same)? What are the conditions in the hold (thinking temperature, light, presence of other animals)? What happens during layovers if there is no direct flight to be had (Copenhagen-Boston)?

Thanks,

Laura
 

 

Hi Laura,

These are all great questions. The idea of putting your pet onto a long international flight can definitely feel daunting at first, but we find that the more that a pet owner learns about the process, the more confident they can begin to feel about planning a successful trip. We have helped thousands of pets move safely and would be happy to share a few tips and facts with you.

First, please know that sedation is not allowed or recommended during pet flights. Crate training is a better way to help your dog feel calm during a flight and it's a practice we do highly recommend. Helping your dog to see the crate as a comfortable and safe place is very important -- please read more about crate-training here (these tips apply to both dogs and cats).

It's also important to choose a pet-friendly airline with dedicated staff and pet safe practices. We often use KLM, Lufthansa, United and British Airways for our clients' pets due to their level of attention to their pet passengers.The cargo area of the plane is pressure and temperature controlled and, with pet-friendly airlines pets are the last to be loaded and the first to be removed upon arrival. They are situated securely and carefully with the pet's safety and comfort in mind.

Layovers can be a good thing for pets, as this will allow for a bathroom/stretch break that makes a long journey more comfortable. We often schedule our clients' flights so that they can stop at an animal hotel for a few hours or even overnight where they are tended to by professionals. The layover situation will depend on the route you ultimately choose, and we'd be happy to further discuss your options with you if you'd like.

Please fill out our online consultation form if you'd like to find out more about our services, and in the meantime you can also read over these basic pet travel tips and these recent pet move stories from our clients. Again, hopefully the more you learn the better you'll feel about your pet's travel experience.

Thanks for reading, and we hope to hear from you soon!

Pet Travel Requirements for Norway

Friday, January 9, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Tracey
Number of Pets: 4
Pet Type: 2 dogs and 2 cats
Pet Breed: Golden Retrievers and domestic cats
From: USA
To: Norway

 

Hi PetRelocation,

Do we need to have the rabies titer testing of the animals prior to the move? Are there any other tests required other than the health check and tapeworm treatment??

Thanks,

Tracey

 

Hi Tracey,

Moving pets to Norway does not require a titer test. Your dogs and cats will need microchips, rabies vaccines administered at least 21 days before departure, and the dogs will need a tapeworm treatment within one to five days of departure. As you mentioned, you'll also need a health certificate.

Take a look at an overview of the Norway pet import requirements via the USDA website, and it may also help to take a look at a few typical pet travel questions and answers to find out more about crate-training, cargo travel, and choosing a pet-friendly airline.

Finally, if you're interested in hiring some assistance with your pet move, you're welcome to fill out our online consultation form.

Hopefully this helps to point you in the right direction, Tracey. Thanks for submitting a question to us, and good luck with everything!

Pet Travel Update: Barbados Relaxes its Pet Import Rules

Thursday, January 8, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

dog chillinThe pet import requirements for Barbados have been relatively strict in the past, but as of January 1, 2015, pets from all countries can now be imported directly into the country without quarantine provided that all import requirements are met.

Import requirements vary depending on the country of origin, but certain standards apply to all pets. All dogs and cats will need to have an ISO Standard 11784 or Annex A to standard 11785 microchip and must be vaccinated with rabies after the microchip has been implanted. An Import Permit is also required; this is obtained from the Barbados Ministry of Agriculture and applications are available here. Dogs and cats also need an Export Permit endorsed by the Official Veterinary Services from their country of origin.

Per the Barbados Ministry of Agriculture, pets coming from rabies-free or low-rabies countries (these 'Category 1' countries include the United States, EU countries and Australia, for example) must meet the following requirements:

1. The pets must be microchipped;
2. The pets must be vaccinated against rabies after the microchip has been implanted;
3. Thirty-five (35) days must pass after the rabies vaccination before the pets are eligible to enter Barbados;
4. Within seven (7) days of travel, dogs must be treated against ticks and tapeworms;
5. For countries where the following diseases are endemic, the pets must be tested for heartworm, leishmaniasis, nipah virus and/or hendra virus and found to be negative;
6. Within seven (7) days of travel, the pets must undergo a veterinary examination and be issued with an Official Veterinary Export Health Certificate.

For pets coming from 'Category 2' countries (all those not considered low-rabies or rabies-free), these are the health requirements:

1. The pets must be microchipped;
2. The pets must be vaccinated against rabies after the microchip has been implanted;
3. Thirty (30) days after rabies vaccination, the pets must have a blood test (FAVN rabies antibody titre test) carried out by an approved laboratory, with a result of at least 0.5 IU/ml
4. Ninety (90) days must pass after the successful blood sample was taken before the pets are eligible to enter Barbados
5. Within seven (7) days of travel, dogs must be treated against ticks and tapeworms;
6. For countries where the following diseases are endemic, the pets must be tested for heartworm, leishmaniasis, nipah virus and/or hendra virus and found negative;
7. Within seven (7) days of travel, the pets must undergo a veterinary examination and be issued with an Official Veterinary Export Health Certificate.

All pets traveling via commercial airline must arrive in Barbados via cargo and clear customs upon arrival with the help of a customs broker. Arriving without proper notice or outside of regular business hours may incur extra fees or delays. For a full overview of the requirements as well as a list of Category 1 and Category 2 countries, please refer to the Barbados Ministry of Agriculture website.

As you can see, though the Barbados import process is now more inclusive, it still requires several careful steps and precise attention to detail. Feel free to contact PetRelocation if you have questions and would like more information about enlisting door-to-door assistance with your move.

Traveling with a Nervous Dog to Canada

Wednesday, January 7, 2015 by Pet Travel Center Questions

Name: Satya
From: Hyderabad, India
To: Vancouver, British Colombia
Pet: Chutki, Mixed Breed, 6 years old

Dear PetRelocation,
 
I would like to take my pet along with me in the cabin, is it possible to do this? She is 8 kg. Also, she is partially disabled (bent back leg) but overall healthy without any other allergies or disorders.

Basically I would like to know the pet-friendly flights from Hyderabad to Vancouver and also all the important documents required. She has never traveled anywhere and gets cranking without me around her; she is very scared and seems uncomfortable being outside of the house. I would like to know how best can we keep her with me and safe while travelling.
 
Thank You,
Satya
 
Hi Satya,
 
Thank you for your questions -- hopefully we can help shed some light on the pet travel process so that you can plan a safe and smooth relocation.
 
First, take a look at these frequently asked pet travel questions for an overview of what to expect. You'll also want to take a look at the pet import requirements for Canada. For additional resources, you can also check the official Canada Government site for information about pet import rules to Canada.
 
It sounds like your dog would benefit from some crate training; in the weeks before you plan to travel, help her to grow more comfortable with the crate by leaving it out at all times in a common area, placing toys, treats and blankets in it, and even feeding her in it. By making the travel crate feel like a normal part of her life, she won't be so nervous when it's time to get on the plane. Please read more about pet crate-training here.
 
As for airlines, we typically use KLM, United, British Airways and Lufthansa and our clients' pets travel via cargo. You're welcome to research various airlines to find out about their options for in-cabin travel, but it's likely your dog will need to travel via cargo. Please know that cargo travel can be very safe when the right decisions are made, as the information in the links above will explain.
 
If you're interested in hiring some assistance with your move, please feel free to fill out our online consultation form. We'd be happy to help!
 
Either way, good luck with everything and thanks again for reaching out.
 
 

Exploring the Option of Air Cargo Travel for Pets

Friday, January 2, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Tiffany
Number of Pets: 3
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Poodle
From: China
To: United States

 

Hi PetRelocation,

My mom is going to visit me in January and she wants to bring three small poodles with her, but the airline only allows one dog per person. I did some research and found you guys, so now I'm just wondering how this works and how much will it cost to move these three dogs from China?

Thank you,

Tiffany

 

Hi Tiffany,

Great question! It sounds like your mom will need to move the dogs via cargo, and we would recommend doing so on a pet-friendly airline (we often use United, KLM and Lufthansa, for example). If this idea is new to you, please read more about cargo pet travel and crate-training on our blog.

Still have questions and think you'd like to hire some assistance with this trip? You're welcome to fill out our consultation form to hear from a Specialist. Please note that we provide door-to-door services for relocating pets, and our costs for moving one small pet internationally usually start at around $3500 USD.

If this is just a vacation and not a permanent move, your mom may find that the costs (not to mention the time, energy and possible stress) required here may not be worth it. Finding a trusted dog sitter or boarding facility isn't always easy, either, but it would probably be simpler than bringing three dogs across the world and back in such a short amount of time (particularly because China's import requirements are stricter than those for the United States, and the dogs would have to meet those upon their return).

Again, we're happy to discuss our services with you if you're interested, so just let us know if you think we can be of further assistance.

Either way, good luck with everything!


 

Planning Dog Travel to Hawaii

Tuesday, December 30, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: LaVonne
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Great Dane
From: United States
To: Hawaii

 

Hi PetRelocation,

I'd like to know how this works and how much it costs to have my dog sent to Hawaii, and also what your company includes as far as shipping my dog (basically all information).

Thanks,

LaVonne
 

Hi LaVonne,

Thank you for reaching out to us with your question! These frequently asked pet travel questions will help to give you an overview of what to expect when relocating with a pet, and for your specific situation, you'll also want to read about what is required to move a pet to Hawaii. Since Hawaii is considered rabies-free, there are a few extra steps you must take before your dog can be accepted into the state, and the process takes a few weeks to carry out correctly and smoothly.

If you're interested in door-to-door pet transportation services like ours, you can take a look at a summary of what we do and can fill out our consultation form if you'd like to hear from a Specialist to start discussing your move options. Essentially, if you sign up with us we will help you through every step of the move (vet visits, airline booking, paperwork, etc.) and help you obtain the right travel crate (a custom crate is probably needed here). Our services aren't right for everyone, but we'd be happy to talk to you further if you'd like to find out more. For fastest service, you're welcome to give our office a call at 1-877-PET-MOVE.

Typically our costs for moving a pet domestically start at around $1200, but since you're going to Hawaii with a large dog, you can probably expect to pay more than that (the more space a pet takes up in the cargo area, the more the airline charges).

Hopefully this helps to get you started, and we hope to hear from you soon!

Tips for Safe Pet Air Travel

Tuesday, December 30, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Janeth
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Labrador Retriever
From: Tampa, FL
To: Los Angeles, CA

Hi PetRelocation,

I've been reading some horrible stories about animals dying when they fly, and it doesn't give me any peace of mind about flying anywhere with my pet. I have to fly to California because I'm moving there, but I want to find at least five top airlines that I can trust with my pet. She will be in the cargo area since she is 60 pounds.

What airlines are the best? What things could I do so my dog gets there safely with me?

Thanks,

Janeth

 

Hi Janeth,

Excellent questions! First of all, read this. Though it's common to come across news stories about pet travel mistakes and mishaps, the fact of the matter is that most pets fly safely. When you look at the numbers and realize that there are things you can do to minimize the risks of pet travel, hopefully you'll begin to see the situation a little differently (which will help you start to breathe a little easier).

What are the things you can do to help your dog travel safely? First, work on crate-training. If your dog is comfortable with her crate and even enjoys spending time in it, you'll be off to a great start. Here are a few tips for helping this to become a reality (they apply to both dogs and cats). Second, it's important to choose a pet-friendly airline. We have helped thousands of pets fly safely, and our most frequently-selected airlines include United, KLM and Lufthansa.

It usually helps to read the stories of pet travelers who have gone through this all before, so we recommend taking a look at these PetRelocation client experiences for some insight and education. Finally, here are a few frequently asked pet travel questions that might help you pick up a few tips, as well.

If you think you'd like some expert help carrying out your move, feel free to fill out our online consultation form. We'd be happy to assist you!

Thanks again for reaching out. Hopefully this information sheds light on the more positive realities of pet travel and helps you to plan a safe and low-stress trip. Good luck with everything and let us know if we can be of further assistance!
 

Nervous Owners, Nervous Pets: Addressing Common Pet Travel Concerns

Thursday, December 11, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Nicole
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dog/Cat
Pet Breed: Shepherd/Boxer mix and Tortoiseshell Cat
From: Portland, OR
To: Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I am considering moving to Argentina or Brazil next year. I will not move without my pets. However, I have heard horror stories of the percentage of dogs that die on airplanes. Can you tell me a bit about your safety measures? Will someone travel with my dog in the cargo area? How are the dogs walked/allowed to go to the bathroom on long flights?

My shepherd/boxer mix has a long snout, so the short snout breathing issue is not a problem. However, if he feels threatened, he will be aggressive. He gets reactive with big dogs (mostly other shepherds) and will chase cats (cannot be with my cat).

My cat gets very carsick, so I imagine a flight wouldn't be great either. She will bite if she is touched in the wrong spot. Can you please advise me on how this move might work and what conditions my pets would be in during their travel?

Thanks!

Nicole

 

Hi Nicole,

These are all great questions! Sad stories about airline mishaps often surface in the news, but when you look at the numbers, you'll see that air travel for pets is actually very safe. Please read more about airline pet travel myths on our blog and in this Yahoo Travel article in which we offered some advice, and you may also want to take a look at this recent infographic put together by Barkpost. 

Essentially, it's very important to choose a pet-friendly airline and to prepare your pets through crate-training, a vet health consultation and a generally healthy lifestyle. You can read more basic pet travel tips here. Pets are not accompanied in the cargo area, but this part of the plane is pressure and temperature controlled and often provides a better and more calm environment than the cabin would. Pet-friendly airlines take care to load pets last before departure and remove them first upon arrival, and they will be transported in temperature-controlled vehicles.

As for pets with possible nervousness issues or behavior quirks, please know that safe travel is perfectly possible for them, as well. When working with a pet-friendly airline, trained professionals will be handling pets during comfort stops and pets will not be interacting with other animals during this time. If your pets flew with United and were routed through Houston, for example, they would be given water and a bathroom break at a safe facility under the care of individuals prepared to handle animals of all temperament.

We often advise our clients to label the travel crates if they'd like airline or airport staff to be aware of any issues; "I'm sometimes aggressive with other dogs" or "I have anxiety around strangers" are common examples. Either way, these issues shouldn't prevent your pets from flying.

Hopefully this information helps to get you started, Nicole. If you're interested in hiring some assistance, one of our PetRelocation Specialists would be happy to discuss your options and concerns with you further. Please fill out our online consultation form at your convenience or feel free to give our office a call at 1-877-PET-MOVE. 

Good luck with everything, and we hope to hear from you!