Quantcast
Help Me Move My Pet

Pet Travel Spotlight: Boarding Facilities in Zurich

Wednesday, July 2, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

We recently helped a client move their dog to Zurich, Switzerland, and because the owners were arriving after their pet, it was necessary to find a boarding facility to use during the transition period (this happens a lot with international moves).

Zurich happens to have some of the nicest facilities we've seen, and our agent there snapped a few pictures to share. Take a look at this top-notch kennel -- it seems like a place any dog would love to stay.


zurich boarding facility

Master Suite

 

zurich boarding facility - play yard

Play Yard

 

zurich boarding facility

Home Sweet (Temporary) Home

 

Have questions about arranging an international pet relocation? Contact us for assistance.

You Already Know, but Still: Independence Day Pet Safety Tips

Thursday, July 3, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Most pet owners know the drill: dogs and cats are not big fans of fireworks or hot weather, and holiday festivities tend to invite numerous dangers (illicit foods, fire hazards, escape possibilities, etc.).

Just in case you need a reminder, though, here's a quick rundown of what to do and what not to do as this American holiday weekend gets going.

america dog

DO: Establish a safe place for your pet, be it a room with a door or a kennel he or she likes to spend time in. When the house fills up with people and fireworks start going off outside, your pet may want nothing more than a little peace and quiet.

DON'T: Leave your pet outside unattended. It may be normal for your dog or cat to stay outdoors when you're not around, but getting spooked by loud firecrackers and running away is a very common behavior this time of year.

DO: Keep your pet on as regular a routine as possible. Keep walking and feeding them on the same schedule and be sure to fit in plenty of anxiety-suppressing exercise.

DON'T: Allow pets to roam through parties, picnics and barbecues where potentially dangerous food and alcohol are in reach. Most dogs love to scavenge for scraps, and it doesn't take much (a cup of beer, a chocolate cookie) to make them sick.

DO: Make sure pets are wearing collars with up-to-date ID tags. History tells us that hundreds of pets do end up escaping over the Fourth of July holiday, so it's smart to be prepared just in case.

DON'T: Assume your pets are interested in the same Independence Day experience as you are. Just like during travel, it's easy to forget that pets aren't humans and their needs are different. You like fireworks, they don't. You like lively parties and spicy foods, but your pets could do without. Don't worry about how much fun they should be having, just focus on keeping them safe and content.

Do you have any additional tips to add? Feel free to share, and have a great and safe Fourth of July, American pet lovers!

 

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Vail Daily, Shane Macomber

Travel Road Block: Banned Dog Breeds in Germany

Tuesday, May 13, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Samantha
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Staffordshire Bull Terrier
From: UK
To: Germany

 

Dear PetRelocation,

Please can you tell me if and how I can take my Staffordshire Bull Terrier with me when I move to live in Germany? (Or can you advise me on who to contact to find out?) We will be moving to either Berlin or Wuppertal.

I can't find a definitive answer online.

Thanks,

Samantha

 

Hi Samantha,

Germany has strict and particular rules when it comes to dogs, and over the years various breeds, including Staffordshire Terriers, have been banned from being imported.

That being said, current rules are admittedly confusing and vary from one city to another. It wouldn't hurt to do a little research to find out if policies have changed over the last few months and have yet to be widely discussed online. 

We've heard that Germany may allow some banned breeds (Pit Bulls specifically) as long as they are registered through your local City Hall, so that's something that's worth checking out. We'd suggest calling vets or animal shelters in the area you're thinking of moving to as well as the German Kennel Club and any official government entities, such as the Department of Agriculture. You can also find more information here about various rules and possible exceptions.

Sorry we don't have clearer answers for you at this time, Samantha. As you can see, importing pets can be tricky, and in lieu of relying on online information it's best to check with an official office directly. We did quite a bit of investigation when we moved Stan, a Pit bull, to Europe recently. His owner wanted to go to Denmark but the breed is banned there, so he ended up going to Amsterdam instead.

Good luck with everything, and please let us know if we can be of service to you in the future. Also, feel free to update us if you find out anything definitively, and all you pet travelers who might be reading this, let us know in the comments if you know something for sure that we don't!

 

 

Summer Pet Travel: 2014 Airline Embargo Information

Thursday, April 10, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

puku the bulldogIt's that time again... As summer approaches many people start to plan their relocations, and it's important to be aware of temperature-based airline embargoes that may affect travel arrangements for pets.

Read on for an initial list of embargoes from major airlines. We'll be sure to keep you updated as changes are made and more restrictions are announced, so keep in touch if you have a pet move on the horizon.

United

  • ALWAYS: No English Bulldogs, French Bulldogs or their mixes unless under 6 months or under 20 lbs
  • May 15th – September 15th: No Pugs, Boston Terriers, French/American Bulldogs unless under 6 months old
  • September 16th – May 14th: Snub-nosed breeds are accepted if forecast temperature is 85 degrees or lower during departure/arrival times

KLM

ALWAYS: No English Bulldogs, French Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, or Pugs

British Airways

  • March 22nd – October 22nd: No pets in or out of PHX
  • June 1st – September 15th: No pets in or out of DFW, IAH, DEN or AUS
  • April 21st – October 21st: No pets in or out of LAS
  • ALWAYS: No Bulldogs, Pugs, or Pekinese, other snubs are acceptable if kennel is one size larger

Lufthansa

  • ALWAYS: No pets in or out of DTW if the temperature exceeds 80 degrees. Also, no Boston Terriers, Boxers, Brussels Griffin, Bulldogs (all breeds except American), Chow Chows, English Toy Spaniels, Japanese Chin, Pekinese, Pug (all breeds), or Shih Tzus unless under 80 degrees  
  • SUMMER: No pet imports into IAH (exports okay)

Delta

ALWAYS: 85 degrees maximum for all warm-blooded animals, except snub-nosed breeds. 75 degrees maximum for all snub-nosed breeds (Pit Bull, Staffordshire, Boston Terrier, Boxer, Brussels Griffin, Bulldog (all breeds), Chow Chow, English Toy Spaniel, Lhasa Apso, Japanese Boxer, Japanese Spaniel (Japanese Chin), Mastiff (all breeds), Pekinese, Pug (all breeds), Shar Pei, Shih-Tzu, Tibetan Spaniel, Burmese (cat), Exotic (cat), Himalayan (cat), and Persian (cat)

Air Canada

ALWAYS: Consult here and here to find out about the most current restrictions

Worried about summer embargoes getting in the way of your pet's move? Please contact us and we'll help you figure out the best and safest way to get your pet to your new home.

Cat Move Story: "Finally Resting in Their New Home!"

Thursday, April 10, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Christine
Pets' Names: Toulah, Sheba and Tahra
From: Los Angeles, CA
To: London, UK
 

My recent move to the UK was made possible due to the dedication, professionalism and exceptional service that PetRelocation provided.

Although I had planned my trip many months earlier, I had an unexpected family emergency that precipitated my departure out of the US within a few hours. This, of course, gave me no time to make arrangements for my cats, household effects, etc., and so it was an extremely stressful time for me leaving the county without my beloved cats, Tahra, Sheba and Toulah.

 

 

Thankfully, this is where PetRelocation showed their “big guns.” Once I was able to gather my thoughts, I called Keith and told him my dilemma. I also discussed with him my anxiousness about not being there to take my cats for their final vet check prior to departure, as they were very nervous cats and I thought someone strange taking them would unsettle them more. No worries, he says, we’ll take care of everything, just tell me what day you want them to travel, and I’ll take care of everything else.

As promised, within a day or so, Keith had flights booked and made arrangements to have my cats picked up early in the morning (7:30 a.m.) for their vet visit and then boarded at a kennel during the day until it was time for them to be transported to LAX for the 8:30 p.m. flight. I must say, it all worked liked clockwork, and I was constantly being updated on the progress of my cats via text messages up until their departure. Of course, I was still a little worried about how they would fare with this extended travel time, as the early pickup time had now increased their travel time from around 17 hours to roughly 25 hours.

 

 

On my way to Heathrow to pick up my precious cargo, I was, to say the least, very nervous. As I arrived at the pet reception area at Heathrow, I was scared to even ask how my cats had fared on the long journey. I thought, so long as I don’t ask, I won’t be the beholder of bad news. However, I had nothing to worry about, as I received a call from Keith telling me that everything was fine with my cats and all their paperwork was processed and they were ready to come out any minute. I thought, How did he know that? Amazing. It was then that I knew everything was “just fine,” and I started to relax.

On finally seeing my cats, they were in fantastic shape, alert and content in their travel carriers. I could not believe how comfortable and relaxed they all were after such a grueling journey.

I just want to thank everyone at PetRelocation, especially Keith and also Scotty, who no longer works there, for their amazing knowledge in helping me through the maze of transporting pets to the UK. These guys were unbelievably patient with me, as I ask a lot of questions and need constant reassuring, but there were never too many questions for them.

 

 

If anyone wants to transport their pet to another country, I highly recommend PetRelocation. I would not use any other company for my precious cargo. Just an amazing company with amazing people...

Christine, UK

Pet Move of the Month: Dottie's Relocation to Dubai

Tuesday, February 18, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Recently we helped Dottie, a Papillon, travel from Atlanta to Dubai. Such a long move can be complicated to plan, so we were happy to step in and assist when Dottie's owners contacted us after a new job prompted their relocation. Dottie did a great job with the move and her story (graciously shared by Dottie's "mom" Laura) reveals some excellent information and tips for other pet travelers.

Read on to find out more about pet moves to Dubai, and congrats to Dottie for being a great traveler!

Have you ever moved a pet internationally before this?

We have lived overseas before but not with a pet, so this was our first experience. We have friends who brought pets with them so I knew it could be done but I didn't yet know how.

What were some of your initial concerns?

I wanted Dottie to be safe -- I was really worried about all the terrible experiences you read online. I also had to be able to justify the cost. We have family that Dottie could have stayed with but I really wanted her with me. I did a little shopping around to get a best guess on what it would cost and decided if we could do it safely for a reasonable price we would do it.

What surprised you about the pet travel process to Dubai?

I was really pleased that Dottie was able to take a flight that stopped over in Amsterdam with KLM and then rest at the pet hotel there. I had read how wonderful that was but I didn't have any idea how to make it happen. I was also relieved and grateful that in the process PetRelocation also got Dottie registered with the municipality. That was just one more bureaucratic process I didn't have to worry about.

 

 

How did Dottie handle the transition?

When Dottie arrived she was in her crate, alert and wagging her tail. I thought she would be a little traumatized and maybe shy but she just bounced right out and started exploring the house. She was not sick or tired at all. Now she seems totally at home.

Is Dubai a pet friendly place to be?

Pets -- especially dogs -- seem to be a rather contentious issue. Some people are militantly pro-dog -- determined to have a dog even when and where they are not welcome -- and others are firmly opposed to dogs of any kind. There are a lot of people here from other places where people don't have dogs as pets and they are actually afraid. And, unfortunately there are some people here who believe dogs are "unclean" according to their religion.

So, it is very important when finding a home here that you live somewhere that dogs are welcome. Dottie lives happily in a house with her own fenced yard and no one minds. She takes walks around the neighborhood on leash with no problems. We just don't go where we aren't supposed to go. There are excellent vets, kennels and groomers as well as specialty pet stores. Interestingly, cats are very popular.

 

 

What advice do you have for people who might be planning a pet move?

If you want your pet to move with you and you are going somewhere like Dubai where you have to clear customs and other processes, professional pet relocation is the only way to go. I read a lot of stories about people trying to do it themselves and it can be terribly stressful for you and your pet and possibly even unsuccessful in a place like Dubai. Start planning early -- I started preparing Dottie about 6 months ahead -- figuring out everything she would need and planning her vet visits to get it all done so there are no last minute problems.

What made you decide to hire PetRelocation to assist you?

I Googled around to learn about accreditation and read a lot of reviews. I even seriously contacted two other accredited and well recommended companies. I got an email about a week after I called from one saying they were really busy and would call in three days -- they never did. The other sent me an email quote but I never heard from them again despite answering the email back. But as soon as I contacted PetRelocation I got a real person -- Sarah -- working on my case. She called me every couple of days, updating me and working with me on a good plan at a price I could afford. I was stressed but she really put me at ease. And all that service before I even paid a penny! I felt I had first class service for Dottie and a caring sensitive person to work it out for me.

--

Please contact PetRelocation if you have questions about your upcoming pet move!
 

Dog Travel from Italy to the United States

Monday, February 10, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Carole
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Cane Corso (110 lb.)
From: Sicily, Italy
To: Atlanta, GA

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I need cost estimate, where to buy a large pet kennel for the flight, any special paperwork that's required, etc. I already know about getting the Health Certificate from an authorized Italian vet, and the CDC said they don't require any special papers, but I don't know things like, if it's better to fly the pet via Delta, Alitalia, etc. or are there special pet transporters?

My son has been in Sicily for 11 years and is returning to the US. He asked me to find out how to transport his dog.

Thanks,

Carole

 

Hi Carole,

Thanks for contacting us with your question. To start, please take a look at the pet import requirements for the United States. The US requires that you have an international health certificate and proof that pets are up to date on the rabies vaccine.

You can review this information about choosing the correct travel crate, as well. Many people visit a pet store to "try on" the travel crate before they buy and then buy the crate there or, if no pet stores are available to your son, he can buy one online. It sounds like his dog may need a custom crate (we have information about custom crates that you'll find through the above mentioned link, and if you have questions we can tell you more).

The price of our door-to-door services depends on a several factors, but in general international moves begin at around $2,500-$3,000 USD. If you'd like to continue to research your options, another great resource for pet travel information and finding local pet agents yourself is IPATA.org.

Finally, in terms of airlines, it's very important to choose a pet-friendly airline. We often use KLM, Lufthansa and United due to their established pet policies. Since you're flying a large dog, it will also be important to check with the airline ahead of time to make sure the cargo space in the plane will be able to accommodate the crate.

This is a lot of information, so please don't hesitate to contact us if you have questions about anything, including our comprehensive services. Thanks again, and we hope to hear from you soon.



 

Figuring out Dog Import Rules for Hawaii

Monday, December 30, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Angela
Number of Pets: One
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Lab Mix
From: Brisbane, Australia
To: Hawaii, US

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I was hoping to be provided with some information about the requirements for moving my dog to Hawaii. The reading I have done this far has been very confusing.

My dog has been vaccinated with a standard yearly vaccination covering the two strands of kennel cough, parvo virus, distemper and hepatitis, along with leptospiriosis, is treated monthly for Heartworm and intestinal worms using Panoramis and monthly for external parasites using Advantix.

Australia is rabies free so she has never been vaccinated against it. Does she require vaccination against Rabies? if so how many vaccinations, how far apart and how long before travel? Is a blood test required also? How many and how long before travel? If i could also receive a simple checklist of requirements I would be very appreciative.

Thank You,

Angela

 

Hi Angela,

Thanks for the question -- pet travel to Hawaii is definitely a challenge (but certainly not impossible)!

We have a few links for you to check out: Please review this information from our blog about moving pets to Hawaii (we've helped several dogs and cats get there). Also, the best source will be the official government site that details the pet import requirements for Hawaii. Specifically for your situation, here is the checklist for pets arriving from Australia.

Essentially, you will not have to have your dog vaccinated against rabies, but you do need to have proof (via a health certificate) that she has been examined by a vet and you must certify that she has been in Australia for at least six months.

Hopefully this is everything you need to know, but if you have more questions and would like some assistance from us, please consider filling out our free quote form.

Good luck with your trip and enjoy Hawaii!

 

Traveling with a Special Needs Dog: Scooter's Story

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Relocating a healthy pet can take quite a bit of time and effort, so imagine the stress the caretaker of a special needs pet might feel at the beginning of a move.

We've helped to relocate older pets and have assisted a few with minor health concerns, but until recently PetRelocation had never had the chance to meet a dog like Scooter. Born with only two legs, Scooter was blessed to find his way to a loving home as a puppy and last month moved with his family to Malaysia.

Scooter's owner Kim was kind enough to share the story of moving Scooter and their other dog Harley from Texas to Malaysia, and she offers some excellent info about crate training, quarantine, and dealing with the stress of a move. It's a great read for anyone planning to travel with a pet!

Tell us a little bit about Scooter.

He was born from a litter of three puppies, and two out of the three were born with no front legs. My Aunt Sharon, a breeder, informed me about Scooter and his special needs and I told her that I would take him. She agreed to let me have him knowing I would give him the best care. So we took him in and he joined our family with our other hairless, Harley.

The first few months were difficult. Scooter was so tiny and could not move. His back legs were like rubber. In time, after working with him and using popcorn to entice him, he began moving. Soon he would be hopping like a bunny rabbit and walking on his back legs. He grew into a wonderfully happy and healthy guy. Now he is loved everywhere we go and he gets lots of attention.

What were your initial concerns about moving Scooter?

My husband took a job overseas in Malaysia. We were here before a few years back and left the dogs at home. It was heartbreaking for me and I missed them terribly, so this time around I refused to go without my babies. I began to do some research and found PetRelocation online. After speaking with Cara and Tyler I decided I would go for it.

I had a lot of reservations and anxiety, as Malaysia is not a very dog friendly country. As time got closer I became more and more apprehensive about the whole thing. I had fears about the long flight, and wondered if Scooter would be okay. I guess my biggest fear was that since Scooter was special needs they would think he was sick and take him away. Tyler reassured me this was not the case. I have to admit that in the back of my mind It was still a big concern for me.

 

 

What would you say to someone who was getting ready to move a special needs pet?

If you have a special needs pet, do not let that stop you from taking them with you. They are part of the family and you shouldn't leave them behind because of this. Start making the preparations for them early on. PetRelocation will definitely help in making sure you have what you need for your babies.

Tyler called the quarantine ahead of time and let them know about Scooter, so they were expecting him. I highly recommend taking your pet in cabin if you can. There are about three airlines that allow you to take your pet in cabin internationally if they are small. I also started early with using the kennels for the dogs. I went out and bought the kennel that I would be using for them to travel in. At first it wasn't an easy process -- I started putting them in for a couple of minutes and worked my way up to a few hours. I left the kennels open, and before long the dogs would go in there on their own to sleep during the day.

I HIGHLY recommend starting this process early. Take pee pads and pet snacks on the flight. Put pee pads in the kennel in case of an accident. We did have one so it was good we were prepared.

What was the biggest surprise you encountered during this process?

I guess the biggest surprise for me was how well the dogs did on the trip. I worried myself sick about how they would do on the long flight. The actual flying time was about 24 hours and three different flights, so including the 12 hour layover in Frankfurt and Thailand it ended up being about 40 hours of travel time.

They did really well, though. On the flight they whined very little. When they would get a little loud I would take the kennel to the bathroom and take them out and hold them and offer them a pee pad. I am very proud of them and I was truly surprised at how great they did. No one even knew they were there under the seat. They traveled like they had done it 100 times before, not like this was their very first time to ever be on an airplane.

I have to give a shout out to Lufthansa airlines. When I checked in at the airport with the dogs they were very nice and friendly. The agent had me take the dogs out so she could see them and hold them. They all went nuts over the dogs. I told her I was terrified to fly with them and it was their first time. She reassured me that I should never be afraid to fly with a pet on their airlines. I told her I was afraid they would bark and whine. She said if they do no one will hear them because of the sound of the engine. She was right!

 

 

Can you tell us about the arrival and quarantine processes?

Well when we finally arrived in Malaysia 40 hours later, we were all exhausted. I had to go check the dogs into immigration at the baggage claim. The lady at the pet immigration desk was not very friendly. I gave her all my paper work and signed them off. It was VERY difficult to walk away from my babies and leave them in the hands of a stranger.

As I went to my house that night I cried all the way. I could not sleep that night worrying about them. First thing the next morning, I took the one hour ride to quarantine to see my babies. Do not forget to take your passport! I checked in and they told me where the dogs were located. I took the long walk to where they were and was truly relieved when there were my two babies looking out their screen door at me. My heart was overjoyed that they were there and alive and well, and they were just as happy to see me.

The quarantine room they stayed in was big. I went to see them every day except one day. It was very hard walking away from them and leaving them there. The whines and barks always tugged at my heart. The truth is that a week is not bad at all. The quarantine place was pretty good; their room was always clean when I went to see them and they always had a full dish of clean fresh water and food. They took care of their basic needs.

I highly recommend going to see your pets as much as possible if you are able to. Everyone knew who Scooter was. I ran into one of the workers one day, and she told me that when Scooter first came she laid him on a towel and put the food and water right by him. When she came back later to check on him he was in a different spot. She was shocked to know he could move! I thought that was pretty funny. Scooter has no problem getting around for sure :). Although a little scary for us, I want to reassure you that the quarantine will care for your pet. Not like we would, but they will meet their basic needs.

 

 

I was ecstatic the day the boys came home. They are now doing well here in Malaysia and they have adjusted very well to life in a condo. The condo we live in is mostly Japanese; they love dogs and there are lots of dogs here in our condo. I have made many friends here because of the dogs.

Scooter is still the talk of the town. Poor Harley gets left in the cold, LOL. I miss the days of putting the dogs in the car and going here and there -- things are different here for sure. There are some nice doggie hotels to leave them when we travel, though.

Overall I have to say our experience was mostly a positive one. I am thrilled to have my boys here with me and I would do it all over again. Thank you PetRelocation, and I want to give a shout out to Tyler and Cara for making this all possible and making it a pretty smooth transition. I'm happy to have my WHOLE family here together at last.
 

Petmate Advisory Forum Recap

Friday, October 18, 2013 by Rachel Farris

Pop quiz: What has four sides, flies, and is more well-traveled than many of the most experienced jet-setters out there?

I'm guessing that unless you travel with pets every day, your first thought wasn't a pet travel crate! Thousands of pets are driven and flown every day around the world in a variety of travel crates. The air travel crate PetRelocation trusts for its furry fliers is the Petmate SkyKennel, one of the safest, durable, and spacious pet travel crates on the market.

What's even better is that Petmate, which makes a variety of pet products, manufactures its crates, including the SkyKennel, right up the road from the PetRelocation offices in Arlington, Texas. Last week I had the opportunity to visit Petmate as a panelist at the first annual Petmate Advisory Forum to talk about how Petmate could begin to make their products safer, healthier, and more innovative for pets and their families for home, travel, and play.

The forum consisted of representatives from several other innovative organizations, including Jim Hanophy from Operation Kindness, one of the oldest and largest nonprofit no-kill animal welfare organizations in the country, David Haworth, DVM from the Morris Animal Foundation, the largest nonprofit foundation dedicated to funding research studies to protect, treat and cure animals, and Bob Vetere from the American Pet Products Association, the largest trade association for pet products in the world. Also attending the forum was a canine behavior specialist, a pet industry analyst, a veterinarian, a pet services boutique owner, and a pet travel writer.

We met at Petmate's headquarters, which is based in Arlington just outside of Dallas and houses around 100 employees. Their headquarters are just down the road from Petmate's massive manufacturing plant, which employs several hundred people and where the bulk of Petmate's carriers and plastic-based products are manufactured. Petmate also has a resin compounder plant which creates most of the resin used in their pet products. So not only is Petmate a US-based company employing hundreds of people, but over half of the products sold by Petmate each year are manufactured right here in Texas! Most importantly, Petmate is an organization ofPetmate pet travel advisory forum pet lovers - evident in their employees' creative use of pet products in their workspaces (have you ever seen any other office with an umbrella holder filled with ChuckIts?) and an office hamster known as MC Hamster (who even has his own twitter account). Even Petmate's conference rooms are named after popular pet breeds.

Panelists also had the opportunity to go on a tour of the manufacturing plant, which was a fascinating experience. Just like one might not fully appreciate a work of art unless they watched the investment of time and material by the artist, it was fascinating and quite an honor to see the pride and love the Petmate employees have in creating their products. PetRelocation is proud to partner with Petmate and after seeing how well their products are made, I found myself even prouder.

Petmate Advisory ForumThe primary focus of the forum was answering the key question of "How do pet industry leaders meet the health, safety, and comfort needs of pets and their parents who love them?" I can't tell you exactly what was discussed - after all, I wouldn't want to ruin the surprise you may have when you come across their latest innovative product at the pet store! - but I can tell you that with a variety of perspectives around the table (including one curious Boxer puppy), the forum made for an amazing and important discussion. Petmate is clearly invested in improving and innovating upon their products, and as a pet lover first and pet industry employee second, I can't wait to see what Petmate comes up with next.

 

"How Should I Prepare my Dog for our Move to Louisiana?"

Wednesday, August 28, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Julie
Number of Pets: One
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: English Cocker Spaniel
From: Newfoundland, Canada
To: Mandeville Area, Louisiana

Hi - wondered if you can help.

I have a 6-year-old male English Cocker Spaniel. He is a family pet. He moved with us from the UK to Ontario, Canada in August 2011, and then across to Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada in April 2012.

He has a valid Rabies vaccination given on 27th April 2011, which is valid until 26th April 2014. Blood tests were carried out a month later and were all in order. He has an up-to-date booster against DHPP and an up-to-date kennel cough vaccine. He is also given Advanatge Multi-55 on a monthly basis.

Can you confirm to me that these are all the requirements that he needs to access Louisiana State?

I have also read that all dogs/cats in Louisiana are to be spayed or neutered. Does this just apply to animals that are being rehomed from adoption centres or in general? Our dog is un-neutered. He is always on a leash or in the house so there has never been an issue prior to this. Can you confirm how we stand in this situation?

Also, can you recommend any good carriers to organise his transport over to Louisiana from St. Johns Airport in Newfoundland.

Hoping to hear from you soon.

Regards,

Julie

 

Hi Julie,

Thanks for your questions. It sounds like you're a savvy traveler and take great care of your dog!

First, here are the pet import requirements for the United States. Compared to the other places you've been, these are probably easier rules to follow -- the only things your dog really needs are an updated rabies vaccine (which you seem to have) and an international health certificate, which should be issued by your vet within 10 days of departure.

It looks like Louisiana has a spay/neuter law for pets from "releasing agencies" (shelters). According to our research it's not a statewide law for all dogs, but as you get settled in and locate a vet in your new town, it would be wise to double check with him or her about any local regulations you should be aware of.

Finally, if you're interested in door-to-door transportation services, please fill out our free quote form. We specialize in getting pets safely from one place to another and would love to speak to you more about your move. Thanks again, and good luck with everything!



 

Pet Move of the Month: Milo and Joe Dirt's Move to Dublin

Thursday, August 15, 2013 by PetRelocation.com Customer

When it comes to planning a safe and successful pet move, nothing is better than working with a client who helpfully communicates with us throughout the process and even shares details about the pet-friendliness of their new city. We recently helped two great rescue cats, Joe Dirt and Milo, move with their family from California to Dublin, and their owner Charlene was kind enough to share plenty of excellent tips and observations with us about the process and about living in Dublin with cats. If you have questions about air travel with cats, read the interview below because you will surely learn something.

Thanks to Charlene for sharing her cats' adventure with us, and join us in wishing Milo and Joe Dirt good luck in Dublin and congrats for being our Pet Move of the Month!

Have you ever moved a pet internationally before?

We had the opportunity to move from San Francisco to Dublin, Ireland for a year, as the tech company where my boyfriend works is currently undergoing a European expansion. We had never moved a pet internationally before and we were really worried about how our gentle, sensitive kitties Milo and Joe Dirt would handle the move. I started researching all of the requirements for moving the cats from the States to Ireland and kept reading that it might be a good idea to hire a pet relocation company to deal with all of the logistics involved, such as health certificates, the travel component itself, and customs clearance upon arrival. PetRelocation kept coming up as a recommended company and I visited the website and was impressed with what I saw. There were several articles from well-known news organizations about the success of the company as a small business growing larger and many glowing client reviews. It was very comforting to read all of the happy move stories of past clients and see the care that was put into each move.

 

Crate training isn't so bad

 

What were some of your concerns going into the move?

We had heard a lot of negative things about the way airlines treat animal passengers and were really nervous about our cats being transported in the cargo hold of an airplane. When I spoke with Matt Kincaid and Keith Boone, they were both very helpful in walking us through the entire process and they alleviated a lot of our concerns. It was really reassuring to hear that PetRelocation.com had helped to develop the PetSafe program at United and that our babies would be traveling with an airline that had established safety procedures in place  for pets. We were very happy to hear that the cats would have a layover in one of the airports where United has a pet kennel, and that they would get to spend some time out of their crates.

Both Matt and Keith were so responsive and were great about answering my multitude of questions. I was very lucky to have Keith on standby while we were at the vet, as some issues came up where I needed expert pet relocation advice. After four years of successful microchip scanning, Milo's microchip suddenly wouldn't scan at his vaccine appointment and he had to get a new one implanted before his rabies vaccine. I was so glad to have Keith on the phone to reassure me that the timing would still work and ensure that our vet understood the whole process. Our vet was also unsure whether Joe Dirt's microchip would work with international standards, and having Keith there to verify that it would was a life saver.

 

Joe Dirt loves a lazy day


Matt and Keith were also very understanding of the fact that moving internationally is very stressful and that we needed the flexibility to make last minute decisions. We ended up having them schedule O'Brien Pet Transportation to deliver the cats to SFO instead of having one of our friends do it, and this was a great decision. Their contact knew how to package the cats together at check in to ensure they would next to each other on the flight. She also knew the man who would load them on the plane and told me that he loved animals.

We also received updates on the cats' flight information so we knew where they were at all times. Keith emailed me when they departed SFO, landed in Dulles, departed Dulles and landed in Dublin. It was great to be so informed the whole time. We decided to have the cats delivered to our residence in Dublin upon their arrival. Keith arranged this and it was a really good decision. We were exhausted upon our arrival and it was perfect to have a day to prepare for them (buy food, litter box supplies, etc.) and then have them delivered to our doorstep. A very kind Irish gentleman named Garrett rang my bell and said, "I  have two beautiful cats for delivery." I could tell he really loved animals and that our kitties had been in good hands. Joe Dirt was wide-eyed and sitting up and Milo was totally hidden under his bedding -- he had buried himself kind of like an ostrich. I signed for them and took their crates inside. They were both so happy to see us and began eating and drinking immediately.

 

Dinner time

 

Did anything surprise you about the international pet moving process?

We were really surprised at how unscathed our kitties were by the ordeal of moving, being confined to a crate, being in a loud plane, etc. We thought they would be more traumatized upon their arrival. But instead they were ready to eat and drink and be loved by us. That night when they curled up with us and purred was the best night ever. We could tell they were so happy to be with us and just wanted love.

How are your cats adjusting to the new location?

They are both doing really well. It was a little hard for them to get used to their temporary home where we stayed for two weeks, only to move again to our home where we signed a year lease. They've been a little skittish after the second move, but are still really loving and sweet. We can tell they're settling in and getting used to their new home. Soon we will be able to let them explore our back garden, a secure area where they can get a breath of fresh air!

What is life like in Dublin so far? Do you think it’s a pet friendly place to be?

Life in Dublin has been great so far. When we were still in the States, people had told us that the Irish weren't that fond of cats, which we have found to not be true. We've seen many happy, friendly kitties here and happy pets in general. It's somewhat problematic to be in the city centre without a car and to need pet supplies. We've been told that most of the large pet stores are located in the outlying suburbs. But our small neighborhood pet store has been very helpful, they're ordering the cat litter we like especially for us!

 

Hangin' around

 

What advice do you have for people who might be planning a pet move?

We didn't quite realize how stressed we would be in the final weeks before our move. We thought we'd have everything under control. Then every little thing you need to do becomes five more little things and before you know it, you're totally overwhelmed. It was just so great to be able to rely on PetRelocation's expertise during this time. It meant that we didn't have to worry about one very major component of our move, relocating the cats. And knowing that our babies were in caring hands was absolutely priceless! Milo and Joe Dirt are by far the most precious things that we moved and knowing that we made their move as safe and comfortable as possible was the most important thing in the world to us!

--

Thanks again to Charlene for sharing Milo and Joe Dirt's move story with us. Please contact PetRelocation if you have questions about your upcoming pet move, and happy traveling, everyone!

Contest Alert: Win a DogVacay with Cesar Millan

Thursday, August 15, 2013 by Caitlin Moore

Traveling with pets is becoming more popular all the time, but unfortunately you can't always bring your four-legged friends with you on vacation or on business trips. Luckily pet owners have several options when it comes to pet boarding and pet sitting, especially because websites that bring pet sitters and pet owners together are growing in popularity.

Being able to leave your pup with a fellow pet owner in a welcoming home environment definitely sounds better than boarding her at a kennel or imposing on a friend or neighbor, and a site that matches dog owners to dog sitters in an organized and transparent way makes sense. Have you tried DogVacay.com or a site like it? What did you think?

If any of this is of interest to you, then this contest will be, too. DogVacay is currently offering the chance to win a trip for two to Los Angeles, where you'll meet Cesar Millan and stay at a luxury resort while your dog stays at Millan's Dog Psychology Center (and hopefully picks up a few good behavior tips). The contest is open now through Aug. 31 and you can enter here.

Good luck, pet lovers!

 

 

Pet Move Spotlight: Stan the Man's Move to Amsterdam!

Monday, August 12, 2013 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Meet Stan. He just moved from Argentina to Amsterdam, and we wanted to share his pretty great story.

We moved Stan from New York City to Argentina a couple of years ago, and his globetrotting owner called us again when he decided to continue his adventures and move to Denmark. Unfortunately there is currently a Pit Bull ban in Denmark, but what did the owner do when he found out? He decided to change the plan and move to Amsterdam instead so he could keep his favorite Pittie with him.

Here's more about Stan's trip: It was a 36-hour journey from Argentina because he stopped for an overnight in Frankfurt, and Lufthansa required him to travel in a custom kennel. His owner says Stan handled the trip extremely well and acted as if he just had a regular day! Sounds like his past flying experiences are turning him into a travel pro.

Stan in Argentina

Note that traveling with Pit Bulls is tricky because every country has its own way of doing things, so it's important to research the details thoroughly before planning out a trip. The United States does not require Pit Bulls to be registered, for example, but in Argentina if dogs have papers stating they are "full-blooded Pit Bull" then they are not considered to be an aggressive breed by entities including KLM. PetRelocation ended up choosing to fly with Lufthansa, however, because we didn't have Stan's papers in Argentina.

This somewhat complicated move turned out well, as you can see. Stan's owner says he has never been anywhere as dog friendly as Amsterdam, and since he's been in town, Stan has been welcomed into three bars and a restaurant.

We think Stan is one lucky dog to have such an adoring owner, and we love working with such devoted pet people. We wish these sweet guys lots of luck in their new home!

Stan in Amsterdam

 

Please contact PetRelocation with questions about moving your pets, and happy traveling, everyone!

Pet Travel Question: Moving a Dog from India to the US

Thursday, July 18, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Neha
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Labrador Retriever
From: Pune, India
To: Columbus, USA

Hello,

I have a list of documents required for the move. I have a kennel club registered dog. Does my dog need to be neutered? What if I do not wish to neuter? We have all the records of his rabies vaccination and other vaccinations and can obtain the required certificates from his vet. What are the quarantine laws in the US?

Thank you,

Neha

 

Hi Neha,

Thanks for your questions. Pet transport to the United States is relatively simple, and you can see the United States pet import requirements here. You'll notice that there are no regulations regarding neutering your pet, and your dog will be allowed in the United States even if he is not neutered.

It's great that you have your dog's certificates in order, just be sure that your International Health Certificate is issued within 10 days of your departure. Additionally, because India is listed as a country affected by screwworm, your dog will need to be inspected within 5 days of departure and declared free of screwworm on his health certificate.

The United States (with the exception of Hawaii) do not require a quarantine, so as long as your dog arrives in good health with all the necessary documentation, he will not need to be quarantined.

Thanks again for your questions, and don't hesitate to contact us if you have any more. Good luck with your move!
 

Pet Travel Snapshots: A Step-by-Step Cat Relocation with Karma & Reiki

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 by Caitlin Moore

It's a fact: some pets are easy travelers and some require a little more patience and assistance. Cat owners especially often begin their pet travel preparations with hesitancy, but with a little help they're often amazed at how well their kitties adjust.

Here's a great example: Karma and Reiki, two cats we recently helped with a move from Florida to Prague. They started out a little skeptical about the whole travel process, but in the end they did a great job and they're now where they belong -- with their loving owner.

Take a look at the stages of their journey, and thanks to their owner for sharing this move with us!

 

Step 1: Getting Used to the Travel Crate

 

Reiki's new kennel. (It's good to start slow if a cat is new to travel.)

 

 

Step 2: The Big Day

 

Reiki gets comfortable on his blanket.

 

Karma isn't overjoyed right now, but in just a few hours he'll be home!

 

Step 3: Settling In

 

Here they are on Day 1 in their new home. Time to explore!

 

See? Life is getting back to normal already. What a gorgeous view!

 

Find out more about how to crate train a cat, and as always, contact PetRelocation with any questions you have.

Pet Travel News: United Announces Opening of New O'Hare PetSafe Kennel Facility

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 by Caitlin Moore

The new kennel facility at Chicago O'Hare International Airport (ORD) that we've been hearing about is now open for business, offering a new level of care for pets flying through ORD as part of United's PetSafe program.

The kennel is located inside United's ORD Cargo Facility and includes 28 individual enclosures so that animals of different species can be housed in separate ventilated, temperature-controlled areas. This is the third facility of its kind, resembling amenities already in place at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston and Liberty International Airport in Newark.

From an official United statement:

"We refer to our new facility as 'State-of-the-Arf'," said Fran Cervantes, United's PetSafe Product Development manager. "It was designed to provide the ultimate in safety and care for animals traveling with us. With the kennel location close to the gate area, and our six specially-built PetSafe vans exclusively used to transport animals, we get our four-legged passengers to and from their O'Hare flights as quickly and comfortably as possible."

In terms of specific services, pet enclosures are kept clean and sanitized, pets are walked and exercised, and upon request, they can even be bathed and groomed. Staff is on hand to oversee the pet operations, and they include PetSafe runners, Ramp and Cargo Operations teams, and a team of experts available by phone who can assist with advance reservations, monitoring pets en route, and tracking weather conditions.

According to Rod Zimmerman, United's senior manager of Cargo Operations at ORD, "Many of us are pet owners, so we're proud of our role in keeping all the animals traveling through O'Hare as safe, healthy and comfortable as possible. PetSafe's reputation as the premier animal transport service in the industry is very important to all of us."

Read more about United's PetSafe offerings at United.com and find out more about additional United product and route enhancements. As always, contact PetRelocation if you have questions about how to move your pet.

 

Pets on Trains? It Could Happen if These Lawmakers Have Their Way

Thursday, May 23, 2013 by Caitlin Moore

Evidence that the world is becoming more and more pet friendly, Washington lawmakers have introduced a bill that would allow dogs and cats to travel on trains. Currently non-service animals are not allowed to travel by Amtrak, and this bill would designate that at least one car per train to be pet friendly.

Rep. Jeff Denham is the bill's main sponsor, and he introduced it for personal reasons. “My dog, Lily, is part of our family and travels with us to and from California all the time. If I can take her on a plane, why can’t I travel with her on Amtrak, too?” he said.

If the Pets on Trains Act of 2013 is approved, traveling pets would need to be kept in a kennel and they wouldn't be able to go more than 750 miles. Passengers would pay a fee for each dog or cat they want to transport.

We'll see how it goes, but as an overall trend we like that this issue is even being discussed. By the way, are you traveling with a pet anytime soon? Take our Pet Travel Survey and tell us about it!

 

Pet Travel Question: Selecting Travel Crates and Shipping Dogs to the United States Safely

Thursday, May 23, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Karine
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dogs
Pet Breed: 1 Coton de Tulear + 1 Shih Tzu
From: Lyon, France
To: Fairport, New York, USA

Is it possible for both my dogs to travel together in the same kennel to avoid too much stress for them? What are the specific requirements for dogs to enter the United States?

Thanks!
Karine
 

Hi Karine,

Thanks for contacting us. First, here are the pet import requirements for the United States. To answer your other question, yes, each of your dogs will need an individual crate. The travel crate must meet the requirements of the airline and will be large enough to allow good air circulation.

Speaking of stress, we recommend that you crate train your dogs (on their own) well in advance of the trip so that they'll view it as a safe place to be. If your dogs feel comfortable in their crates, the trip is likely to be much easier for them.

Please let us know if you have more questions or if you're interested in our services. Have a great trip!

 

 

Pet Air Travel Update: United PetSafe Rate Adjustments

Monday, May 20, 2013 by Caitlin Moore

Some pet travelers will see new air travel rates beginning June 15, United Cargo has announced, so travelers planning to use PetSafe animal transportation services (United's specialized pet program) should check with the airline ahead of time to find out how much they should expect to pay.

Rates for some routes (including those going from the United States to Japan and other Pacific destinations) will decrease, while routes from the U.S. to Guam and Micronesia will increase. According to United, the changes are a result of "recent market evaluations" and the desire to offer competitive pricing.

Says United: "A key benefit of United Cargo's PetSafe is the use of climate-controlled vans to transport our four-legged customers between their flight and our facility safely and comfortably. United Cargo employs more of these specially-designed vans than any other carrier. Also, we recently opened our newest on-site PetSafe kennel facility at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. United operates similar kennels at our airport facilities in Houston and Newark, and these kennels provide the ultimate in care and comfort for animals traveling on United Airlines."

Visit United.com for more information about PetSafe routes and fees, feel free to contact PetRelocation with any questions about pet travel, and keep in touch for more pet travel updates.