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Incredible Experiences: Winston's Journey to Japan

Monday, March 2, 2015 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Erica
Pet's Name: Winston
From: Washington, D.C.
To: Okinawa, Japan

A few months ago my husband was offered a position in Okinawa, Japan and we were very excited. We love to travel and adopted Winston when we lived in South Korea a few years ago. We were looking forward to another exciting adventure, but quickly realized that Japan has a strict and lengthy process for bringing in pets. We were unprepared and in a panic. After researching our options, I found PetRelocation and I am incredibly thankful that I did.

Winston arrived in Okinawa last night and is already loving his new home. I was incredibly nervous about Winston traveling without us because he can get anxious in unfamiliar situations. But he did very well and I credit that to the professionals that made his journey as comfortable as possible. Sarah and Brooke both did an amazing job. It is obvious that they genuinely care about making this experience as stress free as possible.

Okinawa is a very pet friendly place and you can bring your dog just about anywhere! We are so happy to have Winston here and know he is going to love it. Thank you again, PetRelocation!

 

winston
Winston!

Update: New Pet Import Rules for the United Arab Emirates

Friday, February 27, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

The United Arab Emirates Ministry of Environment and Water recently announced a few changes to the UAE pet import requirements. Specifically, the list of countries exempt from requiring the rabies blood test (or titer test) has changed -- some countries have been added to the list, and some (the United States and Canada, for example) have been removed.

Pets traveling from the United States and other non-exempt countries must now secure a Rabies Blood Test Certificate from an accredited lab. The primary rabies vaccine should be done at least 21 days before the titer test, and the titer is valid for one year.

As of now, pets traveling to the UAE from the following countries do not need a titer test:

Australia, Austria, Andorra, Aruba, Barbados, Bahrain, Belgium, Comoros, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, French Polynesia, Falkland Islands, Germany, Hong Kong, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Liechtenstein, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Portugal, Qatar, San Marino, Seychelles, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom and Vanuatu.

Please read more about pet travel to the UAE, and feel free to contact PetRelocation if you have any questions about your upcoming relocation.

 

UAE

Joi Ito / Flickr

News Round-Up: Encouraging Pet Travel Updates

Friday, February 27, 2015 by Caitlin Moore

More news about pets on Amtrak trains.

Japan's 'Animal Islands.'

According to Department of Transportation data, pet air travel was safer in 2014 than in previous years.

Does your company want to relocate you abroad? Consider bringing your pet along for better chances of success.

It's Friday, so catch up with these cute pet travel stories.

Meet Tobi, one of our talented Client Care Specialists.

 

beauty

Happy Friday!

 

Pet Move of the Month: Fred & Wilma's Trip to Japan

Tuesday, February 17, 2015 by PetRelocation.com Customer

fred & wilmaThis month's featured pet move shines the spotlight on two very cool cats: Fred and Wilma. This charming duo has moved with us before (their mom is a busy world traveler), so they're becoming pros when it comes to relocating internationally.

Their latest trip took them from Germany to Japan, and now that they're settling in we thought we'd catch up and find out how things are going. Read on to find out more about Fred and Wilma!

What brought about your move?

Due to my job, I move every 2 to 3 years. I got the cats in Australia in 2007 and since then I moved them to the States, then to Germany and now Japan.

How did this particular move compare?

Both of the moves were the easiest, smoothest I ever had with the cats.

What were some of your initial concerns?

No matter where you are headed, the paperwork can be extremely confusing and overwhelming. I was worried that since I was overseas, it would be hard to get everything done on time.

What surprised you about the pet travel process? Can you discuss any particular challenges or interesting details?

The best advice I can give is to plan early. Lots of countries have strict rules about the importation of animals. In my case, I was taking my cats from Germany to Japan and had to have a 6 month “at home” quarantine. Also, lots of airlines have restrictions on the time of year the pet can travel based on the temperature.

How have Fred and Wilma handled the transition so far?

My fur babies are known for being “fraidy cats,” but as soon as they got to me here in Tokyo and out of their crates, they have just taken over the apartment. They found their box, their food and my couch for a nice nap. I just cannot get over how easily they have adapted. 

How do Japan, Germany and the United States compare in terms of pet-friendliness?

Both Germany and Japan are known for their love/obsession with their pets. The Germans LOVE their dogs and the Japanese LOVE their cats (see Hello Kitty). In Germany, I was lucky enough to have a vet that made house calls! I get my pet supplies online or from a military base, as my cats are used to American products. I know I could get anything I need here in Japan if I had to.

What advice do you have for people who might be planning a pet move?

As I say, plan early. Pets are part of your family and SO important to you, so I know the process can be stressful because you just want them to be comfortable and happy. It can be done (and be done smoothly) if you plan ahead.

 

fred & wilma settling in

 

What made you decide to hire PetRelocation to assist you?

I did my research, believe me. I went with PetRelocation because they were super responsive and totally understood how important my cats are to me.  I was encouraged by the testimonials of other clients. Also, I immediately felt at ease with my PetRelocation consultants. 

My situation was hard, as I was moving from Germany to Japan with a stop in the States in between. Turned out I had to leave the cats with my brother in the States for 6 months due to a Japanese regulation for an “at home quarantine.” My consultants treated my brother with as much respect as they gave me and constantly kept us both informed.

They walked us through all the paperwork and worked out a great timeline. I also LOVED that they offered a point to point delivery. They picked up the cats at my brother’s so that he would not have to tackle the nightmare of the airport processing, and they delivered the cats to me at my place in Tokyo. I have done this by myself and trust me, this was priceless!!!

Another highlight was that they tracked the cats the whole way from beginning to end so I had peace of mind the whole time. I honestly cannot recommend them enough. From beginning to end they made this process as easy and as stress free as possible. I will be using them again for sure!!!

 

Congrats to Fred, Wilma and their loving owner on another successful move! Thinking about relocating with your own pets? Feel free to contact us to speak to a Specialist about your options.

Questions about Ferret Travel to the United States

Monday, November 24, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Stephanie
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Ferret
From: Sasebo, Japan
To: Norfolk, VA

 

Hi PetRelocation,

Hello, I am interested in becoming a ferret owner and I want to make sure that I will be able to transport him once I move from Japan back to the States. We are currently scheduled to move to Norfolk, VA, but not for another year. I was just trying to get an idea of how this would work and if it's possible? Any advice would be much appreciated :)

Thanks so much,

Steph

 

Hi Steph,

First of all, it's very smart to research pet travel well in advance in order to avoid complications, so cheers to you for being proactive!

The United States is one of the more lenient countries when it comes to importing pets, and according to the USDA, there are no official animal health requirements for ferrets coming into the US. That being said, you'll want to check with the airline you're planning to use to find out what they require.

Typically, airlines need to see a vet health certificate stating your pet is healthy and fit to fly, and they will have specific requirements for the travel crate, as well. In addition to double-checking with the airline(s), it might also be helpful to discuss ferret travel with a vet so that you can ask any questions you have relating to health and travel.

Hopefully this helps to get you started! Please contact us if you're interested in finding out more about our services, and good luck with everything. 
 

Exotic Pet Travel to the United States

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Ashley
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Sugar Glider and Hedgehog
From: Okinawa, Japan
To: The United States

 

Hi,
My husband is in the U.S. Military and we currently live in Okinawa, Japan. We are due to be back in the states here in about 8-10 months or so. We have a hedgehog and sugar glider that we purchased out here and we really want to take them back to the States with us. Is this going to be possible? We really don't want to have to sell them.

If it is possible, are there any requirements by the U.S. government to bring them back with us? I talked to the local animal quarantine office and they do not have any requirement for taking the animals out of the country.

Thanks so much for your help!
Ashley
 

Hi Ashley,

Thanks for your question, we'd be happy to offer some information.

According to the USDA website, there are no import requirements for sugar gliders. According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency, hedgehogs can only enter through designated ports (find more information here).

It's a good idea to go straight to the most relevant and official source (a government office, etc.) when researching topics related to pet travel. If you decide to bring your pets to the United States, you'll also want to check in with the airline to find out what their particular regulations are regarding these types of pets -- a health certificate of some kind will likely be required.

Finally, we also suggest talking to your vet about sugar glider and hedgehog travel to be sure you can prepare them to have as safe a journey as possible. Long flights can be taxing for any kind of pet, and pre-flight health screenings and paying close attention to hydration are both good practices to follow.

Hopefully this helps get you started, Ashley. Feel free to contact us if you'd like to find out more about the services we offer.

Happy traveling!

Pet News Round-Up: Pizza Cats and Sheep Dogs

Friday, August 29, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Okay, then: this fake Pizza Hut is run by cats (in Japan).

You're on holiday. Can you/should you rescue that stray cat?

The mystery of how dogs herd sheep.

Crazy products you can buy to spoil your pet.

How to relocate your pets to a new country. How to relocate yourself to a new country.

Meet Mac and Bubba, two frequent pet travelers with lots of great tips to share.

 

 

amal

Have a good weekend!

Mac and Bubba's Adventures: Tips from a Pet Travel Pro

Thursday, August 28, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

macMany of our clients end up hiring us more than once for help with moving their pets. Due to a particular job or just a love for adventure, they find themselves needing to relocate every few years and, of course, need to bring their pets along with them.

Mac and Bubba are getting ready to move for the second time with us (they've lived in Michigan, Mexico, and now they're off to Japan), and their owners have been amazing about passing along fun and informative pet travel details. We couldn't let such great info go unshared, so we asked them to divulge a few particularly helpful tips and stories to the rest of the pet travel community.

There is some truly top-notch advice here about how to settle in with pets in a new country and how to prep your pets for a relocation. Read on to hear all about Mac and Bubba's globetrotting adventures!

What are your tips for helping your pets prepare for and recover from a big move?

At this point, both Mac and Bub are pretty seasoned travelers. 

I've had Bubba (an 8-year-old tabby cat) with me long enough now that when boxes arrive at the house, he knows what's up. I can't say he's a fan of the whole process, but I can say he's all the better about it because I calmly keep him in the loop.

What I'm saying here is that I talk to my pets. Don't pretend you don't do this too. If you care enough about them to look into a pet relocation service, you almost certainly have assigned a voice to them in your head with which they respond back in your conversations. Bubba has always sounded a bit pompous and pious; so entitled about his automatic litter box that you almost want to pinch his cheeks at how adorably wrong he is.  

Point being, your pets know your voice: it's common and familiar to them. This proved crucial on our way to Mexico, particularly as there were a few things I was unprepared for in taking Bubs as my carry on.

I had to take him out of his carrier and carry him through TSA, and they asked me to take his collar off as well.  He had no identification on his neck for a few minutes.  I tried not to act scared as I clutched him like a bear-trap. As we traveled through the Detroit airport, we passed through the "Whale-Song" tunnel. If you're not familiar, it's an art installation between two gates that features a light show and whale-song recording. This, for a cat, is TERRIFYING. When we landed, the quick pressure change resulted in Bub's immediately emptying his entire bowel... from both ends*... I had to rinse him out in the airport bathroom sink before we went through customs, because of the stink.

 

buddy

 

The notable and important part of all of that was that talking to Bubba through all of it not only kept him calm(er) because I'm familiar and he trusts me, but it helped me keep my head on straight, too. And in a few of those instances, he relied on my soothing, cooing voice to calm him enough so as not to dig his tiny dagger-like cat claws into my shoulders and leave permanent nerve damage, thus forever ruining my killer tennis game.** 

*While I felt bad for the people who were seated near us because... holy smell, Batman -- I can say it made going through customs REALLY easy because... holy smell, Batman. They didn't want to deal with him so I got buzzed through pretty quickly.

**I'm really bad at tennis, but you get the point.

Obviously, talking to your dog is a great idea too (Mac, the 5-year-old Dober-mutt, has an inner monologue that sounds quite a bit like Dug from Up). Dogs love the attention, and they want constant reassurance that they get to come along for the ride. I've never seen Mac happier than when PetRelocation brought him to our front door in Mexico, he saw my face and realized HE GOT TO COME ALONG!  

What I recommend most about dogs in particular is teaching your dog some cues in the native language. Here's the thing; Mac is a ridiculously silly, snuggly dog. But he's also rather gigantic, and his Doberman genes are pretty visible in those waggly eyebrows of his. A large portion of our Mexican friends were legitimately frightened of our dog and his breed's stereotypes. But it was really fun to see that melt away as soon as we'd say "Mac, Dame Cinco!" Showing your new Spanish-speaking amigos how they can ask your dog for a high-five in a way they understand. Now he's learning Japanese for the same reason. (In case you were curious- high five: "O-Te", or "hand, please.")

 

mac

 

Above and beyond all of that, the number one thing I recommend before your move, is to learn about the culture you're going to and what that means for your pets. Find a RELIABLE SOURCE for this information -- I can't tell you how many Americans very confidently informed me that my dog was going to be abducted and turned into tacos... and now how many tell me Bubs will become sushi. Which... I mean come on, it's not only ignorant, it's just plain offensive (I will also confidently report that you absolutely CAN drink the water in Mexico).

Mexican and Japanese people keep pets, and those pets are well loved, just in a different cultural understanding. Within the industrial city of Mexico where we stayed, if you keep a dog, it is almost certainly purebred. It usually lives outside, and it's fairly uncommon to teach them any tricks or take them for walks. Cats are pets that no one really go out to purposely adopt, but happen in a more "a stray cat had kittens in my yard. Now I have cats." Again, this doesn't mean they're unloved. I've seen Mexican friends frantically drive to a market to find kitten-milk in the middle of the night because the kittens in their garage needed it.

 

bubba

 

Anytime I walked Mac somewhere, someone would enthusiastically show me a cellphone selfie of them and their dog. Bubba ended up with his own celebrity status among the housekeeping staff at a hotel we stayed in because he looked like Garfield and he's friendly. More than once I'd come back to the room after working out to find six or seven housekeepers cooing over him or playing with the feather wand.  

Point being, once I knew where our friend's thoughts on pets and expectations started, it was a lot easier for me to assuage misconceptions and let them know just how Mac and Bub were a little bit different.

What are the biggest misconceptions about relocating with a pet?

The biggest misconception is relocating with a pet is not doable. It TOTALLY IS doable, and it's totally worth it. Help is recommended: PetRelocation (specifically the ever-lovely Sarah) has helped me with 1.5 moves now (next move in January is already underway with preparations), and she was kind enough not only to help me get the boys from point A to point B, but also helped with finding pet care resources like veterinarians, where to buy the right brand of dog/cat food, and there have even been a few times where she's helped me translate the names of vaccines or flea-preventatives. I probably could have stumbled through some of that with my limited Spanish skills, but there's something to be said about the extra confidence boost a level of expertise will give you as you pave your way in a new country.

 

mac

 

Your pets are so beyond happy for the opportunity to stay with you, because you're who they know and love, you're who adopted them and took on the responsibility of taking care of them, and you're what give your pets a sense of home. Critters are remarkably adaptive to environment, but they are loyal to their people.  And let's be honest, I wouldn't be able to call anywhere home without them.

In conclusion; keep in mind that no one is going to abduct or eat your pets, in any form of regional culinary delicacy. Try the tacos and the sushi, the curry and the papusas, because none of them are made out of Fluffy or Fido, and it's going to be the most delicious thing you've ever put in your face.

--

Thanks to Mac and Bubba's owner for this insightful (and entertaining) information! No one said it was easy to be a devoted pet parent, but clearly it's a lifestyle that has its rewards.

One last thing: Here's a video of Mac -- it's the first in the "Mac Does Something Awesome" series (here is a link to the others). What a cool pet family!

 

 

Can Rabbits Travel to Japan?

Monday, July 28, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Emma
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Rabbit
Pet Breed: Holland Lop
From: United States
To: Japan

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I can't find any information on moving my bunny from the US to Japan, including whatever regulations they may have. Please help!

Thanks,

Emma

 

Hi Emma,

Thank you for your question! When seeking out pet import requirements for various countries it's often helpful to look at official government sites such as the USDA or the Ministry of Agriculture for the country of import.

In this case it looks like Japan's pet import information can be found on the Animal Quarantine Service page, and there is an overview of rabbit travel requirements specifically. You'll find here that you'll need an official health certificate, and upon arrival your rabbit will undergo a one-day quarantine inspection. Here's a link to a few frequently asked questions about importing rabbits into Japan.

Hope this helps! Please let us know if you think you'd like some help arranging your move. We've assisted with several rabbit relocations around the world and would be happy to discuss our services with you.

Good luck!
 

Pet News Round-Up: Pet Travel Developments and Fitness Tips

Friday, July 4, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Spotting dogs in Tokyo, Japan. (You will love this blog.)

Tips for keeping pets in good shape.

Luxury pet travel options.

A petition has been launched to let dogs ride the Eurostar.

Fourth of July pet safety tips.

Pet boarding facilities around the world.

 

callie the red lab

Have a wonderful weekend!

 

Globetrotting with Pets in Tow

Thursday, June 12, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Sienna
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dogs
Pet Breed: Terrier mix, German Shepherd mix
From: USA
To: Australia/Japan/Hong Kong

 

Dear PetRelocation,

We are just considering a move next year that would involve living in Australia, Japan, and Hong Kong for 3 months each. Would it even be possible to bring our dogs with us or are the quarantine procedures such that it would be too difficult?

Thank you in advance!

Sienna

 

Hi Sienna,

Thanks for contacting us with your question!

Honestly, these are not the easiest countries when it comes to importing pets and going from one to the next with two dogs would be a pretty big challenge. To undertake this you'd have to spend quite a bit of time researching the details, gathering the right paperwork and making sure you have all logistics (flights, quarantines, rabies vaccines, etc.) carefully scheduled.

For example, Australia requires about 190 days of preparation to bring pets into the country, including 10 days of quarantine upon arrival. Japan and Hong Kong are also somewhat strict when it comes to importing pets, and no matter what order you're wanting to arrange these visits you'd need to find veterinarians in each place to help you obtain the necessary documents/vaccines. Your dogs would also need to be comfortable spending time in their travel crates, and you'd need to be able to spend quite a bit of money on these trips, as the cost of flights and import documents, etc. can quickly add up.

You'd also want to take into account the travel experience for your dogs -- this will be taxing for them, and often pet owners decide it may not be worth the time, stress and expense to vacation with pets (as opposed to bringing them along for a permanent relocation, which most find a much easier decision to make). When handled correctly pet travel is very safe, but in regards to taking relatively short trips, the reality may be that it's better to leave your dogs with a trusted pet sitter.

For your reference, here is more information about bringing pets to Hong Kong, bringing pets to Japan and bringing pets to Australia. Please take a look at what each country entails and let us know if you have more questions.

Hopefully this information will help you make a decision! We also recommend talking to your vet, of course.

Good luck, and please let us know if there is anything else PetRelocation can do to assist you as you move forward.
 

Pet News Round-Up: Tips for Easter Pet Safety & More

Friday, April 18, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Our dogs, ourselves.

USA Today presents dog travel tips from author Kelly Carter.

The story of Dolli the cat's move to Japan.

Watch and play with your pet remotely with the successful Kickstarter project Petcube.

 Have you met the cutest baby and dog duo ever, Zoey and Jasper? Here's their Tumblr so you can catch up.

This Washington hotel is super pet friendly.

Can this man make his dog a Hollywood star?

From the archives: Tips for Easter pet travel.

Finally: Please take our pet travel survey!

 

two cats

Have a lounge-y weekend!

Cat Travel from Japan to the United States

Thursday, March 13, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: David
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Cat
Pet Breed: Scottish Fold
From: Tokyo, Japan
To: Richmond, Virginia

 

Dear PetRelocation,

What do I need to do to move my cat!? I've looked several places, and this kind of move seems to be quite rare.

Please help! Thank you!

David


Hi David,

Thanks for your question. You can start by taking a look at the pet import requirements for the United States. The primary considerations will be obtaining proof of an updated rabies vaccine and a health certificate. In general, this is one of the easier countries to import a pet.

Please use our blog as a resource if you're looking for frequently asked pet travel questions or need some assistance with crate-training your cat. We also recommend choosing a pet friendly airline with established pet policies.

Finally, you're also welcome to fill out our free quote form or give our office a call if you think you'd like to enlist our help with this relocation. Either way, thanks again for reaching out and good luck with your move!

 

Who Would Win The Pet Travel Olympics (If They Existed)?

Thursday, February 20, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

One of the reasons it's fun to watch the Olympics is they allow us the chance to get to know other countries a little better. In Sochi it's been fascinating to see how hockey, curling and skiing (things we don't see much of here in Austin, TX) unite and excite people from around the world, and we couldn't help but apply our own experiences as pet shippers to the idea of international competition.

If there was such a thing as the Pet Travel Olympics, who would the winners be? Based on our observations of pet travel trends -- who goes where and why -- here's what we came up with.

1. Most obscure/challenging country to move a pet: Papua New Guinea (Runners Up: Gambia, Sierra Leone, Angola and Cancun)

2. Cat-friendliest country:  United Arab Emirates

3. Top choice for adventure-seeking pets and owners: New Zealand (Runners up: China and Brazil)

4. Top choice country for retirees: Belize (Runners up: Ecuador, Costa Rica and Hawaii)

5. Most popular winter destination: Thailand (Runner up: Russia)

6. Most popular summer destination: Singapore

7. Most tech-oriented country: Hong Kong and Japan (tie)

8. Country with the highest percentage of sweater-wearing dogs: United Kingdom

9. Country with the most dog-friendly pubs/bars: The Netherlands (Runner up: Hong Kong)

10. Overall easiest/most welcoming to pets: United States

What do you think? Did we overlook any gold medal winners? Let us know!

 

 

Pet News Round-Up: Pet Travel Etiquette and World Pet Trends

Friday, February 7, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Famous literary pets.

An advice seeker asks: "Can I bring my four dogs with me when I visit my friends"?

More about Japan's cat cafes.

Who will win Westminster?

These were the top 10 cat names of 2013.

Homemade treats for your favorite Valentine pup.

From the New York Times: Racing to save the stray dogs of Sochi.

What's it like to relocate a dog to Singapore? Just ask Lulu.

 

Looking forward to a great weekend!

 

2014 Update: Pet Travel to Korea

Wednesday, January 8, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

The Korean government has updated the country's pet import requirements, effectively making it easier to move pets there from several places. In the past many pet travelers were tasked with completing a rabies antibody titer test before being allowed entry, but many nations no longer need to fulfill this requirement.

Find out more about moving pets to Korea, and note that, even if a rabies titer test isn't required, several other details need to be attended to in order to complete a smooth pet move. Please contact us if you have questions about moving pets to Korea (or anywhere else).

Now for your reference, if you're moving a pet to Korea from one of the following places, a rabies titer test is no longer necessary:

 

Korea-Designated Rabies Free Regions
 
Andorra French Polynesia Maldives
Armenia Germany Malta
Aruba Guadeloupe Island New Zealand
Australia Guam Palestine
Austria Hawaii Papua New Guinea
Barbados Hong Kong Portugal
Belgium Iceland Qatar
Brunei Italy Reunion Island
Cape Verde Jamaica Samoa
Cayman Islands Japan San Marino
Comoros Kazakhstan Sao Tome and Principe
Cyprus Kiribati Seychelles
Czech Republic Kuwait Singapore
Denmark Libya St. Vincent Grenadines
Djibouti Liechtenstein Sweden
Egypt Macedonia Switzerland
Estonia Malaysia United Arab Emirates
Fiji Martinique United Kingdom
Finland Mauritius Vanuatu
French Guyana Micronesia Wallis and Futuna

 

Year in Review: 2013 PetRelocation Pet Moves of the Month (Part 1)

Thursday, December 19, 2013 by PetRelocation.com Customer

This has been another fun and busy year for us, and as it draws to a close, we're looking back at some of the most memorable pet moves we completed over the last 12 months.

To start, take a look at the first few Pet Moves of the Month of 2013! You'll see why we love what we do, and why we look forward to 2014 and many more happy reunions.

 

Bear (January)

Bear moved from New York to Kenya with his owner, who works for the United Nations. Africa moves are never simple, but with the right planning they can go smoothly.

 

 

Lovie (February)

This is Lovie, who moved from Texas to Kuala Lumpur. We all fell a little in love with this sweet gal.

 

 

Lou (March)

Lou the Frenchie moved from Minnesota to Shanghai. His family is so glad they brought him along, of course.

 

 

Philly (April)

We help lots of pets move to Australia -- including Philly, a sweet Goldendoodle who traveled from Houston to Sydney.

 

 

Mahalo (May)

Mahalo is an amazing cat! He survived the Japan tsunami and zigzagged the globe until his owner was finally able to bring him home to Hawaii.

 

 

Kreuz & Legos (June)

Kreuz and Legos moved from Seattle to Taipei. Here they are sniffing out their new surroundings after fulfilling Taiwan quarantine.

 

Check out Part 2 of our Pet Moves of the Month from 2013, and follow us on Facebook for daily snapshots of our traveling pet clients.

 

 

 

 

Cat Travel to Japan

Wednesday, December 18, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Ashley
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Cat
From: England
To: Japan

 

Hi There,

I'm curious as to what the requirements are for allowing my cat to move to Japan with me, more specifically, Sapporo (though my options are open right now). In the near future I'll be moving to Japan permanently to teach English and I'd like to take my cat with me as he's quite attached to me. He follows me around everywhere and meows at my bedroom door relentlessly whilst I am at college (according to my parents) so I feel like I can't just leave him behind.

I've heard a lot about a possible six months in quarantine but no concrete answers so far so I've decided to ask. I honestly couldn't bare the guilt of leaving him in quarantine for six months, and not to mention the stress from the travel could do some damage as well. If that's the case I think it may be a better idea to not take him with me, but of course that is also something I hate to imagine doing.

In addition to this, I know that a lot of places do not accept animals so my search for a place to live would be that much harder but if I can take him with me then I'm willing to give myself that restriction.

So yeah, any information would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Ashley

 

Hi Ashley,

Thanks for your question -- we understand that pets are part of the family and it sounds like your kitty loves you very much! Here is some information about how you can bring her to Japan with you.

First, take a look at these pet import requirements via the Animal Quarantine Service of Japan. If planned correctly, you should be able to avoid a long quarantine. The process is very particular, as you can see, but we've helped many pets move to Japan and they've been able to go home to their families pretty quickly.

For general information about moving pets internationally, please take a look at these frequently asked pet travel questions. Your cat may not love the traveling experience but there are ways of preparing him as best you can (including by following these cat crate training tips).

The bottom line is to begin planning early, talk to your vet for help and advice, and continue to reach out to pet travel experts when necessary. If you're interested in finding out about our door-to-door services, you can fill out our free quote form.

Thanks again, and good luck with everything!

 

 



 

Is There a Quarantine for Cats Traveling from Japan to Australia?

Wednesday, December 11, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Lance
Number of Pets: 3
Pet Type: Cats
Pet Breed: Domestic Shorthair
From: Japan
To: Australia

 

Dear PetRelocation,

Do all the requirements for rabies vaccinations and such still apply if I'm coming from a rabies free area with my pets?

Thanks,

Lance

 


Hi Lance,

That's a great question. Figuring out the pet import requirements for Australia can definitely be tricky (especially considering that, beginning in February 2014, the quarantine rules are set to be changed).

The best way to go about researching the procedures is to visit the official Australia government website. As you'll see, they actually now provide a handy drop-down chart and timeline based on your move details. The last time we checked, the site says that pet moves taking place after Feb. 3 will fall in line with the new requirements (so pets will have a 10-day quarantine rather than the current 30-day quarantine).

Pets coming from Japan, a Category 2 country, still need to fulfill a quarantine upon arrival. For more information about Australia quarantine, please feel free to explore our blog (here's a great dog and cat quarantine story, for example). Hopefully you'll see it's not such a scary prospect!

If you have further questions and think you'd like some professional assistance with your move, please fill out our free quote form. Good luck with everything, and thanks for the questions!
 

"Can My Large Dog Fly In-Cabin?"

Wednesday, August 21, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Jennifer
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Soft coated Wheaton/Golden retriever mix
From: US
To: Japan-Tokyo

Hi,

Desperately trying to find a way my dog can ride in the cabin of a plane to relocate to Japan. She is 40 pounds so "too large" by all standards I can find but hoping someone can give me an alternative (service dog, therapy dog, specific airline?). We are too scared for her to fly under the plane in cargo.

Thanks,

Jennifer

 

Hi Jennifer,


This is a common question as many pet owners are not aware of the conditions within airplane cargo holds and are afraid of shipping their pets that way. A 40-pound dog is indeed too large to travel in-cabin on most (if not all) airlines and will have to ride as cargo.

Apart from very small pets, only trained and certified service or support dogs with legitimate documentation are sometimes allowed to accompany their owners in-cabin. If your dog is not a certified assistance dog and you are simply trying to find a way around following pet air travel regulations, you will not be allowed to fly your pet in-cabin. Falsely labeling a pet as a service animal is harmful to the validity of true service animals (and the reputation of owners) if the mislabeled dog misbehaves.

That being said, flying a pet as cargo is very safe and may in fact be more comfortable for your dog. Check out this post where we address questions about flying pets as cargo and another where we disprove myths about shipping pets as cargo. You'll learn that cargo holds are pressurized and climate-controlled, and aren't that different from the conditions in which human passengers fly in the cabin. Assuming you book with a pet-friendly airline (such as United) and that your dog's crate is airline-approved and appropriately-sized, your pet should ride safely and comfortably as cargo on his trip to Japan.

If you have any more questions about pet travel to Japan, be sure to contact us. Thanks for your question and good luck with your move!