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Help Me Move My Pet

Flying Internationally with Restricted Dog Breeds

Friday, January 30, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Biggie
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Pit Bull mix (though hasn't had DNA testing)
From: Chicago, USA
To: Bulgaria

 

Hi,

I've been researching individual airline guidelines for transporting dogs, and have found that the restricted breeds are often subtitled "brachycephalic or snub-nosed breeds," which I thought referred to dogs such as pugs and English Bulldogs. However, pure bred or any mixed breeds of Pit Bull Terriers and American Staffordshire Terriers are listed in the restricted breeds, as well. Is this because they are considered brachycephalic/snub-nosed, or is it an additional/unrelated issue? I am considering a move to Europe and will not move without my dog, but also do not want to take any extra risks if it is a greater health hazard for his breed to fly.

Additionally, I was unclear whether dogs transported in the cargo compartment can be flown in the crates that are metal only, or are you supposed to use the carriers that are plastic enclosures with metal doors? My dog is well behaved in his normal metal crate where he can easily see out, but is often anxious and frightened inside of a plastic crate with the limited number of slits.

Thanks for your help!

 

Hello,

Thanks for the question, we'd be happy to offer some guidance. Breeds such as Pit Bulls and Staffordshire Terriers are often listed as "restricted" because of historic breed bans rather than health issues. Though you'll find plenty of evidence to support the fact that these breeds are no more dangerous than any other (as we're sure you already know), their size, appearance and possible strength still dictates the policies of many countries and airlines.

We often refer to breed-specific legislation resources online when helping our clients plan out international moves, as some countries do not allow certain breeds to be imported. For example, we helped a dog named Stan move to the Netherlands in 2013 when his owner found out that he wouldn't be able to go to Denmark, where Pit Bulls are banned. Advance planning and creative solutions might be necessary for your move, as well, so it's great that you're starting the process now.

As far as travel crates, this is up to the airline. United (an airline we often choose to fly with) requires that Pit Bulls and a few other breeds travel in reinforced crates meeting IATA Container Requirement #82. KLM, Lufthansa and British Airways are also airlines that we typically select, so we recommend researching the current rules and procedures of these carriers when planning your dog's move.

We also recommend contacting the Ministry of Agriculture in Bulgaria as well as any local authorities and vets who may be able to shed light on how Pit Bulls are regulated (if at all) there. Every country is different, and it's best to learn as much as you can about laws and cultural attitudes before you go.

Hopefully this helps! Just let us know if you think you'd like some help arranging this move (you can fill out our online consultation form), and good luck with everything.

Watch out, It's a Pet Scam (Monkey Edition)

Wednesday, January 28, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Magan
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Monkey
Pet Breed: Capuchin
From: MN, USA
To: GA, USA

 

Hello,

I am taking to someone about getting a monkey, and all she wants is a shipping fee that she says is $280. She said she would be using your services. I am just wanting to make sure this isn't a scam.

Thanks,

Magan

 

Hi Magan,

That is definitely a scam. Anytime someone you don't know is offering to give you a pet (especially a high-demand breed or exotic species) and only wants to charge you transportation fees, you can assume the animal doesn't exist and they are just trying to take advantage of you.

Read more about how to avoid pet scams and know that these tactics apply to dogs, cats, birds, and yes, monkeys. We strongly advise against dealing with unknown parties online when looking to add a pet to your family, and remember that anytime you're asked to wire money for "transportation fees,"  you're in danger of falling for a well-worn scam.

For reference, moving a small pet domestically typically starts at around $1200 (this covers airfare, health documents, vet visits, travel crate, etc), so this suggested fee of just $280 serves as another red flag. Monkey travel also requires a little more planning than dog and cat travel, so if something sounds too easy to be true, it probably is.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, Magan (and hopefully you haven't sent any money yet). Please let us know if you have further questions, and good luck out there!

Corgi Travel to the United States

Wednesday, January 28, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Apollo
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Corgi
From: Taiwan
To: California/Nevada (United States)

 

Dear PetRelocation,

What do we have to do to ensure our dog can come live with us in the United States (we'll probably be landing in California). Your information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Apollo

 

Hi Apollo,

Thanks for the question, we'd be happy to help. First, read over these basic pet travel tips in order to become acquainted with the essential logistical details, and then take a look at the pet import requirements for the United States.

To summarize, you'll need proof of an updated rabies vaccine and a health certificate, an airline-approved travel crate, and before you fly we recommend acclimating your dog to the crate as well as possible. We also suggest making an effort to choose a pet-friendly airline (we often use United, KLM, Lufthansa and British Airways).

Many people choose to hire professional assistance with an international pet move; if you're looking to explore this option, feel free to fill out our online consultation form.

Hopefully this helps to get you started! Just let us know if we can be of further assistance, and feel free to peruse our blog for pet travel stories and additional advice. Good luck and travel safely!

Planning Safe Pet Travel for a 10-Year-Old Dog

Tuesday, January 27, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Duda
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Cockapoo
From: Toronto, Canada
To: Guatemala City, Guatemala

 

Hello,

I am moving to Guatemala this summer for a job and I am bringing my dog with me. He is 10 and I am a bit worried about his age when flying. Will this be a problem? Cockapoos do tend to live longer, so this isn't really as as old as if he were another breed.

Is there an alternative to shipping him in a regular cargo area on the plane? I am worried about their temperature restrictions since we are traveling in the summer and have to stop over in Houston or San Salvador.

Thank you!

Duda

 

Hi Duda,

Thanks for submitting a question to us! Before traveling with an older pet, we recommend discussing any concerns you have with your vet and also reading over these travel tips for older dogs. We've helped many dogs and cats 10 years old and older move safely, and with the right preparation and care, it is most likely a possibility for you, too.

As far as air travel, we recommend choosing a pet-friendly airline (we often use United, KLM and Lufthansa due to their pet safe policies, for example). Airlines with solid pet procedures in place are less affected by temperature, however in the heat of the summer it's possible that you'll run into various embargoes. Since the rules and ports at which they apply change each year, we recommend checking directly with the airline to find out more.

You're also welcome to fill out our consultation form to hear back from a Specialist and discuss your move options, and we also recommend reading over these basic pet travel tips. The more you learn about the process, hopefully the more comfortable you'll feel about your dog's flight.

Just let us know if we can be of further assistance, and good luck!

Preparing in Advance for Dog Travel to Australia

Monday, January 26, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Jennifer
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dogs (Summit and Daisy)
Pet Breed: Mixed (one a Boxer/Lab, the other a Carolina dog/Greyhound)
From: Seattle, WA, USA
To: Brisbane, Australia in May 2016

 

Hi There,

I know it is quite far away, but my family is looking now to move my two dogs with us when we move to Australia next May. I am very nervous about moving them (as most dog moms probably are)! I was reading that Australia limited their quarantine from 30 days to 10 days, however with no visitation allowed. How is this possible? I also read that there are only two quarantine stations available in Australia.

How have you seen the conditions of the quarantine? Will my dogs make it and be safe? What is the most economical way to get them there with the least stress for my two dogs? Also, one has special eating needs -- how will I be able to accommodate that?

If you could provide an estimate and some information it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much.

Jennifer

 

Hi Jennifer,

These are great (and understandable) questions to have, and you're very smart to be starting the process so early. It takes several months to properly prepare for a dog move to Australia, but when the right steps are taken it can be a safe and smooth process.

To start, we'd like to recommend that you take a look at the official Australia government website, where you'll find everything you need to know about import requirements and quarantine facilities. There is also a timeline calculator that will tell you what you need to do and when.

Of course it's normal to feel nervous about the quarantine part of the process, but in our experience pets do fine while staying at either of the two available facilities (one is in Sydney and one is in Melbourne) and tend to behave like their normal selves once they are home with their family. Again, on the site you'll find an explanation of quarantine procedures, including instructions for requesting permission to feed your dog special food (it can be done).

When you have some time, feel free to read a few of the stories submitted by some of our past Australia clients: here is Elvis's story, here is an account of Jack's relocation to Brisbane, and here is a video of Tilly in Sydney quarantine. As you'll see, these pet parents started out feeling pretty anxious and were glad when the move was all over, but ultimately found that it wasn't as scary as they thought it would be.

If you think you'd like some help with your move, please take a look at the services we offer and consider filling out our consultation form. With a few more details, we'll be able to provide more information about your move options.

Hopefully this helps, Jennifer! Please let us know if we can be of further assistance.
 

Pet News Round-Up: Realizing Your Pet Travel Potential

Friday, January 23, 2015 by Caitlin Moore

Will New York be the world's future pet travel hub?

Do your cats get cabin fever in the winter?

Dog training advice for 2015.

More about the new upscale pet boarding facility opening near the Orlando airport.

Cats to New York, dogs to the United Kingdom... Read all our latest pet travel Incredible Experiences!

Dog talk: off-leash etiquette.

 

cappie

Happy Friday!
 

Dog Travel from Texas to California

Tuesday, January 20, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Michelle
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: American Staffordshire Terrier
From: San Antonio, TX
To: Fontana, CA

 

Hello,

I wanted to know if there is anyway to get a rough estimate on how much it will be to transport my dog. At the moment I am currently stationed in Korea and Dom is with a friend in San Antonio, Texas. She has recently moved and I don't have her new address so I can't put it on the request sheet. If you could please let me know at your earliest convenience it would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Michelle

 

Hi Michelle,

Thanks for your inquiry. Typically our costs for moving a small pet domestically (door-to-door) start at around $1200, but costs vary depending on the circumstances. Usually larger breeds like yours are a bit more expensive to move, as a large or custom travel kennel and the plane ticket will likely cost more than those required for a smaller pet.

You're welcome to give our office a call (1-877-PET-MOVE) or fill out our consultation form if you'd like to discuss your move options with one of our Specialists. If you decide to try to handle the move on your own, please take a look at a few resources on our blog for guidance; here are several frequently asked pet travel questions along with the pet travel requirements for domestic moves.

We'd be happy to talk to you more about Dom's move and possibly give you a hand -- just let us know! Either way, thanks for reaching out and good luck with everything.


 

Pet Travel from Barbados to the United States

Monday, January 19, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: David
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Akita
From: Barbados
To: Fort Lauderdale

 

Hi PetRelocation,

We want to move our dog from the Island of Barbados to the United States -- Fort Lauderdale or Miami. Can you please advise us of the steps required?

Thanks,

David

 

Hi David,

Thanks for your question! To start, we'd suggest taking a look at these pet travel basics in order to acquaint yourself with the general process. It's also important to understand the pet import requirements for the United States.

The United States is one of the more clear and easy countries when it comes to importing pets; you'll need to have proof of an updated rabies vaccine and a health certificate showing the airline your dog is healthy and fit to fly. As you'll see when you follow the links above, we also recommend choosing a pet-friendly airline and making sure you're in line with whatever regulations/procedures that carrier has in place.

If you're interested in hiring some assistance with your move, please fill out our online consultation form to find out more about our services.

Thanks for contacting us, and good luck with everything!
 

Pet Travel Rules: Moving Pets to Scotland

Friday, January 16, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Krystle
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Bichon Frise
From: United States
To: Scotland

 

Hi,

I was hoping to get a detailed list of the export requirements from the USA and import requirements of Scotland. I'm considering using your services and I just want to know exactly what all of the requirements are.

Thank you,
Krystle
 

 

Hi Krystle,

Sure, we'd be happy to point you in the right direction. The USDA is a good source of official information; take a look here for an overview of pet import requirements to the UK (including a link to the new health certificate). As of December 2014, pet import rules to the UK have changed a bit -- please read more about those EU Pet Travel Scheme changes on our blog.

In addition to meeting these paperwork and vaccine requirements, you'll also want to prepare your dog for travel by helping him/her with travel crate acclimation. Choosing a pet-friendly airline and acquainting yourself with all travel procedures is also important. To dive deeper, please read over these frequently asked pet travel questions.

If you'd like to find out more about our door-to-door services and speak to a Specialist about your move options, you're welcome to fill out our online consultation form at your convenience or give our office a call. We've helped many pets move to Scotland (including Bella, for example) and would be happy to help with your dog's move, as well.

Hope this helps to get you started! Please let us know if/when we can be of further assistance, and good luck with everything.

 

Pet News Round-Up: Pet Resorts and Travel Reminders

Friday, January 16, 2015 by Caitlin Moore

A new luxury pet resort will be opening near the Orlando airport.

Want to know more about pet travel to Hong Kong? Read our latest Pet Move of the Month feature.

Future plans: here's more about JFK's fancy new animal handling cargo terminal.

What's better than a dog who knows how to ride the bus?

Cool pet gadgets.

More about Barbados' new pet import rules.

 

huckleberry

Have a fun weekend, pet lovers

 

It's True: Barbados Has New (Easier) Pet Import Rules

Thursday, January 15, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Joanne
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dogs
Pet Breed: Rhodesian Ridgeback
From: South Africa
To: Barbados

 

Hi There,

I recently read somewhere that from 1st January 2015, Barbados will accept pets from most countries so long as they have conformed with the necessary tests and protocol.

Could you confirm if this is correct or do we still have to go via the UK?

Many thanks in advance,
Jo

 

Hi Jo,

Thanks for your question! We're happy to report that yes, Barbados has relaxed its pet import rules and there is no longer a need to route through the United Kingdom (provided you meet the necessary requirements).

We recently discussed the new Barbados pet import rules on our blog and would be happy to answer any further questions you have. Additionally, here is a video from the Barbados Ministry of Agriculture that goes over the process:

 

New Dog Cat Promo from Ministry of Agriculture Barbados on Vimeo.

 

If you'd like to find out more about hiring some assistance with this move, please fill out our online consultation form.

Hopefully this helps you to start the planning process, Jo. Feel free to peruse our blog for more pet travel tips and pet travel stories, and good luck with everything!

Pet Move of the Month: Lucy's Journey to Hong Kong

Thursday, January 15, 2015 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Lucy on the beachMore and more people are choosing Hong Kong as a relocation destination, and with each pet move comes another chance to learn something about the process (and about pet travel in general).

On that note, we're happy to share Lucy's pet move story to Hong Kong as our latest Pet Move of the Month! In the following interview, Lucy's owner shares lots of great information about the logistics and emotions involved with international pet travel.

What brought about your move?

My company offered me a year-long assignment in Hong Kong.

Have you ever flown a pet before?

No!

What were your initial concerns?

Everything! I knew nothing about the process, and frankly the horror stories played up by the media were initially very frightening. My number one concern was Lucy’s well-being during the transport process. She can be a nervous girl and I knew that the door-to-door move was going to be very overwhelming for her. I was also concerned about the paperwork and the tight timeline, but that is why I chose to work with PetRelocation!

What surprised you about the pet travel process? Can you discuss any particular challenges or interesting details?

Having never done this, I ran into a lot of surprises! I think what shocked me most was learning that so many airports had animal hotels or similar facilities. I had no idea that such a thing existed!

We ran into a lot of challenges with my move and I am so glad to have had Brooke, our consultant, working with me every step of the way. The biggest hurdle we faced was a mix-up at the lab processing Lucy’s FAVN test the week before her move. We were already under an incredibly tight deadline with no wiggle room. The delay, coupled with a Jewish holiday (my vet would be out of the practice) and a US holiday (Columbus Day) threatened our timeline significantly. I was SO nervous!

Thankfully the results arrived in just enough time for Brooke to get creative and we found an alternative path to get Lucy out on time. I am so grateful that she had both the patience and expertise to help us navigate that challenge!

How has Lucy managed the move?

In all honestly, Lucy initially had a difficult transition. My sensitive girl was really thrown off by the travel and our new neighborhood. It took some time for us to adjust and find a new routine. I think it is really important to manage your expectations for your pet’s adjustment to a new environment. I knew it wasn’t going to be easy and that I wouldn’t have ‘my’ Lucy back for some time.

Getting into a rhythm and finding some fun things to do helped tremendously, and I’m so happy to say that she is loving life here now! She’s met some neighborhood friends and has done a lot of exploring already! Don’t underestimate your pet’s ability to adjust, just give them some time!

 

Lucy at the galleria

 

Is Hong Kong a pet-friendly place to be?

It really depends on where you live, and finding a place to live is a challenge.  My company will be keeping me in a pet-friendly serviced apartment (there are only a handful in Hong Kong) for the year to keep things easy. I was surprised to see that there are pet stores, vets and groomers everywhere, but dogs are forbidden from most public places, especially parks. Finding green space can be difficult.

I was lucky to discover a book called The Woof Guide to Hong Kong, which has been an excellent resource. We’ve managed to locate some pet ‘gardens,’ hiking spots and a couple of dog-friendly beaches. The plan is to have an adventure each weekend to keep things interesting! Overall, Hong Kong is not as dog-friendly as the US, but it could certainly be worse and thankfully we have been able to maintain a similar quality of life here.

What advice do you have for others planning a pet move?

Hire an expert! And not just any expert, PetRelocation! Put your effort and energy into your own move and have someone help with the pets, it is worth every penny! There is so much information online and much of it is conflicting.

Furthermore, the paperwork can be intimidating and overwhelming and there is no room for error! Don’t expect that you are going to be able to do it all yourself. Having an expert consultant, especially when we ran into some challenges, was my saving grace!

Why did you choose Pet Relocation?

I chose Pet Relocation for the reputation. But beyond that, I was really impressed by the information and resources on the website. I am so thankful to have had such a great team to work with. Thanks, Heather and Brooke!

Thanks to Lucy's owner Alicia for her thoughtful insights and excellent advice! Have questions about moving pets to Hong Kong or another destination? Please contact us for a consultation.

Using EU Pet Passports for Pet Imports to Canada

Wednesday, January 14, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Adam
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Mini Schnauzer
From: Netherlands
To: Canada

 

Hi PetRelocation,

I live in the Netherlands and I want to bring my dog with me to Canada on vacation. The dog was originally from Canada, so I was wondering if I can bring him back into the country with his European pet passport?

Thanks,

Adam

 

Hi Adam,

In order to bring your dog into Canada, you'll need to follow the guidelines as outlined on the official Canada government website. The fact that your dog is originally from Canada will not really affect the import requirements, but according to this site a European Union pet passport is an acceptable alternative to the required rabies certificate provided that all the details are complete and correct as outlined here.

There is no quarantine for pets entering Canada (as long as all requirements are met), and a microchip is not required (though PetRelocation does recommend microchips for all traveling pets). Finally, it's also important to check with the airline you'll be traveling with to find out about any additional requirements, and when you return to the Netherlands, you'll need to make sure you meet those airline/country import requirements, as well.

If you have any general questions about the logistics of pet travel, these frequently asked pet travel questions will provide some basic information. If you think you'd like some assistance with your dog's journey, please fill out our online consultation form. Thanks for submitting a question to us, and good luck with everything!

 

The Basics: Dog Travel to the United States

Wednesday, January 14, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Julia
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dogs
Pet Breed: Chihuahuas
From: Monaco
To: Houston, TX

 

Hi,

My husband and I are relocation from Monaco to Houston, TX in March and I need to make sure my dogs can enter without quarantine and/or problems. Can you inform me what paperwork I need, etc.?

Thank you!

Julia

 

Hi Julia,

Sure, we'd be happy to help with some information. First, please take a look at the pet import requirements for the United States. This is one of the more straightforward countries when it comes to importing pets, and essentially you'll need a vet health certificate and proof of updated rabies vaccines. There is no quarantine for pets entering the United States.

If you're new to pet travel, it may also help to look over these basic pet travel tips. As you'll see by perusing our blog, though it can often be complicated, pet travel is a safe endeavor when undertaken with the proper planning and attention to detail.

If you think you'd like some help with your move, you're welcome to fill out our online consultation form or give our office a call. Just let us know if you think we can be of further assistance, and good luck with everything!

How Do Pets Handle Long International Flights?

Tuesday, January 13, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Laura
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Eurasier
From: Europe
To: Boston

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I have never had a dog flown before and I wonder if there are calming medicines that are administered? How are their basic needs cared for (thinking here about the intake of food and water as well as the excretion of the same)? What are the conditions in the hold (thinking temperature, light, presence of other animals)? What happens during layovers if there is no direct flight to be had (Copenhagen-Boston)?

Thanks,

Laura
 

 

Hi Laura,

These are all great questions. The idea of putting your pet onto a long international flight can definitely feel daunting at first, but we find that the more that a pet owner learns about the process, the more confident they can begin to feel about planning a successful trip. We have helped thousands of pets move safely and would be happy to share a few tips and facts with you.

First, please know that sedation is not allowed or recommended during pet flights. Crate training is a better way to help your dog feel calm during a flight and it's a practice we do highly recommend. Helping your dog to see the crate as a comfortable and safe place is very important -- please read more about crate-training here (these tips apply to both dogs and cats).

It's also important to choose a pet-friendly airline with dedicated staff and pet safe practices. We often use KLM, Lufthansa, United and British Airways for our clients' pets due to their level of attention to their pet passengers.The cargo area of the plane is pressure and temperature controlled and, with pet-friendly airlines pets are the last to be loaded and the first to be removed upon arrival. They are situated securely and carefully with the pet's safety and comfort in mind.

Layovers can be a good thing for pets, as this will allow for a bathroom/stretch break that makes a long journey more comfortable. We often schedule our clients' flights so that they can stop at an animal hotel for a few hours or even overnight where they are tended to by professionals. The layover situation will depend on the route you ultimately choose, and we'd be happy to further discuss your options with you if you'd like.

Please fill out our online consultation form if you'd like to find out more about our services, and in the meantime you can also read over these basic pet travel tips and these recent pet move stories from our clients. Again, hopefully the more you learn the better you'll feel about your pet's travel experience.

Thanks for reading, and we hope to hear from you soon!

Pet Travel to New Zealand from Non-Approved Countries

Monday, January 12, 2015 by Pet Travel Center Questions

Name: Bahar
From: Teharn, Iran
To: Auckland, New Zealand
Pet: Nabat, Dog, Terrier, 2 years old, 6 kg
 
 
Dear PetRelocation,
 
As I have read, Iran is not among the "clean" countries (rabies free), and I don't know if I can move my dog to New Zealand. Could you please advise? I don't know what to do. What sort of documents and certificates are needed? Is quarantine needed on arrival?

Nabat is microchipped and has all her vaccines. She is very cute and friendly.
 
Thanks,
Bahar
 
 
Hi Bahar,
 
Thank you for your question. Unfortunately you can't move your dog directly from Iran to New Zealand; you'll first need to either go to an approved country and fulfill a six month residency there or "submit a request for inclusion" of your country in a veterinary certificate. Please read more about these options via the official New Zealand government website.
 
Due to its rabies-free status, New Zealand is a relatively challenging place for residents of any country to import a pet. For this reason many people choose to hire assistance -- either partial help or full door-to-door services such as ours. If you're interested in the former, we recommend searching for local agents via IPATA.org. If you'd like to find out more about what PetRelocation does, please fill out our online consultation form.
 
You're also welcome to take a look at our blog for answers to common pet travel questions, and for more insight into the emotional and logistical experience of a pet relocation, please read over a few of our recent client pet travel stories.
 
Hopefully this helps to get you started, Bahar. Please let us know if you think we can be of further assistance, and good luck with Nabat's move!
 

Pet News Round-Up: Rescue Stories and Cat Cafes

Friday, January 9, 2015 by Caitlin Moore

Argentina's dog-adoring president just made travel more pet-friendly in her country.

Learn more about New York City's first cat cafe.

Pet travel to Barbados just became a bit easier.  

Twenty-three dogs were saved from a Korean meat farm and brought to the United States.

Because it's Friday, here's a super cute dog video.

 

cute dog

Have a lovely weekend

Pet Travel Requirements for Norway

Friday, January 9, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Tracey
Number of Pets: 4
Pet Type: 2 dogs and 2 cats
Pet Breed: Golden Retrievers and domestic cats
From: USA
To: Norway

 

Hi PetRelocation,

Do we need to have the rabies titer testing of the animals prior to the move? Are there any other tests required other than the health check and tapeworm treatment??

Thanks,

Tracey

 

Hi Tracey,

Moving pets to Norway does not require a titer test. Your dogs and cats will need microchips, rabies vaccines administered at least 21 days before departure, and the dogs will need a tapeworm treatment within one to five days of departure. As you mentioned, you'll also need a health certificate.

Take a look at an overview of the Norway pet import requirements via the USDA website, and it may also help to take a look at a few typical pet travel questions and answers to find out more about crate-training, cargo travel, and choosing a pet-friendly airline.

Finally, if you're interested in hiring some assistance with your pet move, you're welcome to fill out our online consultation form.

Hopefully this helps to point you in the right direction, Tracey. Thanks for submitting a question to us, and good luck with everything!

Pet Travel Update: Barbados Relaxes its Pet Import Rules

Thursday, January 8, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

dog chillinThe pet import requirements for Barbados have been relatively strict in the past, but as of January 1, 2015, pets from all countries can now be imported directly into the country without quarantine provided that all import requirements are met.

Import requirements vary depending on the country of origin, but certain standards apply to all pets. All dogs and cats will need to have an ISO Standard 11784 or Annex A to standard 11785 microchip and must be vaccinated with rabies after the microchip has been implanted. An Import Permit is also required; this is obtained from the Barbados Ministry of Agriculture and applications are available here. Dogs and cats also need an Export Permit endorsed by the Official Veterinary Services from their country of origin.

Per the Barbados Ministry of Agriculture, pets coming from rabies-free or low-rabies countries (these 'Category 1' countries include the United States, EU countries and Australia, for example) must meet the following requirements:

1. The pets must be microchipped;
2. The pets must be vaccinated against rabies after the microchip has been implanted;
3. Thirty-five (35) days must pass after the rabies vaccination before the pets are eligible to enter Barbados;
4. Within seven (7) days of travel, dogs must be treated against ticks and tapeworms;
5. For countries where the following diseases are endemic, the pets must be tested for heartworm, leishmaniasis, nipah virus and/or hendra virus and found to be negative;
6. Within seven (7) days of travel, the pets must undergo a veterinary examination and be issued with an Official Veterinary Export Health Certificate.

For pets coming from 'Category 2' countries (all those not considered low-rabies or rabies-free), these are the health requirements:

1. The pets must be microchipped;
2. The pets must be vaccinated against rabies after the microchip has been implanted;
3. Thirty (30) days after rabies vaccination, the pets must have a blood test (FAVN rabies antibody titre test) carried out by an approved laboratory, with a result of at least 0.5 IU/ml
4. Ninety (90) days must pass after the successful blood sample was taken before the pets are eligible to enter Barbados
5. Within seven (7) days of travel, dogs must be treated against ticks and tapeworms;
6. For countries where the following diseases are endemic, the pets must be tested for heartworm, leishmaniasis, nipah virus and/or hendra virus and found negative;
7. Within seven (7) days of travel, the pets must undergo a veterinary examination and be issued with an Official Veterinary Export Health Certificate.

All pets traveling via commercial airline must arrive in Barbados via cargo and clear customs upon arrival with the help of a customs broker. Arriving without proper notice or outside of regular business hours may incur extra fees or delays. For a full overview of the requirements as well as a list of Category 1 and Category 2 countries, please refer to the Barbados Ministry of Agriculture website.

As you can see, though the Barbados import process is now more inclusive, it still requires several careful steps and precise attention to detail. Feel free to contact PetRelocation if you have questions and would like more information about enlisting door-to-door assistance with your move.

Traveling with a Nervous Dog to Canada

Wednesday, January 7, 2015 by Pet Travel Center Questions

Name: Satya
From: Hyderabad, India
To: Vancouver, British Colombia
Pet: Chutki, Mixed Breed, 6 years old

Dear PetRelocation,
 
I would like to take my pet along with me in the cabin, is it possible to do this? She is 8 kg. Also, she is partially disabled (bent back leg) but overall healthy without any other allergies or disorders.

Basically I would like to know the pet-friendly flights from Hyderabad to Vancouver and also all the important documents required. She has never traveled anywhere and gets cranking without me around her; she is very scared and seems uncomfortable being outside of the house. I would like to know how best can we keep her with me and safe while travelling.
 
Thank You,
Satya
 
Hi Satya,
 
Thank you for your questions -- hopefully we can help shed some light on the pet travel process so that you can plan a safe and smooth relocation.
 
First, take a look at these frequently asked pet travel questions for an overview of what to expect. You'll also want to take a look at the pet import requirements for Canada. For additional resources, you can also check the official Canada Government site for information about pet import rules to Canada.
 
It sounds like your dog would benefit from some crate training; in the weeks before you plan to travel, help her to grow more comfortable with the crate by leaving it out at all times in a common area, placing toys, treats and blankets in it, and even feeding her in it. By making the travel crate feel like a normal part of her life, she won't be so nervous when it's time to get on the plane. Please read more about pet crate-training here.
 
As for airlines, we typically use KLM, United, British Airways and Lufthansa and our clients' pets travel via cargo. You're welcome to research various airlines to find out about their options for in-cabin travel, but it's likely your dog will need to travel via cargo. Please know that cargo travel can be very safe when the right decisions are made, as the information in the links above will explain.
 
If you're interested in hiring some assistance with your move, please feel free to fill out our online consultation form. We'd be happy to help!
 
Either way, good luck with everything and thanks again for reaching out.