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Help Me Move My Pet

Watch out, It's a Pet Scam (Monkey Edition)

Wednesday, January 28, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Magan
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Monkey
Pet Breed: Capuchin
From: MN, USA
To: GA, USA

 

Hello,

I am taking to someone about getting a monkey, and all she wants is a shipping fee that she says is $280. She said she would be using your services. I am just wanting to make sure this isn't a scam.

Thanks,

Magan

 

Hi Magan,

That is definitely a scam. Anytime someone you don't know is offering to give you a pet (especially a high-demand breed or exotic species) and only wants to charge you transportation fees, you can assume the animal doesn't exist and they are just trying to take advantage of you.

Read more about how to avoid pet scams and know that these tactics apply to dogs, cats, birds, and yes, monkeys. We strongly advise against dealing with unknown parties online when looking to add a pet to your family, and remember that anytime you're asked to wire money for "transportation fees,"  you're in danger of falling for a well-worn scam.

For reference, moving a small pet domestically typically starts at around $1200 (this covers airfare, health documents, vet visits, travel crate, etc), so this suggested fee of just $280 serves as another red flag. Monkey travel also requires a little more planning than dog and cat travel, so if something sounds too easy to be true, it probably is.

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, Magan (and hopefully you haven't sent any money yet). Please let us know if you have further questions, and good luck out there!

Incredible Experiences: Max Becomes a Kiwi

Monday, January 26, 2015 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Catherine & Mark
Pet's Name: Max
From: New York City, New York, USA
To: Christchurch, New Zealand

My husband and I moved from New York City to Christchurch, New Zealand with our cat, Max, by way of 3-month stint in Bangor, Maine. New Zealand has strict rules on animals entering the country and require a pet relocation company to assist with the move. Max would live in St. Louis, MO with my mom for 3 months while he finished up relocation vet requirements.

I chose PetRelocation not only based on their customer feedback but also because of the amount of detail, care and attention I received when I made my first call to inquire. I felt that my cat would be treated not just humanely, but lovingly, from one phone conversation with Paul.

Max's care and travel planning was assigned to Brooke, who not only had to deal with my anxiety, but my mom's as well, as Max lived with her for 3 months after my husband and I relocated to New Zealand. Brooke was patient, attentive and available whenever we needed her (which was often).

 

max sleeping



There was no "easy" part to this move. I was anxious to have my cat back in my care, and when he was 6 hours into a 15 hour plane flight, there was no amount of nail-biting that made me feel better. Max of course missed his connecting flight, and my email immediately lit up with emails from Brooke updating me with all advances in his plans. She was even able to ensure that Max would not have to wait at the airport, but rather with an actual human in a quieter setting, which settled the butterflies in my stomach. Max finally arrived to the quarantine facility just a few hours later than expected.

Max is a lover. He would give us up in a heartbeat if someone else was offering a better chin rub or a few Greenies. In his world, everyone is his friend and the quarantine facility was no exception. The ladies at Canterbury Quarantine loved playing with him and thus he received great care (not to mention he was the only cat onsite at the time). When I went to pick him up he was eager to get out of his "prison" (he does not like to be confined, he's an explorer!) and on to the next adventure.

 

max hanging out

 

Now he enjoys watching the birds in our garden from our many windows and sleeping in the sunlight. He is no worse for the wear and still has all 9 cat lives (though I may have lost a few!). Moving is never easy and moving across the country with a fur baby is definitely tougher.

Without PetRelocation I think this process would have taken a great toll not only on Max, but an emotional one on me as well. I am grateful for their expertise, care, and love of animals, which helped reunite me and my husband with our beloved Max!

Thanks to Catherine and Mark for sharing their move story with us! Interested in cat travel to New Zealand (or pet travel in general)? Please contact us for a consultation.

Pet News Round-Up: Pet Resorts and Travel Reminders

Friday, January 16, 2015 by Caitlin Moore

A new luxury pet resort will be opening near the Orlando airport.

Want to know more about pet travel to Hong Kong? Read our latest Pet Move of the Month feature.

Future plans: here's more about JFK's fancy new animal handling cargo terminal.

What's better than a dog who knows how to ride the bus?

Cool pet gadgets.

More about Barbados' new pet import rules.

 

huckleberry

Have a fun weekend, pet lovers

 

Pet Move of the Month: Lucy's Journey to Hong Kong

Thursday, January 15, 2015 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Lucy on the beachMore and more people are choosing Hong Kong as a relocation destination, and with each pet move comes another chance to learn something about the process (and about pet travel in general).

On that note, we're happy to share Lucy's pet move story to Hong Kong as our latest Pet Move of the Month! In the following interview, Lucy's owner shares lots of great information about the logistics and emotions involved with international pet travel.

What brought about your move?

My company offered me a year-long assignment in Hong Kong.

Have you ever flown a pet before?

No!

What were your initial concerns?

Everything! I knew nothing about the process, and frankly the horror stories played up by the media were initially very frightening. My number one concern was Lucy’s well-being during the transport process. She can be a nervous girl and I knew that the door-to-door move was going to be very overwhelming for her. I was also concerned about the paperwork and the tight timeline, but that is why I chose to work with PetRelocation!

What surprised you about the pet travel process? Can you discuss any particular challenges or interesting details?

Having never done this, I ran into a lot of surprises! I think what shocked me most was learning that so many airports had animal hotels or similar facilities. I had no idea that such a thing existed!

We ran into a lot of challenges with my move and I am so glad to have had Brooke, our consultant, working with me every step of the way. The biggest hurdle we faced was a mix-up at the lab processing Lucy’s FAVN test the week before her move. We were already under an incredibly tight deadline with no wiggle room. The delay, coupled with a Jewish holiday (my vet would be out of the practice) and a US holiday (Columbus Day) threatened our timeline significantly. I was SO nervous!

Thankfully the results arrived in just enough time for Brooke to get creative and we found an alternative path to get Lucy out on time. I am so grateful that she had both the patience and expertise to help us navigate that challenge!

How has Lucy managed the move?

In all honestly, Lucy initially had a difficult transition. My sensitive girl was really thrown off by the travel and our new neighborhood. It took some time for us to adjust and find a new routine. I think it is really important to manage your expectations for your pet’s adjustment to a new environment. I knew it wasn’t going to be easy and that I wouldn’t have ‘my’ Lucy back for some time.

Getting into a rhythm and finding some fun things to do helped tremendously, and I’m so happy to say that she is loving life here now! She’s met some neighborhood friends and has done a lot of exploring already! Don’t underestimate your pet’s ability to adjust, just give them some time!

 

Lucy at the galleria

 

Is Hong Kong a pet-friendly place to be?

It really depends on where you live, and finding a place to live is a challenge.  My company will be keeping me in a pet-friendly serviced apartment (there are only a handful in Hong Kong) for the year to keep things easy. I was surprised to see that there are pet stores, vets and groomers everywhere, but dogs are forbidden from most public places, especially parks. Finding green space can be difficult.

I was lucky to discover a book called The Woof Guide to Hong Kong, which has been an excellent resource. We’ve managed to locate some pet ‘gardens,’ hiking spots and a couple of dog-friendly beaches. The plan is to have an adventure each weekend to keep things interesting! Overall, Hong Kong is not as dog-friendly as the US, but it could certainly be worse and thankfully we have been able to maintain a similar quality of life here.

What advice do you have for others planning a pet move?

Hire an expert! And not just any expert, PetRelocation! Put your effort and energy into your own move and have someone help with the pets, it is worth every penny! There is so much information online and much of it is conflicting.

Furthermore, the paperwork can be intimidating and overwhelming and there is no room for error! Don’t expect that you are going to be able to do it all yourself. Having an expert consultant, especially when we ran into some challenges, was my saving grace!

Why did you choose Pet Relocation?

I chose Pet Relocation for the reputation. But beyond that, I was really impressed by the information and resources on the website. I am so thankful to have had such a great team to work with. Thanks, Heather and Brooke!

Thanks to Lucy's owner Alicia for her thoughtful insights and excellent advice! Have questions about moving pets to Hong Kong or another destination? Please contact us for a consultation.

How Do Pets Handle Long International Flights?

Tuesday, January 13, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Laura
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Eurasier
From: Europe
To: Boston

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I have never had a dog flown before and I wonder if there are calming medicines that are administered? How are their basic needs cared for (thinking here about the intake of food and water as well as the excretion of the same)? What are the conditions in the hold (thinking temperature, light, presence of other animals)? What happens during layovers if there is no direct flight to be had (Copenhagen-Boston)?

Thanks,

Laura
 

 

Hi Laura,

These are all great questions. The idea of putting your pet onto a long international flight can definitely feel daunting at first, but we find that the more that a pet owner learns about the process, the more confident they can begin to feel about planning a successful trip. We have helped thousands of pets move safely and would be happy to share a few tips and facts with you.

First, please know that sedation is not allowed or recommended during pet flights. Crate training is a better way to help your dog feel calm during a flight and it's a practice we do highly recommend. Helping your dog to see the crate as a comfortable and safe place is very important -- please read more about crate-training here (these tips apply to both dogs and cats).

It's also important to choose a pet-friendly airline with dedicated staff and pet safe practices. We often use KLM, Lufthansa, United and British Airways for our clients' pets due to their level of attention to their pet passengers.The cargo area of the plane is pressure and temperature controlled and, with pet-friendly airlines pets are the last to be loaded and the first to be removed upon arrival. They are situated securely and carefully with the pet's safety and comfort in mind.

Layovers can be a good thing for pets, as this will allow for a bathroom/stretch break that makes a long journey more comfortable. We often schedule our clients' flights so that they can stop at an animal hotel for a few hours or even overnight where they are tended to by professionals. The layover situation will depend on the route you ultimately choose, and we'd be happy to further discuss your options with you if you'd like.

Please fill out our online consultation form if you'd like to find out more about our services, and in the meantime you can also read over these basic pet travel tips and these recent pet move stories from our clients. Again, hopefully the more you learn the better you'll feel about your pet's travel experience.

Thanks for reading, and we hope to hear from you soon!

Pet Travel Requirements for Norway

Friday, January 9, 2015 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Tracey
Number of Pets: 4
Pet Type: 2 dogs and 2 cats
Pet Breed: Golden Retrievers and domestic cats
From: USA
To: Norway

 

Hi PetRelocation,

Do we need to have the rabies titer testing of the animals prior to the move? Are there any other tests required other than the health check and tapeworm treatment??

Thanks,

Tracey

 

Hi Tracey,

Moving pets to Norway does not require a titer test. Your dogs and cats will need microchips, rabies vaccines administered at least 21 days before departure, and the dogs will need a tapeworm treatment within one to five days of departure. As you mentioned, you'll also need a health certificate.

Take a look at an overview of the Norway pet import requirements via the USDA website, and it may also help to take a look at a few typical pet travel questions and answers to find out more about crate-training, cargo travel, and choosing a pet-friendly airline.

Finally, if you're interested in hiring some assistance with your pet move, you're welcome to fill out our online consultation form.

Hopefully this helps to point you in the right direction, Tracey. Thanks for submitting a question to us, and good luck with everything!

Tips for Safe Pet Air Travel

Tuesday, December 30, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Janeth
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Labrador Retriever
From: Tampa, FL
To: Los Angeles, CA

Hi PetRelocation,

I've been reading some horrible stories about animals dying when they fly, and it doesn't give me any peace of mind about flying anywhere with my pet. I have to fly to California because I'm moving there, but I want to find at least five top airlines that I can trust with my pet. She will be in the cargo area since she is 60 pounds.

What airlines are the best? What things could I do so my dog gets there safely with me?

Thanks,

Janeth

 

Hi Janeth,

Excellent questions! First of all, read this. Though it's common to come across news stories about pet travel mistakes and mishaps, the fact of the matter is that most pets fly safely. When you look at the numbers and realize that there are things you can do to minimize the risks of pet travel, hopefully you'll begin to see the situation a little differently (which will help you start to breathe a little easier).

What are the things you can do to help your dog travel safely? First, work on crate-training. If your dog is comfortable with her crate and even enjoys spending time in it, you'll be off to a great start. Here are a few tips for helping this to become a reality (they apply to both dogs and cats). Second, it's important to choose a pet-friendly airline. We have helped thousands of pets fly safely, and our most frequently-selected airlines include United, KLM and Lufthansa.

It usually helps to read the stories of pet travelers who have gone through this all before, so we recommend taking a look at these PetRelocation client experiences for some insight and education. Finally, here are a few frequently asked pet travel questions that might help you pick up a few tips, as well.

If you think you'd like some expert help carrying out your move, feel free to fill out our online consultation form. We'd be happy to assist you!

Thanks again for reaching out. Hopefully this information sheds light on the more positive realities of pet travel and helps you to plan a safe and low-stress trip. Good luck with everything and let us know if we can be of further assistance!
 

Nervous Owners, Nervous Pets: Addressing Common Pet Travel Concerns

Thursday, December 11, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Nicole
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dog/Cat
Pet Breed: Shepherd/Boxer mix and Tortoiseshell Cat
From: Portland, OR
To: Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I am considering moving to Argentina or Brazil next year. I will not move without my pets. However, I have heard horror stories of the percentage of dogs that die on airplanes. Can you tell me a bit about your safety measures? Will someone travel with my dog in the cargo area? How are the dogs walked/allowed to go to the bathroom on long flights?

My shepherd/boxer mix has a long snout, so the short snout breathing issue is not a problem. However, if he feels threatened, he will be aggressive. He gets reactive with big dogs (mostly other shepherds) and will chase cats (cannot be with my cat).

My cat gets very carsick, so I imagine a flight wouldn't be great either. She will bite if she is touched in the wrong spot. Can you please advise me on how this move might work and what conditions my pets would be in during their travel?

Thanks!

Nicole

 

Hi Nicole,

These are all great questions! Sad stories about airline mishaps often surface in the news, but when you look at the numbers, you'll see that air travel for pets is actually very safe. Please read more about airline pet travel myths on our blog and in this Yahoo Travel article in which we offered some advice, and you may also want to take a look at this recent infographic put together by Barkpost. 

Essentially, it's very important to choose a pet-friendly airline and to prepare your pets through crate-training, a vet health consultation and a generally healthy lifestyle. You can read more basic pet travel tips here. Pets are not accompanied in the cargo area, but this part of the plane is pressure and temperature controlled and often provides a better and more calm environment than the cabin would. Pet-friendly airlines take care to load pets last before departure and remove them first upon arrival, and they will be transported in temperature-controlled vehicles.

As for pets with possible nervousness issues or behavior quirks, please know that safe travel is perfectly possible for them, as well. When working with a pet-friendly airline, trained professionals will be handling pets during comfort stops and pets will not be interacting with other animals during this time. If your pets flew with United and were routed through Houston, for example, they would be given water and a bathroom break at a safe facility under the care of individuals prepared to handle animals of all temperament.

We often advise our clients to label the travel crates if they'd like airline or airport staff to be aware of any issues; "I'm sometimes aggressive with other dogs" or "I have anxiety around strangers" are common examples. Either way, these issues shouldn't prevent your pets from flying.

Hopefully this information helps to get you started, Nicole. If you're interested in hiring some assistance, one of our PetRelocation Specialists would be happy to discuss your options and concerns with you further. Please fill out our online consultation form at your convenience or feel free to give our office a call at 1-877-PET-MOVE. 

Good luck with everything, and we hope to hear from you!

Update: Pet Travel to Australia from "Non-Approved" Countries

Wednesday, December 10, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

If you're planning to travel with a pet to Australia from a "non-approved" country (here's the list of country categories), be aware that the rules have recently been updated. These changes relate to the rabies titer test and where it can be administered, so will affect the pre-export travel plans of pet owners tackling this process. 

Here's what has changed, based on information from the Australian Government Department of Agriculture:

  • In Summary, a pet can now begin the rabies vaccine and titer test in the non-approved country (administered by a registered vet and blood tested in a lab recognized by DAFF with passing results). 
  • The pet will then need to travel to an approved country, where a second blood sample must be collected from the animal. The rabies antibody titre must be tested at a laboratory recognised by the competent authority of that country at least 10 days prior to export to Australia. The second RNAT test must also record a rabies antibody titre of at least 0.5 IU/m. 
  • Immediately after the blood sample is taken for the second RNAT test, an approved inactivated rabies vaccine must be given to the animal in the approved country.

 

Previously, pets from non-approved countries first had to go to an approved country to begin export testing (rabies vaccination and titer test) and could travel back to the unapproved country after passing the titer test. Then they had to travel back to the approved country for the remaining preparations. Alternatively, the pet had to travel to an approved country and stay there until export, completing all necessary procedures.

Please contact PetRelocation if you have questions about these Australia pet import changes or if you need help planning a pet move. Want to know more about the process from a pet owner's perspective? Here's a move story from one of our recent Australia clients.

Air Travel with a Puppy

Wednesday, December 10, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Alicia
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Puppy
Pet Breed: Weimaraner-hound mix
From: Oregon, USA
To: Texas, USA

 

Hi!

I have a weird question and I'm wondering if you would be able to answer it for me. I'm hoping to get a puppy in the next few months (I live in Austin), and my sister's dog happens to be pregnant (in Oregon) and she wants to give me one of her puppies.

In your professional opinion, is there any way to transport an 8-week-old puppy from Oregon to Texas? And is there a way to do it that won't cost a crazy amount of money? I'm trying to decide if it would be worth it to try and transport the puppy out here, or if it's not worth the hassle and try to find a puppy locally instead. Thanks for your help!

Thanks,

Alicia

 

Hi Alicia,

Not a weird question at all! Congratulations on deciding to bring a puppy into your life.

In terms of the general travel logistics, securing an airline-approved crate, booking a pet flight with the airline, and securing the vet health certificate most airlines require will likely amount to a few hundred dollars. Here are some guidelines for domestic pet travel if you'd like to take a look. 

Because this is such a young pet, we'd definitely advise consulting with a vet about health and safety issues as well as with the airline about their requirements -- typically proof of a rabies vaccination is required, but an exception might be made for young animals depending on the carrier.

As a company policy, PetRelocation does not transport dogs under the age of 16 weeks. This allows time for pets to grow strong enough to handle the travel experience safely and also makes them old enough to receive their vaccinations. Not everyone adheres to this guideline and of course the decision is yours to make, but we would probably recommend waiting until the puppy was older before traveling such a long distance (at which point we'd be happy to help you arrange the trip!)

Feel free to contact us if you'd like to speak to a Specialist. Thanks for reaching out, and good luck with everything!

 

Not Your Average Pet Travel Question: International Hamster Travel

Monday, December 8, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Janice
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Hamster
Pet Breed: Syrian
From: Israel
To: UK

Hi PetRelocation,

Do I need any special paperwork to transport a little hamster from Israel to the UK? I am traveling on Wednesday and today is Monday. At the very last minute I would like to give my sister's hamster a new home, as she is struggling to take care of him properly and I would love to take him back to the UK with me.

I know that from the EU no special quarantine is required but what about Israel? Also would there be a large cost? Would the hamster be able to travel in the cabin with me in a small carry box? I am flying with EasyJet. Would it be very pricey? Would it be very stressful for him?

Many thanks,

Janice
 

Hi Janice,

Thanks for contacting us! You'll want to check with UK's official government website to find out about pet import rules. Per this site, it appears that hamsters coming from Israel must must undergo a four month quarantine under the Rabies (Dogs, Cats and other Mammals) Order 1974 and also need an import license. Read more about the process here

If moving forward, you would also want to check with the airline directly to find out about their rules regarding the transport of small animals (every airline is different), and you should check with the Israel Department of Agriculture to find out about export permits, procedures, etc.

As you can see, it sounds like moving a hamster to the UK wouldn't be an easy task (especially in such a short time frame). You're welcome to contact us for more info or use IPATA.org to seek out an alternate opinion, however. 

Thanks again for the question, and good luck with everything!

Pet News Links: Pet Travel Myths and Controversies

Friday, December 5, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

The numbers don't lie: Airlines are pretty good at transporting pets

The best dog books of 2014.

This is how cats show affection to people.

#MindTheChat: Catch up with the fun pet travel Twitter chat we had this week with BBC America!

The controversies surrounding emotional support animals.

Finding Rover is an app that uses facial recognition to help bring lost dogs home.

 

Bela

Have a relaxing weekend!

 

 

Questions about Australia Dog Quarantine

Thursday, December 4, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Julie
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Shar Pei
From: Colorado, United States
To: Australia

 

Hi PetRelocation,

I'm curious about the entire relocation process. Will my dog have to be in quarantine? For how long? Is he amongst general population? Do they cater to special needs dogs? He is so submissive and susceptible to being bullied and bit bitten by other dogs regardless of size, breed, etc.

Thanks,

Julie

 

Hi Julie,

Great questions! We'd be happy to tell you more about this move process. First, take a look at the Australia pet import requirements if you've yet to do so. You can also find all official information about Australia quarantine procedures and fees here.

Your dog will stay at either Spotswood Quarantine Facility in Melbourne or Eastern Creek Quarantine Facility in Sydney. Standard quarantine lasts 10 days and visitation by the owner is not permitted. The quarantine used to be 30 days, and when it was shortened earlier this year the visitation policy was changed, as well.

Pets have their own pens while in quarantine (so won't be interacting with other animals) and will be fed and given exercise while overseen by trained staff. 

We have helped many pets move safely to Australia, and though most people don't love the idea of their dog or cat spending time in a quarantine facility, most find the process to be much easier than they originally thought. If you'd like some specific examples (what pet traveler wouldn't?), here are the stories of three cats who recently moved from California to Sydney and three dogs who traveled from Texas to Australia.

Hopefully you'll find that this necessary part of pet travel to Australia isn't really so scary, but if you still have questions or think you'd like to hire some assistance, please fill out our consultation form.

Good luck with everything, and thanks for reaching out to us!

 

weezie

Weezie is moving to Australia next year! (She'll have to save the bee costume for when she gets out of quarantine.)

 

 

Can Pet Birds Travel to Australia? Probably Not.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Curt
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Bird
Pet Breed: Cockatiel
From: Singapore
To: Australia

 

Hello PetRelocation,

We're moving to Singapore from Australia in Jan. 2015 and want to take our cockatiel with us. However, I'm having difficulty understanding if we'll be able to bring her back after a period of say three years.

Can you please advise? The information on various Australia government websites is contradictory.

Regards,

Curt
 

Hi Curt,

Thank you for your question. As the requirements currently stand, only certain types of birds from New Zealand may enter Australia. Take a look at the Australia Government Department of Agriculture website for more information.

Pet travel rules do change from time to time (Australia has both shortened the animal quarantine and increased quarantine fees in the past few months), but it seems unlikely that the requirements for birds will change that drastically in the space of three years. Australia is strict about pet imports due to its status as a rabies-free island nation, and in general birds often face more stringent import rules.

Please take a look at our blog for more information about bird travel, and for your reference, here is some guidance about moving birds to Singapore. Finally, please let us know if we can be of further assistance now or in the future.

Sorry we didn't have better news for you... Good luck!

Questions about Ferret Travel to the United States

Monday, November 24, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Stephanie
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Ferret
From: Sasebo, Japan
To: Norfolk, VA

 

Hi PetRelocation,

Hello, I am interested in becoming a ferret owner and I want to make sure that I will be able to transport him once I move from Japan back to the States. We are currently scheduled to move to Norfolk, VA, but not for another year. I was just trying to get an idea of how this would work and if it's possible? Any advice would be much appreciated :)

Thanks so much,

Steph

 

Hi Steph,

First of all, it's very smart to research pet travel well in advance in order to avoid complications, so cheers to you for being proactive!

The United States is one of the more lenient countries when it comes to importing pets, and according to the USDA, there are no official animal health requirements for ferrets coming into the US. That being said, you'll want to check with the airline you're planning to use to find out what they require.

Typically, airlines need to see a vet health certificate stating your pet is healthy and fit to fly, and they will have specific requirements for the travel crate, as well. In addition to double-checking with the airline(s), it might also be helpful to discuss ferret travel with a vet so that you can ask any questions you have relating to health and travel.

Hopefully this helps to get you started! Please contact us if you're interested in finding out more about our services, and good luck with everything. 
 

Moving Pets to South Africa

Thursday, November 20, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Chip
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Labrador/Pit Bull mix
From: Chicago, USA
To: Cape Town, South Africa

Hi PetRelocation,

What is the easiest way to transport my dog to Cape Town? We are moving in early January for at least a year to Cape Town and would hate to leave our dog here. Also, I am disabled and our dog is a service dog, but only 7 months old (will be 9 months at travel date).

Thanks!
Chip
 

Hi Chip,

Thank you for submitting a question to us. We've helped several pets move to South Africa and typically use KLM for their flights, as they area a pet-friendly airline. For an idea of the preparations that will be necessary, take a look at the pet import requirements for South Africa, which you'll need to follow carefully.

Next, here are a few pet travel tips to get you started. Generally speaking, we advise that you start the pet travel process early, talk to your vet about any health concerns you may have, and work on crate-training your dog. If your dog is a certified service animal and you'd like her/him to fly in the cabin with you, contact the airline you'll be flying with to discuss the procedures (here are KLM's animal travel guidelines, for example). We recently discussed typical scenarios for service dog travel on our blog if you'd like to take a look.

If this sounds overwhelming and you think you'd like some help with your move, please fill out our online consultation form. We'd be happy to further assist you, just let us know.

Either way, good luck and have a safe trip!

Air Travel with a Medical Alert Dog

Monday, November 17, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Kathy
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Yorkie
From: Minnesota, USA
To: Prague, Czech Republic

 

Dear PetRelocation,

My husband and I will be relocating to Prague in early December. My husband has a Medical Alert Dog (an 11 lb Yorkie) who travels with him. What are the required forms to enter the Czech Republic?

Thank you,
Kathy
 

Hi Kathy,

Thanks for submitting a question to us, we'd be happy to help with some information.

Please take a look at the pet import requirements for the Czech Republic. Regardless of your pet's status as an assistance dog, you'll need to follow the country's import rules.

We'd also like to draw your attention to these basic pet travel tips and this overview of air travel with a service dog (this post is primarily devoted to designated service animals rather than support animals, but it may have some helpful info for you, too). 

You'll definitely want to contact the airline you're flying with to find out what their specific procedures are when it comes to in-cabin assistance dogs. Different carriers have different rules, and you don't want to encounter any surprises that could cause delays on the day of departure. Lufthansa allows Guide Dogs, Emotional Support and Psychiatric Service dogs to fly free in the cabin, for example, but their website doesn't mention Medical Alert animals (so you'll need to check with them to see if it will be possible to bring your dog in the cabin).

Please contact us if you'd like a consultation with one of our PetRelocation Specialists, and feel free to explore our blog to learn about other pet travel topics of interest.

Hope this helps to get you started, Kathy. Thanks again for reaching out, and good luck with everything!

Important Updates for Pets Traveling from Australia to New Zealand

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Since New Zealand is a small island country, relatively isolated, and largely free of typical pests and diseases that affect other nations, its import rules are fairly strict. Pets, even those coming from nearby Australia, must carefully follow the requirements in order to enter.

On that note, an update: The New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries has proposed a few changes for pets traveling from Australia to New Zealand. These changes would go into effect beginning Dec. 1, 2014, so keep them in mind if you're planning to use this route.

Here's an overview of the new rules:

  • Veterinary animal inspections at international airports in New Zealand will now place take during the following time frames:

Auckland: 7:00 - 19:00

Wellington: 15:30 - 17:00

Christchurch: 13:00 - 17:00

These inspection times apply Monday through Friday with the exception of public holidays and the period between and around Christmas and New Year .

  • The proposal also includes a fee increase for arrival inspections -- an additional $150 for the first pet and $75 for each additional pet.

 

Please contact PetRelocation if you have questions about international pet travel, and keep following the blog for additional pet travel updates regarding New Zealand, Australia, and other parts of the world.

"Should We Bring Our Dog on Vacation Abroad?"

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Denise
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Lakeland Terrier
From: (Traveling internationally in general)
To: (Traveling internationally in general)

 

Hi PetRelocation,

My husband and I would like to travel abroad on vacation for two weeks to four months with our Lakeland Terrier and wonder the best source of information on how to travel with your dog. Can we take him on the plane with us under certain weight restrictions for an international flight? Do animals get passports?

Thanks,

Denise

 

Hi Denise,

Sure, we'd be happy to help with some information. For general country requirement details, take a look at our resources page or check out the USDA website (assuming you're starting in the United States). To drill down further, it's typically a good idea to contact the Ministry of Agriculture of the country you're interested in for the most up-to-date info about pet import rules there.

Here are a few answers to frequently asked pet travel questions that may help shed light on the pet travel process, as well. In summary, we recommend choosing a pet-friendly airline, asking your vet to do a health check before you go, and teaching your dog to be as comfortable as possible in the travel crate through crate acclimation.

It sounds like your dog may be too large to fly in the cabin with you (typically only small dogs have this choice), so this trip may entail cargo travel. This is a safe option when you choose a pet-friendly carrier like KLM, Lufthansa or British Airways, but it can also be expensive and taxing for your dog to experience multiple times in a short period.

Along with the paperwork and vet visits, you may find that the logistics of bringing your dog with you as you travel to several different places may be more complicated than you first imagined. It definitely makes sense to bring pets along on a permanent move, but often people find that vacationing with a pet just doesn't make sense for them. It might be better to leave your dog with a trusted sitter, instead.

It's up to you, of course, and hopefully the suggestions and links above will help you find your way to the right decision for you and your dog. Let us know if you have more questions, and good luck!

Understanding the New EU Pet Import Rules

Monday, November 10, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Georgina
Number of Pets: 3
Pet Type: 2 dogs and a cat
Pet Breed: Rottweiler, Border Collie & Staffordshire Terrier, Norwegian Forest Cat
From: Canada
To: England

 

Hi PetRelocation,

What do I need to do to prepare my animals to be relocated with me to England? Could you please send me the current requirements, as I don't want my animals to have to deal with being in quarantine.

Thanks,

Georgina

 

Hi Georgina,

Thanks for reaching out -- there are a few upcoming changes to the UK pet import process so your questions are timely.

First, take a look at the official announcement and information regarding the changes to the EU Pet Travel Scheme. Beginning in December of 2014, the rules for incoming pets will be adjusted. The primary difference involves when the pets can fly in relation to the owners (the owner must travel within five days of the pet), and a few other modifications have been made, as well.

These new rules are being closely examined by affected parties, and various pet travel companies and advocates are working hard to educate themselves and manage these new procedures. Anyone who has experience with pet travel knows that these rules could once again be adjusted, but for now it would be best to plan according to these guidelines and consult the help of experts as you move forward.

If you're interested in finding out more about our door-to-door services, please complete our free quote form. You can also keep following our blog for more updates on this matter -- changes are frequent when it comes to pet travel import rules, and we do our best to keep readers updated.

Good luck and happy traveling!