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Help Me Move My Pet

PetRelocation Team Member Spotlight: Meet Whitney!

Wednesday, August 20, 2014 by Core Values

The Core Values here at PetRelocation -- Integrity, Teamwork, Wisdom, Commitment and Innovation -- drive the work that we do and are illustrated by the people we hire.

Recently we introduced you to Penney, one of our dedicated Client Care Specialists, and today we'd like you to meet Whitney, another of our hard-working team members doing her best to make every pet move and client interaction an incredible experience.

Want to know more about what it's like to work at PetRelocation? Here's what Whitney had to say about her life as a PetRelocation Consultant.

whitney & maggieMy Journey with PetRelocation (so Far)

Day to Day

Working here is not routine or predictable, and I wouldn’t have it any other way! Discussing unusual moves – whether it is a unique pet or less familiar location – with our clients certainly keep us on our toes.

Rats, fish, birds, snakes -- they all have very different needs when it comes to transportation as well as differing import and export requirements! I often still answer calls that initially get me stuck – most recently about how to move a chicken to Vietnam (not easy)!

How I Got Here

When I stumbled upon a job listing for this company, I knew it was right for me. The position seamlessly connected my previous sales, customer service and animal experience. At this point I had no idea that there was such a huge market for this service (and my grandma will never understand: “It costs HOW MUCH to move a cat??” – love you Granny)!

Learning all of the rules, requirements and procedures involved has been quite challenging. We all gain and share knowledge every day. My co-workers have been so helpful and we all strive to provide the best experience possible to each client and their furry travelers!

The Best Parts

The most rewarding part of this job is the reunions – seeing happy owners and pets greet each other after the journey is over. I recently had the pleasure of delivering Bane, a beautiful husky, to his owners who just moved to Austin. Their excitement was contagious. I left with a huge grin and a feeling of accomplishment.

Of course, having pets in the office is a huge perk as well. There’s a dog running around daily, a resident hamster, and we even had a cat in for picture day! My pup Maggie really enjoys this.

Continuing the Journey

Change is inevitable here. This is a very unique industry with ever-changing rules and requirements, and there certainly isn’t a handbook explaining the ABCs of importing/exporting pets to every country in the world. I feel lucky to be a part PetRelocation -- a leader in our industry and a knowledgeable team that makes it all possible.

Meet the rest of the PetRelocation team, and please contact us if you have questions about your upcoming pet move.

Pet News Round-Up: Further Reading about Our Animal Friends

Friday, August 8, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Amtrak is already expanding its pilot pet travel program in Illinois.

Lovely read: A man and his cat.

Ted talks: What dogs think.

This map compares dog and cat ownership in the United States.

Due to quarantine rules, Lady Gaga's dog Asia won't be able to travel with her to, uh, Asia.

Want to know more about the life of a pet shipper? Let one of our employees tell you all about it!

 

baxter

Have a happy weekend!

Max's Incredible Experience: "Luv My New Home!"

Wednesday, July 30, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Edi
Pet's Name: Max
From: Chicago, USA
To: Malaysia

I chose PetRelocation because of their professionalism and their love for animals. I felt very comfortable speaking with their customer service, and I just knew right away that my Max was in great hands.

From the moment I decided to go with them their assistance was of high standards. My dog arrived in Malaysia as scheduled with a short quarantine and was then delivered to my door step. Max is doing wonderful and happy to be with his family.

I highly recommend PetRelocation for your pet's travel.

Thank you ♥!

 

max the dog

Pet Move of the Month: Tessa's Journey to Brunei

Wednesday, August 13, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

tessaOur latest Pet Move of the Month qualifies as a true relocation adventure -- an exciting location, a long but ultimately smooth journey, a happy release from quarantine, and of course, an adorable and well-loved dog.

Meet Tessa, who we helped move from Houston to Brunei, and thanks to her owner Joe for kindly answering our questions!

What brought about your move?

My work transferred me to Brunei. 

Have you ever moved a pet internationally before this?

No.

What were some of your initial concerns?

My foremost concern was how Tessa would do in a crate on the long flight (food, water, exercise, comfort, maintaining a clean crate, etc.).  Another concern included how she would react to strangers handling her crate.  

What surprised you about the pet travel process? Anything notable about Brunei and the quarantine process there?

No real ‘surprises’ with the travel process itself, that was explained in great detail before Tessa traveled.  I just had a heightened sense of anticipation from the time she departed the States until I saw her again in Brunei.  The only hiccup came when she got delayed in Amsterdam due to local holidays on her onward travel route.  I was very happy I was provided daily updates on her from Amsterdam and every arrival and departure along the way.      

 

tessa

Tessa and her impressive digs

 

Brunei is very strict about pet importation. Travelers coming to Brunei with pets must obtain a permit prior to importation of the animal by requesting entry from the Department of Agriculture Veterinary Office.  Brunei law requires a 6 month quarantine for all animals entering the country.  That rule may fluctuate depending on status of the owner (diplomatic personnel, military personnel, etc.).

In any case, pet owners can apply for early release from the quarantine facility, but the pet is required to serve the remainder of quarantine time in ‘home confinement’.  A colleague of mine whose pet arrived in Brunei just before Tessa applied for early release and had his pet home in one week.  I applied as soon as Tessa arrived, limiting her time in the quarantine facility to just over a week.  

How has Tessa handled the transition so far?

Tessa has been great throughout this entire process.  She has remained friendly and very inquisitive about her new environment.  As soon as she got to her new house, she checked the whole place out then found a spot on the bed for a nap.  Our pets really are more resilient than we give them credit for.  

Is Brunei a pet-friendly place to be?

Being a predominantly Muslim country, dogs are usually not kept as pets in Brunei.  The locals do understand, though, and accept that Westerners will have dogs in and around their homes.  Strict local Muslims will not enter a home where a dog resides.  However, there are enough local places for her to run and play and there is a growing expat community of people who also have dogs, so Tessa will have playmates.   

 

omar ali saifuddien mosque with stone boat and lagoon at night

Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddien Mosque

 

As Brunei is mostly jungle, there are still many wild animals in close proximity to homes that can cause serious injury or death to pets. Most common are monkeys and monitor lizards. Monkeys may be scared of dogs, but the monitor lizards are known to be aggressive when hunting food.

I thought about that one night as she and I were on a walk on a road near the house. All of the sudden the trees seemed to come alive with screaming monkeys. They didn't like having Tess around. When she got close to the trees they climbed higher but followed us and stayed vocal the whole time we were in the area. Kinda cool actually, and Tess stayed calm and didn't see what the big deal was all about.

What advice do you have for people who might be planning a pet move?

Be sure to do research on the country where you intend to take your pet, including social norms/customs, support network (i.e. veterinarian, boarding facilities, etc.) and the type of food available locally.  I have traveled extensively and seen many times where the host government may approve or allow the importation of animals but the reaction from the community may not always be welcoming.  This can strain relations with neighbors and acquaintances and limit the experiences you can share with your pet.      

 

tessa

Making herself at home

 

What made you decide to hire PetRelocation to assist you?

I contacted several transport services when I learned I was going to move, including transport services recommended by my employer.  These companies could not provide detailed answers regarding the shipping process or their support network to ensure Tessa arrived safely and on time.  PetRelocation was able to provide all these answers and followed up with calls and emails to ensure I was up-to-date and comfortable with the entire process. 

--

Great story and excellent advice! Want to know more? Read about other pets we've moved and please contact us if you'd like some assistance making your own relocation an incredible experience.

Can Rabbits Travel to Japan?

Monday, July 28, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Emma
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Rabbit
Pet Breed: Holland Lop
From: United States
To: Japan

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I can't find any information on moving my bunny from the US to Japan, including whatever regulations they may have. Please help!

Thanks,

Emma

 

Hi Emma,

Thank you for your question! When seeking out pet import requirements for various countries it's often helpful to look at official government sites such as the USDA or the Ministry of Agriculture for the country of import.

In this case it looks like Japan's pet import information can be found on the Animal Quarantine Service page, and there is an overview of rabbit travel requirements specifically. You'll find here that you'll need an official health certificate, and upon arrival your rabbit will undergo a one-day quarantine inspection. Here's a link to a few frequently asked questions about importing rabbits into Japan.

Hope this helps! Please let us know if you think you'd like some help arranging your move. We've assisted with several rabbit relocations around the world and would be happy to discuss our services with you.

Good luck!
 

U.S. Department of Transportation Expands Airline Reporting Requirements

Thursday, July 17, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Beginning Jan. 1, 2015, more airlines will be required to report incidents involving the loss, injury or death of an animal during transport. This expansion of the current rule is meant to "provide consumers with a fuller picture of an airline's safety record," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx.

Currently just 14 airlines have to adhere to reporting rules, but the expansion will mean that 27 carriers will now be responsible for filing annual reports detailing specific incidents as well as the number of animals carried. The definition of "animal" includes dogs and cats and also covers commercial shipments.

So what are the implications of this? As we told nbcnews.com, greater transparency is a good thing, and hopefully this will inspire every airline to do better when it comes to transporting pets. There are a handful of pet-friendly options out there now (we feel confident flying with a select few carriers, suck as KLM, Lufthansa and United), but it would be heartening and better for everyone to see greater attention paid to pet safety across the board.

Remember, pet travel is actually pretty safe overall, but there is certainly room for improvement. The pet travel industry continues to grow, and it's well past time for airlines offering pet travel options to truly commit to making their services as safe as possible. Greater accountability will help with this, and this new DOT rule is a step in the right direction.

If you'd like to know more, the Department of Transportation issues a monthly Air Travel Consumer Report and makes it publicly available on its website. If you're thinking about moving with a pet and have questions about it, please contact us.

 

pet in cargo

Cargo pet travel. (Photo Credit: Sandy Robins)

 

 

Pet Move of the Month: Wednesday's Journey to New Zealand

Tuesday, July 8, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

wednesday the catThis month's featured pet move is Wednesday, a cool cat we assisted with a move to New Zealand. We featured her several weeks ago in a post about cat crate-training techniques and were also happy to discover that her owners have a blog for her, too.

They were kind enough to share a few more details about what it's like to move a pet to New Zealand (hint: it can be tricky), and now the incredible experience is complete and they're one happy family again -- ready to explore their new home!

What brought about your move to New Zealand?

A great job offer working on Linux computers (and the largest super computer in the Southern Hemisphere) prompted our move, and...it's New Zealand!  We both always hoped to at least visit New Zealand, so when the opportunity came up to move here we just had to take it.

Have you ever moved a pet internationally before this?

No, this was our first time and we were absolutely terrified!

What were some of your initial concerns?

Our move was a bit complicated, we didn't know we were moving until two months before we were scheduled to be on a plane.  Because of waiting periods between shots and when she could be cleared to travel internationally, Wednesday had to stay behind in the States for five months after we had already relocated to New Zealand.  This lead to our biggest concern being if she would remember us at all.  Other fairly large concerns were, "Is this what's best for her?" and "Will the long flight scar her for life?"

What surprised you about the pet travel process?

We were both shocked to discover that the hardest part isn't the move itself, it's getting your pet's paperwork in order prior to the move. The move itself was very smooth, and after they picked her up PetRelocation kept us apprised of where Wednesday was and how she was doing every step of the way. 

 

wednesday with crate

 

How did Wednesday handle the transition?

Honestly, she adjusted more quickly than we did.  I work from home, so the first week she spent glued to my side, cuddling up next to me any time I was sitting down.  After some much needed time together after so many months apart, she easily fell back into her usual routine.  Also, those fears we had about her forgetting us were simply foolish, when Wednesday finally arrived in New Zealand she was purring before we could even get her out of the crate.  She knew exactly who we were and that she was home.

Is New Zealand a pet friendly place to be?

New Zealand is very pet friendly, but in a different way than the States.  Here there are no screens in windows and doors are often left open.  It is not uncommon for a cat to wander into a shop and make themselves at home.  We even had a late night break-in of the feline variety when we first arrived, a neighbour cat sneaked in through an open window and then couldn't figure out how to get back out.  Wednesday is strictly an indoor cat, so this aspect of Kiwi life is something we wish we had known about prior to moving.

It may be different in more remote areas of New Zealand, but here in the city pet shops seem to be in good supply and are often paired with vet and grooming services.  Pet food and cat litter can be awfully pricy, though most stores offer their own home brand for significantly less than Purina or Friskies.

wednesday hiding

 

What advice do you have for people who might be planning a pet move?

First of all, don't panic. The moment you think you might be moving abroad, start looking into what might be required to move your fluffy family member.  Every country has different requirements for importing animals and some of them have lengthy quarantine times, so definitely begin preparing at least six months in advance.

What made you decide to hire help with your move?

Because it is such a long journey, New Zealand actually requires you to use a relocation service to move your pet.  We found out about PetRelocation online and when we contacted them for more information, Heather was friendly and informative; she even stayed on the phone with us when we took Wednesday to her first vet appointment, and we hadn't even officially signed up with PetRelocation.com yet. After that, we knew we didn't need to look any further for relocation services, and we were right.

wednesday sleeping

 

One more thing: you all sent us a photo of Wednesday when she touched down in California and had an overnight stay before continuing on through the journey. That really put us at ease, and something that really wasn't something you had to do.

You just did it, and it made a WORLD of difference.

--

Thanks to Wednesday's caring owners for sharing this story with us! Have an international move coming up? Please contact us if you think you'd like some help.

 

Pet Air Travel to China

Monday, June 16, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Yi
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Cat
Pet Breed: Mixed
From: Berlin, Germany
To: Shanghai, China

Hello There,

I have a pet cat (three years old) that I wish to bring to China from Germany and I have a few questions that I hope you can help me answer:

1. How easy is it to bring a pet to China and will there be a quarantine period? I've read conflicting documents that there's no quarantine for animals coming from the EU, to ones that say that there's a 30-day quarantine period.

2. How easy will it be to bring the cat back to Germany from China? Is there a quarantine period? Should I get a EU pet passport before I fly to China so it's easier for the animal to come back here?

3. What will be the cost (door-to-door or airport-to-airport) to bring the cat from Berlin to Shanghai? I just need a ballpark figure so I can work out the details of the move.

Thank you so much for your help and I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Cheers,

Yi

 

Hi Yi,

It's great to hear from you and we'd be happy to offer some information.

To start, take a look at the pet import requirements for China. Whether or not you face a quarantine primarily depends on the port of entry, and we highly recommend hiring some professional assistance so as to avoid any delays in helping your cat make a smooth transition into the country.

We also recommend choosing a pet friendly airline and working to help get your cat as comfortable in the travel crate as possible. Here are a few helpful pet travel tips to get you started.

If you're looking for door-to-door services we'd be happy to speak to you further and offer a cost estimate, but roughly speaking our charges for a move like this would start at around $2500 USD. If you just want help for part of the move, we recommend checking with IPATA.org or Globy Pet Relocation to find local, knowledgeable agents.

As far as returning to Germany, you can find more information here and here. China is a "third country" so the rules are a little different (and not as easy) as if you were returning from another EU country. That's not to say it's impossible, though (and there isn't a quarantine) -- you'll just need to make sure you follow the guidelines carefully.

Again, please let us know if you'd like some help with any of this, and good luck with everything!
 

Dog Travel to China: Quarantine Questions

Thursday, June 12, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Mark
Number of Pets: One
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Border Collie
From: Not Moving but from USA
To: China


Hello,

I have been asked about coming to China at the end of August with one of my dogs who is actually a service dog for me, but I am going to do a Frisbee dog demonstration and help organize a competition. I have traveled numerous times to Europe and South America and I have no problems. I have done a lot of searches and get different answers --  yes there is a quarantine or no there is not a quarantine... Can you offer any guidance?

Thank you so very much for any help,

Mark
 

Hi Mark,

Thanks for checking in with us. Being an experienced pet traveler is great -- you'll face fewer surprises overall. China is a special case, though, as quarantine rules depend on the port of entry. We highly recommend working with a professional pet transporter of some kind to help you arrange the logistics and ensure that you can avoid any hold-ups.

You're welcome to give us a call or fill out our quote form, and if you want to research all your options you can search for agents via IPATA.org. There is also a service provider called Globy Pet Relocation that works out of China -- they're worth checking out, as well. For your reference, here are the pet import requirements for China.

If you decide to go to China, returning to the United States is a relatively straightforward process. Generally you'll want to double check with the airline to make sure you're doing all that they ask. Typically pets need a vet health certificate for the airline, and if your dog is traveling as a service animal different rules may be in place.

As you can see, traveling to China with a pet requires balancing a lot of variables, but we'd be happy to speak to you about your options if you have more questions. Good luck, and let us know if we can help!

 

Dog Travel Quarantine Questions

Monday, June 23, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Michael
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Siberian Husky puppy
From: Missouri
To: Upstate New York

 

Dear PetRelocation,

Does a dog have to be quarantined if we're going from Missouri to New York?

Thanks,

Michael

 

Hi Michael,

No, there is no quarantine necessary for a dog traveling within the United States (or to the United States from another country, for that matter). Some countries, like Australia, do require a quarantine. If you ever have questions about which countries do and which countries don't, you can check our country specific information page, the USDA animal export regulations, or the Ministry of Agriculture for the country in question.

In the meantime, here is some information that may come in handy for you:

 

Hope this helps! Please contact us if you think you'd like some help arranging your move. Good luck.
 

Pet Travel Story: "Our Sweetest Macaroon"

Wednesday, June 11, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Michiko
Pet's Name: Macaroon
From: Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
To: Hong Kong
 

I cannot thank you enough for how Tobi and Sarah helped us with the move of our Macaroon from Vegas to Hong Kong.

She is a French Bulldog and because of her snub nose most of the airlines won't accept our baby, but luckily Tobi and Sarah helped us out and finally found her the best animal friendly airline. The process was so smooth, well-prepared and organized.

Now we are all relieved and getting ready for our hassle-free relocation. We highly recommend PetRelocation to all who cherish their pets!





 


Flight Decisions for Cat Travel to Canada

Tuesday, June 10, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Chelsey
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Cat
Pet Breed: DMH
From: Western Australia
To: Saskatchewan, Canada

 

Hi,

I am having a difficult time getting clear quotations from pet travel companies. Nothing is clear or itemized. Is is possible to have my cat travel as cargo with me for flying from Australia to Canada (at least two stops so this complicates things) or will I have to send her separately?

I'm assuming having her as my cargo will be cheaper? Who 'prepares' the animal at the airport, do I get to drop her off or does a vet have to prepare the crate from Australia? Will this complicate the exportation/importation process, having myself or a friend having her as cargo?

Thanks!

Chelsey

 

Hi Chelsey,

Thanks for your questions! Pet travel can definitely be confusing if you've never done it before, and we'd be happy to offer some information.

First, take a look at these frequently asked pet travel questions for an idea of how things work. You have some choices to make -- you can handle the move yourself (secure the paperwork, book the flight and check her in at the airport, etc.) or you can hire some assistance, which will cost more but will also remove a lot of the time and stress from the situation. Here are a few reasons why people choose to hire professional help with a pet move.

Also important for you to look at are the pet import requirements for Canada. You will need to visit the vet before you move and secure the correct health documents.

Finally, since it sounds like you're looking for more information about the details of pricing, here is an explanation of why it costs what it does to hire a pet transportation company to help with a move.

This is a lot of information, but feel free to take your time to look over it and then let us know if you have further questions. We arrange door-to-door pet travel services and would be happy to discuss logistics with you and give you an estimate if you're interested. The pets we move travel via cargo and usually aren't on the same flight as the pet owner -- this makes things easier by allowing the pet owner to take care of their own travel details and arrive ahead of their pet if they'd like to.

Hopefully this sets you off in the right direction. Please contact us if you'd like to talk more about your cat's move, and either way good luck with everything!


 

Dog Travel to Australia: How Long Is the Quarantine?

Thursday, June 5, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Renee
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Mixed (Lab/Sharpei)
From: Canada
To: Australia

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I read on your site that 180 days of the 190 quarantine can be completed in the country of origin. Forgive me as I have never moved an animal before, but does that mean she has to go into a quarantine station here for 180 days?? I won't be able to have her at home with me?

Thanks,

Renee

 

Hi Renee,

Thanks for reaching out, we'd be happy to provide some information. While the process to move a dog to Australia does take 190 days when it's all said and done, your dog will only need to stay in a quarantine facility for 10 days, and that occurs at the very end, after she has arrived in Australia. She will be home with you the entire time you're still in Canada.

While you're still in Canada, you'll be preparing your dog for the move by completing various vaccines (which need to be done in a particular order and at particular times), and you'll also want to work on crate-training if necessary. Check the Australia Government website for more information about what steps you'll need to complete.

Hopefully this helps, Renee! We've moved many dogs and cats to Australia and would be happy to talk to you and/or help arrange your move. Just let us know if you're interested in finding out more, and good luck with everything!
 

Pet Travel Through Frankfurt

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 by Pet Travel Center Questions

Name: Jennifer
From: Singapore
To: JFK
Pet: Snickers, Beaglier, 7 years old

Dear PetRelocation,
 
I may be traveling with Snickers from Singapore to New York via Frankfurt. During the layover, does Frankfurt have a place to bring him to relieve himself?
 
Thanks,
Jennifer
 
Hi Jennifer,
 
Thanks for your question. Traveling with a pet through Frankfurt has the potential to be a very streamlined and positive experience thanks to the Lufthansa Animal Lounge.
 
Transiting pets can take advantage of a variety of amenities (including rest areas and bathroom facilities), and having the chance to exit the crate for a bit can make a big difference in terms of overall stress and comfort levels. Whenever it's appropriate, we route our clients through Frankfurt so that they have the opportunity for a top-notch layover.
 
Please take a look at the link above for more details and feel free to review our blog for more general pet travel tips. Also, for your information, here are the pet import requirements for the United States.
 
Hope that helps! Good luck with everything and travel safely.
 



 
 

Service Dog Travel to Australia

Monday, May 19, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Ingrid
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Pug
From: Canada
To: Australia

Hi,
Can I travel with my emotional support animal (in cabin) to Australia? Which airline would you suggest?

Thanks,
Ingrid

 

Hi Ingrid,

Thanks for your question. We typically use Qantas Airlines for our Australia pet moves, and they have explicit rules about pet travel. Service animals are sometimes allowed to travel in cabin, but certain requirements must be met and this is only applicable to particular routes.

Please review the information Qantas has posted on their website regarding service animal travel, and it will probably be a good idea to call and speak to someone directly about your situation. Whenever documentation is required, in this case service dog identification, it's smart to make sure you're on the right track before you book your flight.

Hope this helps! If you decide you'd like some help moving with your dog, please give us a call at 1-877-PET-MOVE or fill out our free quote form.

Thanks again for reaching out, and please let us know if we can of further assistance. Good luck!
 

Don't Fall For A Bird Scam!

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Joseph
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Bird
Pet Breed: Hyacinth Macaw
From: Belgium
To: California

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I saw an ad in the Penny Saver and have some questions about it. The couple said they have a parrot in Belgium and can provide the vaccination paperwork and health certificate. All they ask is that I provide $200 Euro for the flight since they don't have the time to take care of the parrot. They said they are Zoologists and are currently in Belgium doing animal research.

I have a few questions:
1. Do I need to know the person's name when they export the bird?
2. Do they need the Belgian Veterinarian to issue the current health certificate? Please advise if I need to take the risk.

Thanks.
Below is the email from the couple..
---------------------------------------
From: meiway miranda (meiwaymiranda@gmail.com)

Thank you for your email. My wife and I are zoologists and we are currently in Belgium for an intensive program of research on farm animals. we were about to travel out that is why we wanted to give the parrot away to a lovely home here in the US since we do not no much about the people in Belgium and if they are pet lovers.

Plus since we came here, we do not have time to take care of this wonderful parrot (you can not believe it?) The nature of this study is so time consuming that we spend almost all our time outside the home. So I and my wife decided not sell it to you , but all we ask from you is if you are willing to pay for the transportation and delivery of the parrot to you , we will give him to you for free he already has all their travel documents we obtained when we were
coming to Belgium. We have made all necessary inquiries and it will cost 200 euro to transport it from here to you in your home

So if you are good with it, we need you to give us your shipping address, which will include :

Your full name ...............
Your phone number ...........
Zip / City / State ..............
Street / Address ................
and the nearest airport in your area

so with this information, I will take the parrot to the pet delivery company and reserve a flight for him. When that is done, the delivery agency will contact you to confirm the reservation and then they will inform you on how to pay for the flight and once you do that, a flight shall be activated for the parrot. so get back to me with the delivery details, so that I can go and book a flight for the parrot. thanks and waiting to hear from you at your soonest convenience.

 

Hi Joseph,

Thanks for the question. Quite simply: This is a scam. Do not send any money to these supposed zoologists, and cut off all communication with them immediately. They are only trying to take money from you, and they do not have a parrot.

Here is more information about bird scams and what they typically entail. Usually pet scammers of any kind use similar tactics; they often ask simply for transportation fees that are unusually low, and they stress they are "just searching for a good home" for the pet. Their emails tend to be filled with grammatical errors and emotional pleas, as well.

Unfortunately pet scams continue to be pretty common occurrences (we run across them on a regular basis, anyway), so it's important to be educated and to stay wary of buying pets online. Do research to make sure you're dealing with legitimate sources, and better yet, adopt locally instead!

Sorry this happened to you, Joseph. Please contact us if you have any more questions, and stay smart out there, everyone.
 

Australia Pet Quarantine Update: Fee Increase Effective July 1

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

A few weeks ago we reported about the possibility that Australia pet quarantine fees could potentially rise. As it turns out, this initiative was approved and, starting soon, a number of changes will go into effect relating to Post Entry Animal Quarantine (PEAQ) procedures at the facilities, which are located in Sydney and Melbourne.

You can find a full overview of the changes here, but read on for a few of the main ideas:

-The fee increase will take effect on July 1, 2014.

-The new fee will be $149 per pet, per day. (The minimum stay is 10 days.)

-It's been the case for a little while but it's worth restating: owners cannot visit pets during quarantine. It is due to the new, shorter quarantine period that PEAQ made the decision not to allow visits. During quarantine, department staff has pledged to exercise pets and attend to all their basic needs.

-Why are the fees being increased? The Australian Government Department of Agriculture lists three primary reasons:

  • Fees haven't been adjusted since 2009, and since then various quarantine management costs have risen.
  • The program is currently operating in deficit, and in order to meet the government policy of "full cost recovery," fees must be increased.
  • The recent PEAQ policy changes have affected the bottom line of the overall operation, and the increase is meant to serve as a counterbalance.

 

This cost increase probably isn't welcome news to hear, but if you're planning a pet move to Australia it's important to be educated about the new conditions so as to make the process as streamlined as possible.

Please let us know if you have any questions or if you think you'd like some help organizing an upcoming relocation, and please stay in touch for more pet travel updates.

Pet News Round-Up: Heroic Cats & Travel Updates

Friday, May 16, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

See the video of a little boy's hero cat who fought off an attacking dog.

Speaking of high-achieving cats, Millie goes rock climbing with her owner and he says she is the best partner ever.

Exploring the bond between people and animals.

More about the Amtrak pilot program -- would you travel by train with your cat?

Cats and dogs dressed as people (100 years ago).

This journalist took her rescue cat to a pet psychic.

Moving a pet doesn't have to be stressful -- sometimes it's an incredible experience.

 

Have a relaxing weekend, pet lovers!

Travel Road Block: Banned Dog Breeds in Germany

Tuesday, May 13, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Samantha
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Staffordshire Bull Terrier
From: UK
To: Germany

 

Dear PetRelocation,

Please can you tell me if and how I can take my Staffordshire Bull Terrier with me when I move to live in Germany? (Or can you advise me on who to contact to find out?) We will be moving to either Berlin or Wuppertal.

I can't find a definitive answer online.

Thanks,

Samantha

 

Hi Samantha,

Germany has strict and particular rules when it comes to dogs, and over the years various breeds, including Staffordshire Terriers, have been banned from being imported.

That being said, current rules are admittedly confusing and vary from one city to another. It wouldn't hurt to do a little research to find out if policies have changed over the last few months and have yet to be widely discussed online. 

We've heard that Germany may allow some banned breeds (Pit Bulls specifically) as long as they are registered through your local City Hall, so that's something that's worth checking out. We'd suggest calling vets or animal shelters in the area you're thinking of moving to as well as the German Kennel Club and any official government entities, such as the Department of Agriculture. You can also find more information here about various rules and possible exceptions.

Sorry we don't have clearer answers for you at this time, Samantha. As you can see, importing pets can be tricky, and in lieu of relying on online information it's best to check with an official office directly. We did quite a bit of investigation when we moved Stan, a Pit bull, to Europe recently. His owner wanted to go to Denmark but the breed is banned there, so he ended up going to Amsterdam instead.

Good luck with everything, and please let us know if we can be of service to you in the future. Also, feel free to update us if you find out anything definitively, and all you pet travelers who might be reading this, let us know in the comments if you know something for sure that we don't!

 

 

Learn More About The New Detroit Airport Pet Relief Station

Thursday, May 8, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

As the pet industry continues to grow, it can be pretty tough to keep up with all the latest products and services aimed at making life with pets easier and more fun.

For example, last month we discussed Amtrak's pilot pet travel program and various pet projects on Kickstarter, and this week have learned of a few more new developments that will affect pet travelers in particular.

Thanks to the completion of a $75,000 expansion project that includes a new indoor pet relief area, travelers with small dogs and service animals will now have an easier time at the Detroit Metropolitan airport. Only a couple other airports have facilities like this inside the terminal, and this feature can definitely save a lot of time because pets can use the area without leaving security.

Like at the Dulles airport, this relief area has fake grass, a fire hydrant and a rinse/drain system. If you plan to use this one or are wondering about options in other airports, Dog Jaunt has a great rundown of airport pet relief stations around the country (including pictures and reviews of many of them).

 

Detroit Airport Pet Relief Area (AP Photo/Detroit Free Press, Mandi Wright)

 

In other pet travel news especially of interest to international travelers and relocating families, many countries and cities outside the United States are witnessing a shift in cultural perception when it comes to pets. We often hear heartening stories from our clients, and in Dubai, where pets are becoming more and more popular, expats have started a pet taxi service in response to a ban on pets using public transportation. Sounds like things are changing everywhere in regards to where pets are welcome.

Have you come across any exciting pet news lately? Has your pet been able to use an airport relief station? Feel free to send us your tips and thoughts!