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Help Me Move My Pet

Incredible Experiences: Jax & Opie's Journey to New York

Thursday, January 22, 2015 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Dustin
Company: IBM
Pet's Name: Jax and Opie
From: Lincoln, NE
To: Poughkeepsie, NY

The experience we had with PetRelocation was pleasant throughout the entire process. Everyone we interacted with, including the email correspondents and the people who handled the transportation, were very professional and caring.

We even ran into a unique situation due to weather -- my wife and I flew out the day before so we could get settled a little before introducing the cats to our new home. The next day was very cold in the city the cats were being flown out of. The airline actually put an embargo on flying live animals due to the temperature.

jax & opie

I was never in doubt of our cats rejoining us and was relieved by the staff because of their professionalism and sincerity. The cats arrived clean and healthy.

Thanks again PetRelocation, specifically Joe Fraser and Tobi Ditmore, for the pleasant experience.

 

Tips for Safe Pet Air Travel

Tuesday, December 30, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Janeth
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Labrador Retriever
From: Tampa, FL
To: Los Angeles, CA

Hi PetRelocation,

I've been reading some horrible stories about animals dying when they fly, and it doesn't give me any peace of mind about flying anywhere with my pet. I have to fly to California because I'm moving there, but I want to find at least five top airlines that I can trust with my pet. She will be in the cargo area since she is 60 pounds.

What airlines are the best? What things could I do so my dog gets there safely with me?

Thanks,

Janeth

 

Hi Janeth,

Excellent questions! First of all, read this. Though it's common to come across news stories about pet travel mistakes and mishaps, the fact of the matter is that most pets fly safely. When you look at the numbers and realize that there are things you can do to minimize the risks of pet travel, hopefully you'll begin to see the situation a little differently (which will help you start to breathe a little easier).

What are the things you can do to help your dog travel safely? First, work on crate-training. If your dog is comfortable with her crate and even enjoys spending time in it, you'll be off to a great start. Here are a few tips for helping this to become a reality (they apply to both dogs and cats). Second, it's important to choose a pet-friendly airline. We have helped thousands of pets fly safely, and our most frequently-selected airlines include United, KLM and Lufthansa.

It usually helps to read the stories of pet travelers who have gone through this all before, so we recommend taking a look at these PetRelocation client experiences for some insight and education. Finally, here are a few frequently asked pet travel questions that might help you pick up a few tips, as well.

If you think you'd like some expert help carrying out your move, feel free to fill out our online consultation form. We'd be happy to assist you!

Thanks again for reaching out. Hopefully this information sheds light on the more positive realities of pet travel and helps you to plan a safe and low-stress trip. Good luck with everything and let us know if we can be of further assistance!
 

Incredible Experiences: Schneider's Suspenseful Move to Texas!

Monday, December 22, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Tim
Pet's Name: Schneider
From: Prague, Czech Republic
To: Dallas, Texas, USA

"Airline Strikes, Pregnant Wife, Snowy and Icy Roads… What else could go wrong?"

Two weeks ago (December 5th), PetRelocation delivered our furry boy, Schneider, back home to Texas from Prague, Czech Republic. We decided to make the move back to Texas in the early summer, so we explored our options and spoke with Matt at PetRelocation extensively. He can attest to the fact that we were full of questions about every single detail of the move. He gave us the confidence we needed to proceed with PetRelocation.

When it was time, Matt introduced us to a very patient and professional, Vanessa, who took us through the move from vet certificates to delivery. Schneider had his shots and microchip from when we lived in Dallas before and it was all still valid. The paperwork was easy. Vanessa made it clear exactly what we needed to do on our end, gave us examples, and just like Matt, answered a million questions from us.

Getting a kennel was difficult in mainland Europe, so we had to order it from the UK, which was a hassle. One week until the move, we got his fit-to-fly (health) certificate, which gave us plenty of time for his SCHEDULED flight on December 2nd.

Living in Prague, we wanted to keep his flight time to a minimum, so we decided that I would drive him to Frankfurt, Germany so Schneider would have a direct flight to Dallas.


 

On Monday morning, December 1st, my 9-MONTH-PREGNANT wife got a text from her mom that the airline went on strike Monday and Tuesday. This news was not good for stressed out soon-to-be first time parents with a million other things on their mind. The fit-to-fly certificate was at this point 7 days old. Keep in mind that 10 days is the maximum or you need a new health certificate. Knowing that I have to drive to Frankfurt that day, we are immediately on the phone with the agent in Frankfurt and they recommend that we proceed as before; to deliver him as scheduled and he will be well looked after in the Frankfurt airport animal lounge.

To be safe and on top of things, we decided to make a last minute visit to the vet to get a back-up health certificate in case there are further delays. As we return from the vet, my wife says that she needs to go to the hospital for pain. My mother-in-law and sister-in-law are luckily with us, and we head to hospital where they tell us that we will be parents within 36 hours. We needed to get Schneider to Frankfurt so that he would be on a next available flight.

My sister and I drive overnight to Frankfurt, leaving my wife and mother-in-law at the hospital. We deliver Schneider to the lounge early Tuesday morning, and start the drive back during a slight snow and ice storm in Germany assuming he will be on a flight on Wednesday. We make it back to the hospital with 45 minutes to spare before my beautiful baby girl is born.

The airline can’t book him on Wednesday and then it happens again… the airline strikes on Thursday (which would be day 10 for the original health certificate -- luckily we got the back-up). Vanessa is emailing and on the phone with me this entire week and assures me that he will be booked on Friday. His flight is confirmed but delayed. By 2:30 a.m. my time, I’m on video-chat with my mother when they safely deliver our furry child home to her in Texas.

Vanessa kept me up-to-date at every turn and I couldn't have been more grateful for her attention to every detail. If we need to move Schneider again, PetRelocation will be our first call.

Thank you Matt and Vanessa for all that you've done.

Sincerely,
Tim

Nervous Owners, Nervous Pets: Addressing Common Pet Travel Concerns

Thursday, December 11, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Nicole
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dog/Cat
Pet Breed: Shepherd/Boxer mix and Tortoiseshell Cat
From: Portland, OR
To: Buenos Aires, Argentina

 

Dear PetRelocation,

I am considering moving to Argentina or Brazil next year. I will not move without my pets. However, I have heard horror stories of the percentage of dogs that die on airplanes. Can you tell me a bit about your safety measures? Will someone travel with my dog in the cargo area? How are the dogs walked/allowed to go to the bathroom on long flights?

My shepherd/boxer mix has a long snout, so the short snout breathing issue is not a problem. However, if he feels threatened, he will be aggressive. He gets reactive with big dogs (mostly other shepherds) and will chase cats (cannot be with my cat).

My cat gets very carsick, so I imagine a flight wouldn't be great either. She will bite if she is touched in the wrong spot. Can you please advise me on how this move might work and what conditions my pets would be in during their travel?

Thanks!

Nicole

 

Hi Nicole,

These are all great questions! Sad stories about airline mishaps often surface in the news, but when you look at the numbers, you'll see that air travel for pets is actually very safe. Please read more about airline pet travel myths on our blog and in this Yahoo Travel article in which we offered some advice, and you may also want to take a look at this recent infographic put together by Barkpost. 

Essentially, it's very important to choose a pet-friendly airline and to prepare your pets through crate-training, a vet health consultation and a generally healthy lifestyle. You can read more basic pet travel tips here. Pets are not accompanied in the cargo area, but this part of the plane is pressure and temperature controlled and often provides a better and more calm environment than the cabin would. Pet-friendly airlines take care to load pets last before departure and remove them first upon arrival, and they will be transported in temperature-controlled vehicles.

As for pets with possible nervousness issues or behavior quirks, please know that safe travel is perfectly possible for them, as well. When working with a pet-friendly airline, trained professionals will be handling pets during comfort stops and pets will not be interacting with other animals during this time. If your pets flew with United and were routed through Houston, for example, they would be given water and a bathroom break at a safe facility under the care of individuals prepared to handle animals of all temperament.

We often advise our clients to label the travel crates if they'd like airline or airport staff to be aware of any issues; "I'm sometimes aggressive with other dogs" or "I have anxiety around strangers" are common examples. Either way, these issues shouldn't prevent your pets from flying.

Hopefully this information helps to get you started, Nicole. If you're interested in hiring some assistance, one of our PetRelocation Specialists would be happy to discuss your options and concerns with you further. Please fill out our online consultation form at your convenience or feel free to give our office a call at 1-877-PET-MOVE. 

Good luck with everything, and we hope to hear from you!

Not Your Average Pet Travel Question: International Hamster Travel

Monday, December 8, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Janice
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Hamster
Pet Breed: Syrian
From: Israel
To: UK

Hi PetRelocation,

Do I need any special paperwork to transport a little hamster from Israel to the UK? I am traveling on Wednesday and today is Monday. At the very last minute I would like to give my sister's hamster a new home, as she is struggling to take care of him properly and I would love to take him back to the UK with me.

I know that from the EU no special quarantine is required but what about Israel? Also would there be a large cost? Would the hamster be able to travel in the cabin with me in a small carry box? I am flying with EasyJet. Would it be very pricey? Would it be very stressful for him?

Many thanks,

Janice
 

Hi Janice,

Thanks for contacting us! You'll want to check with UK's official government website to find out about pet import rules. Per this site, it appears that hamsters coming from Israel must must undergo a four month quarantine under the Rabies (Dogs, Cats and other Mammals) Order 1974 and also need an import license. Read more about the process here

If moving forward, you would also want to check with the airline directly to find out about their rules regarding the transport of small animals (every airline is different), and you should check with the Israel Department of Agriculture to find out about export permits, procedures, etc.

As you can see, it sounds like moving a hamster to the UK wouldn't be an easy task (especially in such a short time frame). You're welcome to contact us for more info or use IPATA.org to seek out an alternate opinion, however. 

Thanks again for the question, and good luck with everything!

Questions about Ferret Travel to the United States

Monday, November 24, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Stephanie
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Ferret
From: Sasebo, Japan
To: Norfolk, VA

 

Hi PetRelocation,

Hello, I am interested in becoming a ferret owner and I want to make sure that I will be able to transport him once I move from Japan back to the States. We are currently scheduled to move to Norfolk, VA, but not for another year. I was just trying to get an idea of how this would work and if it's possible? Any advice would be much appreciated :)

Thanks so much,

Steph

 

Hi Steph,

First of all, it's very smart to research pet travel well in advance in order to avoid complications, so cheers to you for being proactive!

The United States is one of the more lenient countries when it comes to importing pets, and according to the USDA, there are no official animal health requirements for ferrets coming into the US. That being said, you'll want to check with the airline you're planning to use to find out what they require.

Typically, airlines need to see a vet health certificate stating your pet is healthy and fit to fly, and they will have specific requirements for the travel crate, as well. In addition to double-checking with the airline(s), it might also be helpful to discuss ferret travel with a vet so that you can ask any questions you have relating to health and travel.

Hopefully this helps to get you started! Please contact us if you're interested in finding out more about our services, and good luck with everything. 
 

Moving Pets to South Africa

Thursday, November 20, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Chip
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Labrador/Pit Bull mix
From: Chicago, USA
To: Cape Town, South Africa

Hi PetRelocation,

What is the easiest way to transport my dog to Cape Town? We are moving in early January for at least a year to Cape Town and would hate to leave our dog here. Also, I am disabled and our dog is a service dog, but only 7 months old (will be 9 months at travel date).

Thanks!
Chip
 

Hi Chip,

Thank you for submitting a question to us. We've helped several pets move to South Africa and typically use KLM for their flights, as they area a pet-friendly airline. For an idea of the preparations that will be necessary, take a look at the pet import requirements for South Africa, which you'll need to follow carefully.

Next, here are a few pet travel tips to get you started. Generally speaking, we advise that you start the pet travel process early, talk to your vet about any health concerns you may have, and work on crate-training your dog. If your dog is a certified service animal and you'd like her/him to fly in the cabin with you, contact the airline you'll be flying with to discuss the procedures (here are KLM's animal travel guidelines, for example). We recently discussed typical scenarios for service dog travel on our blog if you'd like to take a look.

If this sounds overwhelming and you think you'd like some help with your move, please fill out our online consultation form. We'd be happy to further assist you, just let us know.

Either way, good luck and have a safe trip!

Air Travel with a Medical Alert Dog

Monday, November 17, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Kathy
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Yorkie
From: Minnesota, USA
To: Prague, Czech Republic

 

Dear PetRelocation,

My husband and I will be relocating to Prague in early December. My husband has a Medical Alert Dog (an 11 lb Yorkie) who travels with him. What are the required forms to enter the Czech Republic?

Thank you,
Kathy
 

Hi Kathy,

Thanks for submitting a question to us, we'd be happy to help with some information.

Please take a look at the pet import requirements for the Czech Republic. Regardless of your pet's status as an assistance dog, you'll need to follow the country's import rules.

We'd also like to draw your attention to these basic pet travel tips and this overview of air travel with a service dog (this post is primarily devoted to designated service animals rather than support animals, but it may have some helpful info for you, too). 

You'll definitely want to contact the airline you're flying with to find out what their specific procedures are when it comes to in-cabin assistance dogs. Different carriers have different rules, and you don't want to encounter any surprises that could cause delays on the day of departure. Lufthansa allows Guide Dogs, Emotional Support and Psychiatric Service dogs to fly free in the cabin, for example, but their website doesn't mention Medical Alert animals (so you'll need to check with them to see if it will be possible to bring your dog in the cabin).

Please contact us if you'd like a consultation with one of our PetRelocation Specialists, and feel free to explore our blog to learn about other pet travel topics of interest.

Hope this helps to get you started, Kathy. Thanks again for reaching out, and good luck with everything!

"Should We Bring Our Dog on Vacation Abroad?"

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Denise
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Lakeland Terrier
From: (Traveling internationally in general)
To: (Traveling internationally in general)

 

Hi PetRelocation,

My husband and I would like to travel abroad on vacation for two weeks to four months with our Lakeland Terrier and wonder the best source of information on how to travel with your dog. Can we take him on the plane with us under certain weight restrictions for an international flight? Do animals get passports?

Thanks,

Denise

 

Hi Denise,

Sure, we'd be happy to help with some information. For general country requirement details, take a look at our resources page or check out the USDA website (assuming you're starting in the United States). To drill down further, it's typically a good idea to contact the Ministry of Agriculture of the country you're interested in for the most up-to-date info about pet import rules there.

Here are a few answers to frequently asked pet travel questions that may help shed light on the pet travel process, as well. In summary, we recommend choosing a pet-friendly airline, asking your vet to do a health check before you go, and teaching your dog to be as comfortable as possible in the travel crate through crate acclimation.

It sounds like your dog may be too large to fly in the cabin with you (typically only small dogs have this choice), so this trip may entail cargo travel. This is a safe option when you choose a pet-friendly carrier like KLM, Lufthansa or British Airways, but it can also be expensive and taxing for your dog to experience multiple times in a short period.

Along with the paperwork and vet visits, you may find that the logistics of bringing your dog with you as you travel to several different places may be more complicated than you first imagined. It definitely makes sense to bring pets along on a permanent move, but often people find that vacationing with a pet just doesn't make sense for them. It might be better to leave your dog with a trusted sitter, instead.

It's up to you, of course, and hopefully the suggestions and links above will help you find your way to the right decision for you and your dog. Let us know if you have more questions, and good luck!

Understanding the New EU Pet Import Rules

Monday, November 10, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Georgina
Number of Pets: 3
Pet Type: 2 dogs and a cat
Pet Breed: Rottweiler, Border Collie & Staffordshire Terrier, Norwegian Forest Cat
From: Canada
To: England

 

Hi PetRelocation,

What do I need to do to prepare my animals to be relocated with me to England? Could you please send me the current requirements, as I don't want my animals to have to deal with being in quarantine.

Thanks,

Georgina

 

Hi Georgina,

Thanks for reaching out -- there are a few upcoming changes to the UK pet import process so your questions are timely.

First, take a look at the official announcement and information regarding the changes to the EU Pet Travel Scheme. Beginning in December of 2014, the rules for incoming pets will be adjusted. The primary difference involves when the pets can fly in relation to the owners (the owner must travel within five days of the pet), and a few other modifications have been made, as well.

These new rules are being closely examined by affected parties, and various pet travel companies and advocates are working hard to educate themselves and manage these new procedures. Anyone who has experience with pet travel knows that these rules could once again be adjusted, but for now it would be best to plan according to these guidelines and consult the help of experts as you move forward.

If you're interested in finding out more about our door-to-door services, please complete our free quote form. You can also keep following our blog for more updates on this matter -- changes are frequent when it comes to pet travel import rules, and we do our best to keep readers updated.

Good luck and happy traveling!
 

International Travel with Older Pets

Monday, October 6, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Yifat
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Mix
From: Israel
To: The Netherlands

 

Hello,

Your website is very useful, thanks!

I have a 10-year-old dog that I will have to fly during January (as cargo). I would like to know how dangerous it can it be for a relatively old dog (this flight will be about 5 hours long), and also how much time the dog is left in the cold between the time the airplane lands and the time we get her?

I am really worried about this so hopefully your answer can help me.

Thank you,

Y

 

Hi Y,

Thanks for reading our site, and thanks for your question!

The most important thing for you to do to ensure a safe flight for your dog is to choose a pet friendly airline. If a carrier has solid procedures that put a high priority on pet health, temperature shouldn't be a big issue (airlines like KLM, United and Lufthansa do not allow animals to be exposed to the elements for any significant amount of time, for example).

Pets should ideally be the last to be loaded onto the plane, the first to be removed upon landing, and they should be transported across the runway in a temperature controlled vehicle. The cargo area is temperature and pressure controlled, also, and if you've helped your dog to become acclimated to the travel crate, the experience will be made even more manageable.

Additionally, here are a few tips for traveling with an older pet. Essentially we recommend talking to your vet before making a decision, and then if you go forward take extra care with hydration and the above-mentioned safety tips.

If you think you'd like to find out more about our door-to-door services, please give us a call or fill out our free quote form. If you'd like to search for agents on your own, we recommend checking the directory available on IPATA.org.

Good luck with everything, and please let us know if we can be of service!


 

Traveling Internationally with Service Dogs

Wednesday, September 24, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

We recently received a question via email asking how to bring a service dog to Australia, and thought it would be a good opportunity to go over a few basic rules and best practices for traveling internationally with an assistance animal.

  • Traveling with service dogs means following different airline procedures for the most part, as airlines often allow pets in the cabin in these instances. Here are the instructions for traveling with a service animal via United and via Lufthansa, for example.
  • Here is an overview of the rules for service dogs for Australia; owners must fill out an application to be approved before they can complete the import steps. Usually pets entering Australia must undergo a 10-day quarantine in an approved quarantine facility, but service dogs can fulfill the quarantine at home with their owners.
  • Be prepared to show official paperwork proving your support animal is legitimate (this will likely be a letter from your medical doctor or mental health professional).
  • Typically service animals need to fit on the floor in front of the passenger chair (and can't sit on the seat), and they travel free of charge.
  • Space can be limited in the cabin, so contact the airline well in advance to tell them you'll be traveling with a service animal.
  • Even though airlines probably won't require that service animals adhere to usual animal rules (traveling in the cargo area, etc.), countries still will. Find out what vaccinations and paperwork will be required for import and allow a few weeks to prepare.
  • Note that carriage can be denied if an animal is loud or acting in a way that disturbs other passengers -- properly trained service animals shouldn't be a problem, but people who bring a noisy Chihuahua along as an emotional support animal may not be accepted to fly.
  • In addition to verifying country import rules, whenever you're planning to travel by air with a service animal it's a good idea to contact the airline directly to find out about the procedures (information isn't always available online and it can sometimes change).

service dog

Photo Credit: www.servicedogproducts.com

 

Need some help? Please contact us to speak to a Specialist!

Will Tomorrow's Lufthansa Strike Affect Pet Travel?

Monday, September 15, 2014 by Pet Friendly Airlines

Update: The planned pilots' strike for 9/16 has been cancelled. Lufthansa flights should be operating smoothly tomorrow.

Lufthansa pilots are planning an eight hour strike on Tuesday, Sept. 16, however the airline has announced that no cancellations are anticipated and pet flights will still take place. Some intercontinental flights will run earlier or later than originally scheduled, but Lufthansa aims to keep delays and irregularities to a minimum.

The strike is set to run from 2 a.m. to 10 a.m. CST, and long-haul flights departing from Frankfurt (Lufthansa's primary hub), will be affected.

Pets flying internationally are often routed through Frankfurt, where they can take advantage of Lufthansa's Animal Lounge. Whenever a delay occurs (due to a strike, weather or other reason), the staff on hand is trained and ready to take good care of pets until they are cleared to move forward to their next destination.

If you or your pet will be flying with Lufthansa tomorrow be sure to check the current schedule carefully, and please contact us if you have any questions.

 

Photo Credit: Reuters/Joe Skipper

U.S. Department of Transportation Expands Airline Reporting Requirements

Thursday, July 17, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Beginning Jan. 1, 2015, more airlines will be required to report incidents involving the loss, injury or death of an animal during transport. This expansion of the current rule is meant to "provide consumers with a fuller picture of an airline's safety record," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx.

Currently just 14 airlines have to adhere to reporting rules, but the expansion will mean that 27 carriers will now be responsible for filing annual reports detailing specific incidents as well as the number of animals carried. The definition of "animal" includes dogs and cats and also covers commercial shipments.

So what are the implications of this? As we told nbcnews.com, greater transparency is a good thing, and hopefully this will inspire every airline to do better when it comes to transporting pets. There are a handful of pet-friendly options out there now (we feel confident flying with a select few carriers, suck as KLM, Lufthansa and United), but it would be heartening and better for everyone to see greater attention paid to pet safety across the board.

Remember, pet travel is actually pretty safe overall, but there is certainly room for improvement. The pet travel industry continues to grow, and it's well past time for airlines offering pet travel options to truly commit to making their services as safe as possible. Greater accountability will help with this, and this new DOT rule is a step in the right direction.

If you'd like to know more, the Department of Transportation issues a monthly Air Travel Consumer Report and makes it publicly available on its website. If you're thinking about moving with a pet and have questions about it, please contact us.

 

pet in cargo

Cargo pet travel. (Photo Credit: Sandy Robins)

 

 

Incredible Experience Spotlight: Jasper's Journey from Texas to Paris

Wednesday, June 25, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Tracey
Pet's Name: Jasper
From: Austin, Texas
To: Paris, France
 

I had no idea where to start in arranging Jasper's move from Austin to Paris. I Googled it and up popped a company called PetRelocation. I noticed they were based in Austin so I gave them a call.

I spoke to Matt, who completely understood all my concerns and assured me that they could handle it. He didn't pressure me and only when I was completely happy with all the information did he pass me on to Anna, who could get into the specific details of the move. She too was terrific, no question was too small or too stupid (and I had many). She sent me suggested timelines, and even when the airline we had chosen stopped flying live animals she worked tirelessly to find a suitable alternative (even discarding certain airlines whose reputation with live animals didn't meet their standards).

Anna liaised with the vet all the way and even made herself available at the appointment times in case of questions by me or the vet. All formalities were taken care of both in the United States and in France, and Jasper was delivered to my door exactly as promised. It really is a "door-to-door" service. Even after Jasper arrived, Anna checked in with me to make sure he was settling in and had no ill effects from the journey.

I would have absolutely no hesitation in recommending this company to anyone who had to move a pet overseas. It is such a stressful time, and for someone to take over every aspect of your pet's move is amazing.

Thank you, PetRelocation.

 

jasper on the stairs

 

jasper by the water

 

Pet Air Travel to China

Monday, June 16, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Yi
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Cat
Pet Breed: Mixed
From: Berlin, Germany
To: Shanghai, China

Hello There,

I have a pet cat (three years old) that I wish to bring to China from Germany and I have a few questions that I hope you can help me answer:

1. How easy is it to bring a pet to China and will there be a quarantine period? I've read conflicting documents that there's no quarantine for animals coming from the EU, to ones that say that there's a 30-day quarantine period.

2. How easy will it be to bring the cat back to Germany from China? Is there a quarantine period? Should I get a EU pet passport before I fly to China so it's easier for the animal to come back here?

3. What will be the cost (door-to-door or airport-to-airport) to bring the cat from Berlin to Shanghai? I just need a ballpark figure so I can work out the details of the move.

Thank you so much for your help and I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Cheers,

Yi

 

Hi Yi,

It's great to hear from you and we'd be happy to offer some information.

To start, take a look at the pet import requirements for China. Whether or not you face a quarantine primarily depends on the port of entry, and we highly recommend hiring some professional assistance so as to avoid any delays in helping your cat make a smooth transition into the country.

We also recommend choosing a pet friendly airline and working to help get your cat as comfortable in the travel crate as possible. Here are a few helpful pet travel tips to get you started.

If you're looking for door-to-door services we'd be happy to speak to you further and offer a cost estimate, but roughly speaking our charges for a move like this would start at around $2500 USD. If you just want help for part of the move, we recommend checking with IPATA.org or Globy Pet Relocation to find local, knowledgeable agents.

As far as returning to Germany, you can find more information here and here. China is a "third country" so the rules are a little different (and not as easy) as if you were returning from another EU country. That's not to say it's impossible, though (and there isn't a quarantine) -- you'll just need to make sure you follow the guidelines carefully.

Again, please let us know if you'd like some help with any of this, and good luck with everything!
 

Flight Decisions for Cat Travel to Canada

Tuesday, June 10, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Chelsey
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Cat
Pet Breed: DMH
From: Western Australia
To: Saskatchewan, Canada

 

Hi,

I am having a difficult time getting clear quotations from pet travel companies. Nothing is clear or itemized. Is is possible to have my cat travel as cargo with me for flying from Australia to Canada (at least two stops so this complicates things) or will I have to send her separately?

I'm assuming having her as my cargo will be cheaper? Who 'prepares' the animal at the airport, do I get to drop her off or does a vet have to prepare the crate from Australia? Will this complicate the exportation/importation process, having myself or a friend having her as cargo?

Thanks!

Chelsey

 

Hi Chelsey,

Thanks for your questions! Pet travel can definitely be confusing if you've never done it before, and we'd be happy to offer some information.

First, take a look at these frequently asked pet travel questions for an idea of how things work. You have some choices to make -- you can handle the move yourself (secure the paperwork, book the flight and check her in at the airport, etc.) or you can hire some assistance, which will cost more but will also remove a lot of the time and stress from the situation. Here are a few reasons why people choose to hire professional help with a pet move.

Also important for you to look at are the pet import requirements for Canada. You will need to visit the vet before you move and secure the correct health documents.

Finally, since it sounds like you're looking for more information about the details of pricing, here is an explanation of why it costs what it does to hire a pet transportation company to help with a move.

This is a lot of information, but feel free to take your time to look over it and then let us know if you have further questions. We arrange door-to-door pet travel services and would be happy to discuss logistics with you and give you an estimate if you're interested. The pets we move travel via cargo and usually aren't on the same flight as the pet owner -- this makes things easier by allowing the pet owner to take care of their own travel details and arrive ahead of their pet if they'd like to.

Hopefully this sets you off in the right direction. Please contact us if you'd like to talk more about your cat's move, and either way good luck with everything!


 

Researching Dog Travel to India

Monday, April 7, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Dr. A.
Number of Pets: One
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Pomeranian
From: Hartford, Connecticut, USA
To: New Delhi, India

 

Dear PetRelocation,

My daughter, who is working in Hartford, CT, wants to send her pet dog permanently to India. Is this possible? How would it work?

Thanks,

Dr. A.

 

Hi Dr. A,

Thanks for your question. Moving pets to India requires quite a bit of careful paperwork and preparation, as the country made changes to their policy last year and now operate with strict rules meant to target animal breeders. Please take a look at this overview of India pet import requirements for an idea of what to expect.

We also recommend double checking with the Ministry of Agriculture to find out about the most current policies, as they could change at any time. As always, we recommend choosing a pet friendly airline and discussing specific procedures and policies with them, as well.

Many people decide to hire pet travel experts to assist with relocations like this, especially if you'd like the dog to fly unaccompanied. If you'd like to find out more about the door-to-door services we offer, please fill out our free quote form or give our office a call. You're also welcome to visit IPATA.org to locate local agents who may assist you.

Good luck with everything, and we hope to hear from you soon.

 

 

Dog and Cat Travel to New Zealand

Monday, December 9, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Erika
Number of Pets: 6
Pet Type: Five dogs and one cat
Pet Breed: Chihuahuas & American Bobtail
From: Midland, Texas, United States
To: Auckland, New Zealand

Dear PetRelocation,

I'm really confused about moving all of my animals to New Zealand. Is there a certain number of animals that I can move? Do I have to wait a certain number of days after all shots before importing them? Really desperate for help!!

Thanks,

Erika

 

Hi Erika,

Here's a good resource for you to check out: it's the official government guide to bringing cats and dogs into New Zealand. Since there are several steps (vaccinations, documents to secure, etc.), it's important to set up a timeline and follow it closely.

You will also need to secure the correct travel crates for your pets and check with the airline about any restrictions they may have. It's likely that, since you have so many pets, they will end up traveling on a couple of different flights. Keep in mind: for most of the pet relocations we arrange, pet owners and pets fly separately (and that's just fine).

If you'd like to find out about the services we offer, please fill out our free quote form. Hopefully these links help to get you started... Be sure to let us know if you have more questions, and good luck with everything!



 

Pets, Actually: Casting Call for Pets Arriving at Heathrow

Friday, December 6, 2013 by Caitlin Moore

We were recently contacted by a British documentary team looking to feature a post-flight pet reunion in their upcoming "Arrivals and Departures" project. We thought it sounded like fun, so we're helping them spread the word!

Here's the casting call:

A new British ITV documentary is following interesting stories of people flying in and out of London Heathrow Airport. We have covered lots of strong departure stories of people emigrating, travelling for work, and those embarking on poignant foreign travel. 

We are now looking for ARRIVAL stories – if you are flying an animal into Heathrow Airport between now and March 2014 please get in touch!

Contact:

fly@walltowall.co.uk
0044 20 3301 8524

If you've always wanted to reenact the opening scene from Love Actually with your pet, now's your time to shine.

Good luck and have fun!