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Help Me Move My Pet

Travel Tips to Help Nervous Cats

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Veronika
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Cat
Pet Breed: Domestic
From: Mexico City, Mexico
To: Budapest, Hungary

 

Dear PetRelocation,

My cats are very nervous, stressed and afraid when transported and I know they shouldn't be sedated during the flight. They are also too big to travel in the passenger cabin. I don't know what the best option is. I am afraid it will be too stressful (long flight plus connecting flight) to move them with me. What should I do?

Thank you,

Veronika
 

Hi Veronika,

Thanks for your questions -- you're not alone in having concerns like these! Many people think it's impossible to move a pet (especially a nervous cat), but there are ways to minimize stress.

  • First, if you decide to go forward with the move, you'll want to help your cats get used to their travel crates as much as possible. Once they can see the crate as a safe and comfortable place to be, they will be much calmer travelers. Here is an overview of our tips for how to crate train a cat.
  • Second, choose a pet friendly airline. This is an extremely important part of minimizing the risks of pet travel, and we often KLM and Lufthansa for European trips due to their pet policies and good safety records.
  • Additionally, talk to your vet, educate yourself as much as possible, and consider hiring professional assistance for your move. All of these things will help to put you into a calmer frame of mind, which will in turn help your cats to feel less anxious.

A final word: we have helped thousands of pets move safely and, again and again, we hear from our customers that the transition is much smoother than they expected it to be. Hopefully this (and the information above) helps you to start your way in the right direction.

Please let us know if you have further questions, and good luck with everything.

 

Service Dog Travel to Australia

Monday, May 19, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Ingrid
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Pug
From: Canada
To: Australia

Hi,
Can I travel with my emotional support animal (in cabin) to Australia? Which airline would you suggest?

Thanks,
Ingrid

 

Hi Ingrid,

Thanks for your question. We typically use Qantas Airlines for our Australia pet moves, and they have explicit rules about pet travel. Service animals are sometimes allowed to travel in cabin, but certain requirements must be met and this is only applicable to particular routes.

Please review the information Qantas has posted on their website regarding service animal travel, and it will probably be a good idea to call and speak to someone directly about your situation. Whenever documentation is required, in this case service dog identification, it's smart to make sure you're on the right track before you book your flight.

Hope this helps! If you decide you'd like some help moving with your dog, please give us a call at 1-877-PET-MOVE or fill out our free quote form.

Thanks again for reaching out, and please let us know if we can of further assistance. Good luck!
 

Domestic Cat Travel Questions

Thursday, May 8, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Cari
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Cat
Pet Breed: Domestic
From: New Hampshire, USA
To: Florida, USA

 

Dear PetRelocation,

My cat is traveling with me in the cabin. Do I need health certificate for this trip?

Thanks,

Cari

 

Hi Cari,

Yes, you will need a health certificate to show the airline that your cat is healthy and fit to fly. It should be issued by your vet within 10 days of your trip.

It's a good idea to have proof of updated rabies and any other basic health paperwork with you whenever you travel with a pet. Often you won't need to show it, but it's worth it to have just in case.

Please take a look at these frequently asked pet travel questions for more information, and just in case it's helpful, here are some ideas for how to crate train your cat. We know that not all felines are excited about traveling, so it never hurts to read over some basic advice about how to handle it smoothly.

Feel free to contact us or peruse our blog if you have more questions. Thanks for reaching out to us, and good luck with everything!
 

Pet News Links Round-Up: Travel Announcements & Pampered Pets

Friday, May 2, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Check out the new pet restroom at the Detroit airport.

Amtrak is testing an in-cabin pet travel program that could roll out nationwide in a few months.

Selling your house? Maybe keep your pets out of sight.

Ikea hacks for pet furniture.

Amazon lists the "most pampered pet cities" in the United States (based on money spent).

Love happy pet relocation stories? Read about the latest #IncredibleExperiences on our blog.

 

Happy Friday!

Amtrak Introduces Pilot Program for In-Cabin Pet Travel

Wednesday, April 30, 2014 by Caitlin Moore

Answering the wishes of many pet owners who dream of more travel options for their four-legged companions, Amtrak will initiate a trial program next week that allows pets to travel in the cabins of select trains.

The program, which includes the Illinois Zephyr and Carl Sandburg trains between Chicago and Quincy, Ill., will run for six months beginning on May 5. If the test run is successful, pet travel options may be expanded nationwide.

Here are a few highlights of the Amtrak carry-on pet pilot program:

  • Passengers will pay $25 for each pet brought on board, and only dogs and cats are allowed.
  • Pets must be secured in travel carriers and stored under the seat (just like in the cabin of an airplane).
  • Pets and carriers should together weigh no more than 20 lbs.
  • Pets must be at least 8 weeks old and have proof of updated vaccines.
  • There will be no comfort breaks for pets on this four-and-a-half hour route.
  • Pets must be "odorless and harmless, not disruptive, and require no attention during travel."

 

Currently service animals are allowed to travel in Amtrak cabins, but this is the first time pets have been permitted to do so. Citizens and legislators around the country have been lobbying for Amtrak to allow pets on board for months, and now travelers will have a chance to prove that a program like this can be successful.

If Amtrak allowed pets on all trains, would you take advantage of that option? Let us know what you think, and stay tuned for more Amtrak pet updates as they develop.

 

A Cat Relocation Story: Dolli's Journey to Japan

Monday, April 14, 2014 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Name: Allison
Pet's Name: Dolli
From: Houston, TX
To: Yokohama, Japan

I couldn't be more pleased with Dolli's move and the excellent support and service I received from Tobi and Sarah.

I was very nervous about putting Dolli though a move of this magnitude. Would she be safe flying as live cargo, would it be better for me to take her myself in the cabin with me? When Japan import requirements required us to leave her behind with a trusted friend for four months in order to avoid a 180 day quarantine upon arrival, my decision was made. I would have to trust a pet relocation company.

Tobi talked me though every step of the process. She made sure the paperwork was in order and she answered all of my questions. And when Dolli's move day finally came, I was so glad that I had Tobi as a support structure to lean on.

Dolli arrived safe and sound. She was in good spirits, her crate was clean and it was immediately obvious that she had been taken good care of by KLM cargo and the staff at the KLM pet hotel in Amsterdam during a layover stop.

PetRelocation did an amazing job coordinating her move!!! I will definitely use them again on our return trip to the US. I am so glad that Dolli is here with us and our family is together again :)





Planning Dog Travel from New Zealand to the United States

Thursday, March 27, 2014 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Ginger
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Fox Terrier
From: Auckland, New Zealand
To: Wisconsin, U.S.A.

 

Dear PetRelocation,

We are relocating to Wisconsin. We are very concerned about our pet traveling in the hold of an aircraft. We would love to be able to fly the shortest distance to a state of America, hence our questions. Is it possible to comply with the requirements for the 5 day or less option OR Airport Release, gather our dog once we land in Honolulu, Depart for a flight to Wisconsin say 2 days later, and being a domestic flight then he will be able to travel with us in the cabin on to Madison, WI?

A lot to digest I know, but we love our dog to bits and given he has to have a rabies shot anyway, if we comply with the Hawaiian Quarantine regulations and go to Hawaii  maybe we could clear quarantine the same day as we arrive, allow ourselves a day or two before departing on to the mainland OR could we leave the same day on a later flight even? Lots to think about but just wondering if this is a possibility at all?

We await your response eagerly.

Kind Regards & thanks,

Ginger ( a U.S. Citizen)

 

Hi Ginger,

Thanks for contacting us with your questions! We know that pet travel -- especially the beginning planning stages -- can be very stressful and filled with uncertainty.

Your plan might work, but it also might add unnecessary complications to your trip. Bringing pets into Hawaii and avoiding quarantine there requires a few more steps than going straight to the mainland United States, where all you need is proof of updated vaccines and a health certificate. You'd need to time it correctly so that your health certificate was valid for the entire trip and also arrange lodging, transportation, etc. for the time you were in Hawaii, which would add a considerable cost to the trip. Again, this could work out fine depending on your circumstances, but after further research you may decide to take a different route.

We have shipped pets between New Zealand and the United States several times, and typically we find that the direct flight from Auckland to San Francisco works well. Pets can then proceed from SFO to their next destination, if there is one.

If you're concerned about cargo travel in general, we invite you to take a look at our blog for an examination of the issue here and here. Though it sounds scary at first, when the right choices are made pet air travel via cargo is very safe. Thousands of pets fly this way each year without incident, and in many ways cargo travel is preferable to flying in the cabin.

You clearly have your dog's best interests in mind, and in light of that we'd be happy to advise you about all your options before you make a decision. Feel free to give our office a call or fill out our free quote form. One of our relocation specialists will be able to offer you more specific advice and suggestions if you'd like -- just let us know.

Either way, hopefully by perusing our blog and website you can better acquaint yourself with the pet travel process and start to feel a little more comfortable about undertaking your journey. Reading a few of our customer experiences and catching up with some frequently asked pet travel questions could be a good start.

We hope to hear from you soon, and good luck with everything!
 

Feeling Nervous about International Cat Air Travel

Thursday, December 5, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Sarah
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Cats
Pet Breed: European Tabby
From: Barcelona, Spain
To: Charlotte, NC, USA

Dear PetRelocation,

I will be moving back to the States soon (I'm an American living in Spain) and need to transport my cats to the States. They were born in Spain and have never been to the US. Most airlines only allow one pet per passenger in the cabin on international flights and I need to transport both of them.

If I transport them in the cargo area, will they die? I've been reading some terrible stories! What are my best options for transporting them? If they travel with me, will I be able to get them through customs, or will I need to have a representative in the first US airport that we land in? We'll have at least one layover to reach our destination (most likely in the US).

I don't mind paying for a transport service if it's not too costly... I just want them to reach the US safely with the least amount of emotional trauma possible.

Thanks in advance!

-Sarah

 

Hi Sarah,

You have some great questions and we'd be happy to offer some advice. First, take a look at the pet import requirements for the United States. This is actually one of the easier countries to bring pets into, as you just need a vet health certificate and proof that the cats are up to date on their rabies vaccines. Some pet owners choose to handle customs clearance themselves while others hire an agent or a pet transport service to assist them.

Regarding pet travel in the cargo area, this is something our company frequently arranges and we've moved thousands of pets safely this way. Hearing about unfortunate incidents in the news regarding pet shipping is extremely disappointing, but it's important to remember that tragedies like this are nowhere near as common as ordinary, uneventful pet transports. These heartbreaking events are often preventable, and operating with expert knowledge is critical.

Not only does our team make use of vast experience and knowledge, we work with pet friendly airlines who have developed strong pet policies over the years. While there are no guarantees in life, we try to ensure that pet travel is undertaken in the safest way possible. Here's a post from our blog about minimizing the risks of pet travel that may help shed light on a few of your concerns.

You're welcome to give our office a call or fill out our free quote form if you're interested in further assistance. It's normal to feel nervous about moving your furry best friends, but remember that you do have choices and resources available to help plan the safest trip possible for them.

Hopefully this helps to get you started. We look forward to hearing from you, and wish you all the best!



 

Dog Travel from the Dominican Republic to Florida

Tuesday, November 26, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Linda
Number of Pets: One
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Pomeranian
From: Dominican Republic
To: Florida

 

Dear PetRelocation,

Archie, our three-year-old dog, flew from the UK to the Dominican Republic in May 2013 with his pet passport and all paperwork was okay.

Now, in April or May 2014, he will fly to Florida. I understand the rabies injection 30 days before and the certificate of good health, but I have other questions:

1. Does he need treatment for screwworm beforehand?
2. He is microchipped with a long number in his passport. I do not have any details on what make of chip that was used. I will try to get this information from my UK vet, but if I can't, how important is this?

If you have any other advice in regards to flying him into Florida I would be grateful. I am hoping to have him in a pet carrier at our feet for the flight.

Thank you,

Linda

 

Hi Linda,

Thanks for the questions, we'd be happy to help. As you review the pet import requirements for the United States, you'll see that in addition to the rabies vaccine and  health certificate, dogs coming from the Dominican Republic also need to show they are free of screwworm. This simply means that the health certificate must state that Archie has been found to be free of screwworm by the vet within five days of departure.

As for the microchip, we do recommend that traveling pets be microchipped but this not actually a requirement for entry into the United States. Please contact the airline you'll be using to find out about their policies regarding pet travel in the cabin and feel free to review these frequently asked pet travel questions to help illuminate the overall process.

Please contact us if you have more questions and think you'd like some assistance with your move. Good luck with everything -- hope you and Archie have a great trip!
 

Traveling with a Special Needs Dog: Scooter's Story

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 by PetRelocation.com Customer

Relocating a healthy pet can take quite a bit of time and effort, so imagine the stress the caretaker of a special needs pet might feel at the beginning of a move.

We've helped to relocate older pets and have assisted a few with minor health concerns, but until recently PetRelocation had never had the chance to meet a dog like Scooter. Born with only two legs, Scooter was blessed to find his way to a loving home as a puppy and last month moved with his family to Malaysia.

Scooter's owner Kim was kind enough to share the story of moving Scooter and their other dog Harley from Texas to Malaysia, and she offers some excellent info about crate training, quarantine, and dealing with the stress of a move. It's a great read for anyone planning to travel with a pet!

Tell us a little bit about Scooter.

He was born from a litter of three puppies, and two out of the three were born with no front legs. My Aunt Sharon, a breeder, informed me about Scooter and his special needs and I told her that I would take him. She agreed to let me have him knowing I would give him the best care. So we took him in and he joined our family with our other hairless, Harley.

The first few months were difficult. Scooter was so tiny and could not move. His back legs were like rubber. In time, after working with him and using popcorn to entice him, he began moving. Soon he would be hopping like a bunny rabbit and walking on his back legs. He grew into a wonderfully happy and healthy guy. Now he is loved everywhere we go and he gets lots of attention.

What were your initial concerns about moving Scooter?

My husband took a job overseas in Malaysia. We were here before a few years back and left the dogs at home. It was heartbreaking for me and I missed them terribly, so this time around I refused to go without my babies. I began to do some research and found PetRelocation online. After speaking with Cara and Tyler I decided I would go for it.

I had a lot of reservations and anxiety, as Malaysia is not a very dog friendly country. As time got closer I became more and more apprehensive about the whole thing. I had fears about the long flight, and wondered if Scooter would be okay. I guess my biggest fear was that since Scooter was special needs they would think he was sick and take him away. Tyler reassured me this was not the case. I have to admit that in the back of my mind It was still a big concern for me.

 

 

What would you say to someone who was getting ready to move a special needs pet?

If you have a special needs pet, do not let that stop you from taking them with you. They are part of the family and you shouldn't leave them behind because of this. Start making the preparations for them early on. PetRelocation will definitely help in making sure you have what you need for your babies.

Tyler called the quarantine ahead of time and let them know about Scooter, so they were expecting him. I highly recommend taking your pet in cabin if you can. There are about three airlines that allow you to take your pet in cabin internationally if they are small. I also started early with using the kennels for the dogs. I went out and bought the kennel that I would be using for them to travel in. At first it wasn't an easy process -- I started putting them in for a couple of minutes and worked my way up to a few hours. I left the kennels open, and before long the dogs would go in there on their own to sleep during the day.

I HIGHLY recommend starting this process early. Take pee pads and pet snacks on the flight. Put pee pads in the kennel in case of an accident. We did have one so it was good we were prepared.

What was the biggest surprise you encountered during this process?

I guess the biggest surprise for me was how well the dogs did on the trip. I worried myself sick about how they would do on the long flight. The actual flying time was about 24 hours and three different flights, so including the 12 hour layover in Frankfurt and Thailand it ended up being about 40 hours of travel time.

They did really well, though. On the flight they whined very little. When they would get a little loud I would take the kennel to the bathroom and take them out and hold them and offer them a pee pad. I am very proud of them and I was truly surprised at how great they did. No one even knew they were there under the seat. They traveled like they had done it 100 times before, not like this was their very first time to ever be on an airplane.

I have to give a shout out to Lufthansa airlines. When I checked in at the airport with the dogs they were very nice and friendly. The agent had me take the dogs out so she could see them and hold them. They all went nuts over the dogs. I told her I was terrified to fly with them and it was their first time. She reassured me that I should never be afraid to fly with a pet on their airlines. I told her I was afraid they would bark and whine. She said if they do no one will hear them because of the sound of the engine. She was right!

 

 

Can you tell us about the arrival and quarantine processes?

Well when we finally arrived in Malaysia 40 hours later, we were all exhausted. I had to go check the dogs into immigration at the baggage claim. The lady at the pet immigration desk was not very friendly. I gave her all my paper work and signed them off. It was VERY difficult to walk away from my babies and leave them in the hands of a stranger.

As I went to my house that night I cried all the way. I could not sleep that night worrying about them. First thing the next morning, I took the one hour ride to quarantine to see my babies. Do not forget to take your passport! I checked in and they told me where the dogs were located. I took the long walk to where they were and was truly relieved when there were my two babies looking out their screen door at me. My heart was overjoyed that they were there and alive and well, and they were just as happy to see me.

The quarantine room they stayed in was big. I went to see them every day except one day. It was very hard walking away from them and leaving them there. The whines and barks always tugged at my heart. The truth is that a week is not bad at all. The quarantine place was pretty good; their room was always clean when I went to see them and they always had a full dish of clean fresh water and food. They took care of their basic needs.

I highly recommend going to see your pets as much as possible if you are able to. Everyone knew who Scooter was. I ran into one of the workers one day, and she told me that when Scooter first came she laid him on a towel and put the food and water right by him. When she came back later to check on him he was in a different spot. She was shocked to know he could move! I thought that was pretty funny. Scooter has no problem getting around for sure :). Although a little scary for us, I want to reassure you that the quarantine will care for your pet. Not like we would, but they will meet their basic needs.

 

 

I was ecstatic the day the boys came home. They are now doing well here in Malaysia and they have adjusted very well to life in a condo. The condo we live in is mostly Japanese; they love dogs and there are lots of dogs here in our condo. I have made many friends here because of the dogs.

Scooter is still the talk of the town. Poor Harley gets left in the cold, LOL. I miss the days of putting the dogs in the car and going here and there -- things are different here for sure. There are some nice doggie hotels to leave them when we travel, though.

Overall I have to say our experience was mostly a positive one. I am thrilled to have my boys here with me and I would do it all over again. Thank you PetRelocation, and I want to give a shout out to Tyler and Cara for making this all possible and making it a pretty smooth transition. I'm happy to have my WHOLE family here together at last.
 

Jamaica's Strict Pet Import Rules

Thursday, November 7, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Claudette
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Hamster
Pet Breed: Female Fancy Hamster
From: Seattle, Washington , USA
To: Montego Bay , Saint James , Jamaica

Dear PetRelocation,

Can I bring my hamster with me to Jamaica?

Thanks,

Claudette

 

Hi Claudette,

Jamaica has very strict rules regarding importing pets. Dogs and cats may only enter from rabies-free countries and birds are not allowed at all. To find out the latest rules regarding hamsters, please contact the Jamaica Ministry of Agriculture (you can find more info here).

According to IATA, Air Jamaica will not transport pets in the cabin, so that's another thing you'll want to check out by calling the airline.

Hopefully it all works out for you, Claudette! Let us know if we can be of further service, and good luck with everything.

 


 

Dog Travel from Germany to the United States

Wednesday, November 6, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Bret
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Westie
From: Germany
To: Nevada, USA

Dear PetRelocation,

My dog has a current rabies vaccine, tag and certificate. We will be flying into Las Vegas with dog in cabin on Condor Airlines. Must I have a health certificate for entry in Nevada for my dog or is the current rabies sufficient?

Thanks,

Bret

 

Hi Bret,

It sounds like you're off to a great start. Take a look at the pet import requirements for the United States to see everything you'll need to consider -- note that you will need an international health certificate issued by your vet within 10 days of travel.

If you have any other questions about pet travel rules or if you need further tips or advice, feel free to contact us or check out our blog for more information.

Thanks for getting in touch with us, and have a great trip!

Pet Travel to the United States

Monday, November 4, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Nicolle
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Chihuahua
From: Panama
To: USA

Dear PetRelocation,

I am moving from Panama to the USA (Louisiana) and traveling with my pet in cabin. What are the requirements for my pet to enter the country and the state of Louisiana without any issues and without having to put her in quarantine? Will there be any fees?

Thanks,

Nicolle

 

Hi Nicolle,

Thanks for the question. You can start planning your trip by taking a look at the pet import requirements for the United States. If you follow them correctly there won't be a quarantine, and primarily you'll just need to focus on making sure your dog is up to date on her rabies vaccine and has a health certificate from your vet.

As far as fees, contact the airline you'll be using to find out what they will charge to bring your dog on board, and keep in mind those vet fees that go along with the requirements mentioned above. If you decide to hire a service like PetRelocation to help with customs clearance and door-to-door delivery, it will be more expensive. You can fill out our free quote form if you'd like to find out more about that.

Hope this helps! The United States isn't as strict as many other countries when it comes to bringing pets in, so as long as you cover these basics, meet all airline requirements and secure the correct travel crate, you should be ready to go.

Let us know if you have more questions, and have a great trip!

 

"Can My Large Dog Fly In-Cabin?"

Wednesday, August 21, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Jennifer
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Soft coated Wheaton/Golden retriever mix
From: US
To: Japan-Tokyo

Hi,

Desperately trying to find a way my dog can ride in the cabin of a plane to relocate to Japan. She is 40 pounds so "too large" by all standards I can find but hoping someone can give me an alternative (service dog, therapy dog, specific airline?). We are too scared for her to fly under the plane in cargo.

Thanks,

Jennifer

 

Hi Jennifer,


This is a common question as many pet owners are not aware of the conditions within airplane cargo holds and are afraid of shipping their pets that way. A 40-pound dog is indeed too large to travel in-cabin on most (if not all) airlines and will have to ride as cargo.

Apart from very small pets, only trained and certified service or support dogs with legitimate documentation are sometimes allowed to accompany their owners in-cabin. If your dog is not a certified assistance dog and you are simply trying to find a way around following pet air travel regulations, you will not be allowed to fly your pet in-cabin. Falsely labeling a pet as a service animal is harmful to the validity of true service animals (and the reputation of owners) if the mislabeled dog misbehaves.

That being said, flying a pet as cargo is very safe and may in fact be more comfortable for your dog. Check out this post where we address questions about flying pets as cargo and another where we disprove myths about shipping pets as cargo. You'll learn that cargo holds are pressurized and climate-controlled, and aren't that different from the conditions in which human passengers fly in the cabin. Assuming you book with a pet-friendly airline (such as United) and that your dog's crate is airline-approved and appropriately-sized, your pet should ride safely and comfortably as cargo on his trip to Japan.

If you have any more questions about pet travel to Japan, be sure to contact us. Thanks for your question and good luck with your move!

Pet Travel Question: Moving a Ferret to the United States

Friday, August 16, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Sandra
Number of Pets: 1
Pet Type: Ferret
From: Copenhagen, Denmark
To: Portland, Oregon

Hi,

I'm having a hard time trying to find what all needs to be done in order for me to bring my little guy back to the States with me, please help with any advice or tips you may have! For example, do I need to have him chipped?

Thanks a million!!!

Sandra

 

Hi Sandra,

You're right to notice that there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there about moving ferrets (but plenty about cats and dogs). According to the USDA, the US Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service currently has no health requirements for the importation of ferrets.

That being said, it is probably best to play it safe and meet the US pet import requirements when bringing your ferret to Portland. These requirements are relatively simple, and all you'll need is proof of a current Rabies vaccination and an International Health Certificate issued by your vet within 10 days of travel. Additionally, we always recommend that owners have their pets microchipped before traveling.

You should be sure to contact your chosen airline directly to make sure they accept ferrets and to confirm whether your pet will be traveling in-cabin or as cargo. You will also need an airline-approved crate for your ferret to be sure that he will travel safely and comfortably.

Moving a pet (especially one that isn't a cat or dog) can be confusing, so if you think you'd like the assistance of a pet shipping specialist, fill out our free quote form. And if you have any more questions about pet transport, be sure to contact us. Thanks for your question and good luck with your move!

Pet News Round-Up: New Developments in Pet Air Travel

Friday, August 9, 2013 by Caitlin Moore

 

Air Canada has been ordered to ensure a five-row buffer zone between pets in the cabin and passengers with pet allergies.

A third of British pet owners now take their pets along on holiday.

Empty nesters are becoming increasingly likely to be pet owners.

Take a look at San Diego Airport's fancy new pet relief station.

Oh good, this exists: a "private-jet, ride-along vet, concierge pet service."

The end of summer pet air travel embargoes is in sight.

A look at pet travel statistics: Only a very small percentage of pets have a negative experience when they fly.

10 pets who inspired songs.

 

Happy Friday, one and all.

Pet Travel Question: Can I Bring More Than One Dog to the US?

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Apisama
Number of Pets: Two
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Yorkie
From: Thailand
To: USA

Hello,

Am I allowed to bring both of my small Yorkie dogs to the USA with me or am I only allowed to bring just one?

Thank you,

Apisama

 

Hi Apisama,

Thanks for your question. You are allowed to bring both of your dogs with you to the United States. That being said, both your dogs might not be able to fly in the cabin of the plane, as many airlines allow only one in-cabin pet per passenger or have limits on how many total pets can fly in-cabin. It's best to contact your airline directly to ask about their pet air travel policies. Luckily, pets can travel safely and comfortably as cargo, so it shouldn't be a problem if they cannot both ride in-cabin.

While you're here, be sure to check out the pet import requirements for the United States. You'll notice that, because Thailand is a country affected by screwworm, your dogs will need health certificates declaring that they were inspected and found free of screwworm within five days of departure. This is in addition to the standard requirements of Rabies vaccine certifications and international health certificates.

If you have any more questions about pet transport, feel free to contact us. Thanks again for your question and good luck with your move!

Pet Travel Question: Finding a Flight for My Pug

Tuesday, July 16, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Mike
Number of Pets: Two
Pet Type: Dog
Pet Breed: Pug & Shih Tzu
From: Ohio
To: Hawaii

Hi,

I'm having a really tough time trying to find a flight for my Pug. The Shih Tzu weighs under 25 lbs so I can fly her in the cabin. As for the Pug, he's closer to 50, and I cant take the chance of having him ride cargo. The Pug is my life, and I'd do whatever I can to move us out there to Hawaii.

Thank you!

Mike
 

Hi Mike,

Flying with Pugs (and other brachycephalic breeds) can be especially challenging, as many airlines have restrictions concerning those breeds. This is due to the delicate nature of snub-nosed breeds' respiratory systems, which can easily become problematic if the dog is stressed or overheated. Because of the risk of breathing difficulties, many airlines won't fly snub-nosed breeds, especially during the summer months.

Because your flight will be domestic, we would normally recommend flying with United Airlines, as they are what we consider to be a pet-friendly airline. However, out of concern for the safety of pets, United has an embargo on flying adult Pugs between May 15 - September 15. The safest option is to wait until the weather gets cooler so that your Pug may safely ride as cargo. However, if you do plan on traveling during the summer, you should call your airline directly to ask about their pet transport policies concerning warm weather and Pugs.

If you think you'd like help moving your dogs to Hawaii and want to learn more about our door-to-door pet shipping services, fill out our free quote form. Additionally, if you have any more questions, don't hesitate to contact us. Thanks for your question and good luck with your move!

Pet Travel Question: Can My Cats Share a Crate?

Monday, July 15, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Kristi
Number of Pets: Two
Pet Type: Cats
Pet Breed: Domestic
From: Germany
To: Washington, USA

Hello!

We will be traveling with out fur babies next month as we relocate back to the States. I was hoping to have them in the cabin with us, but I think that they need to be under the plane simply because they seem a little too cramped in the cabin sized crate. Is there a way for them to fly in the same crate together? I am very worried about them stressing and I think that if they were together it may help a bit.

Thank you!
Kristi

 

Hi Kristi,

Few things are set in stone when it comes to pet air travel, including regulations about shipping two pets in the same crate. Check out this post where we answer the question: Can two pets travel in one crate when flying?. You'll see that it is possible (but not advisable) for your cats to fly in the same crate, assuming that they are of comparable size and weigh less than 30 pounds (14 kg) each.

That being said, many airlines do not allow pets to share a crate. Ultimately, the airline has final say over whether or not your cats will be able to fly together, so call your airline directly and ask them what they allow.

During the summer months especially, airlines' number one concern should be the safety of your pets. Having multiple pets in one crate reduces free space, which means that your kitties might not have enough room for proper ventilation. Because of this and other safety and comfort concerns, we generally avoid shipping multiple pets in a single crate.

Thanks for your question! Should you have any more, feel free to contact us. Good luck with your move!

 

Pet Travel Question: Can My Dogs Fly in the Plane Cabin?

Wednesday, July 10, 2013 by Pet Travel Questions

Name: Doreen
Number of Pets: 2
Pet Type: Dogs
Pet Breed: Wire Fox Terrier
From: Canada
To: Australia

Hi,

Is there any way I can travel with my dogs in the cabin of an airplane from Canada to Australia?

Thanks,

Doreen

 

Hi Doreen,

Thanks for your question. The general rule for pet air travel is that only pets who are small enough to fit into a carrier which can fit under the seat in front of you on a plane are able to fly in the cabin. Only tiny pets (toy dogs, kittens, etc.) meet this size requirement, and the majority of pets end up flying as cargo. Based on the average size of Wire Fox Terriers, it is pretty safe to assume that your dogs will need to ride as cargo, but you should contact your airline just to be certain.

That being said, riding as cargo is quite safe and comfortable for pets, as cargo holds are generally pressurized and climate-controlled just like the cabin. Additionally, flying with a pet-friendly airline (we often use KLM, Lufthansa, and United) ensures that your pets will be handled by specialized professionals and will be loaded onto the plane last and taken off first. Check out our post where we answer questions about flying pets in cargo.

If you have any more questions about moving your dogs to Australia, feel free to contact us. And if you want to learn about our door-to-door pet transport services, be sure to fill out our free quote form. Thanks again for your question and good luck with your move!