Pet Friendly Travel Through Los Angeles - A Q&A with LAX Officials

As part of our Pet Friendly Airport spotlight, we're taking a look at various pet relief areas and airport policies around the country.

Previously we introduced you to LAX, and today we'll be going into a little more depth by asking Katherine Alvarado, a PR representative for the airport, to share a few more details about the Pet Parks.

How many designated pet areas are there at this airport, and what amenities are offered?
There are five animal relief stations. Amenities included water, animal houses, and bags for disposal of waste.

Do you have to leave security to reach these areas?
Yes, the animal relief stations are outside the terminals, curbside in the Lower/Arrivals Level.

How many dogs can use the areas at once? Any restrictions/protocol to follow? Any crowding issues?
There are no occupancy limits. We have not heard of any crowding issues.

Do you have staff members specifically assigned to supervise the pet area?

Are there any future improvements or expansions planned?
Not any relating to animal relief stations at the moment.

LAX pet relief area

In addition to this, we've discovered a few more facts about the pet areas at LAX. According to Larry Rolon, Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA) Coordinator for Disabled Services, "We had two areas, but felt that five would better accommodate the amount of disabled travelers who use LAX.” 

He goes on to say, “Three new relief areas have been added to the existing two, to better assist travelers with disabilities who are accompanied by guide dogs or other assistance animals.” 

“Our staff, with input from LAWA’s Americans with Disabilities Act Citizen’s Advisory Committee and airlines, selected the best possible locations for the relief areas, taking into consideration the limitations of space and pedestrian safety.”

For more updates and information, follow LAX on Twitter and Facebook.

Pet Relief Area - LAX

What do you think, pet travelers? Have you been through LAX? Did these relief areas meet your needs?

Let us know if you have anything to add, and join us tomorrow for another installment of our Pet Friendly Airport series. There's still much more to learn!


PetRelocation Team


Air Travel, Airports, Ask the Experts, News


Cats, Dogs


United States


Add a Comment

By Mariane Garrón on June 10, 2017 at 6:20 am

Hello , i am travel with my cat from China to Central America... long journey is there a cat relief room in the LAX airport Los Angeles Thanks

By on June 12, 2017 at 9:14 am

Hi Mariane, thanks for the question! Above all we recommend using a pet friendly airline (KLM, Lufthansa, and United are our frequent choices). When traveling with one of these carriers, your cat will be allowed a comfort stop/layover offering the chance to eat, use the bathroom, etc. Let us know if you'd like some help arranging your move -- we'd be happy to help make sure your cat has as comfortable a trip as possible.

By Larissa on December 7, 2017 at 9:51 pm

I have a question while we are awaiting for our plane are we able to keep our dog outside on a leash or does the animals have to be in a carry on bag?

By on December 8, 2017 at 11:23 am

Hi Larissa,

Thanks for your question!

It depends on the airport you’re in and is ultimately up to the discretion of the officials there. All airlines require that an in-cabin pet remain in its carrier on the plane, but the flexibility to let your dog out at the gate may vary. I would ask once you arrive in the terminal—someone there would be able to give you a more accurate answer.

You may also want to ask if the airport has any designated pet relief areas so that your pet can stretch his or her legs a little and take a nice break before boarding.

Happy travels!

By easywriter on March 15, 2018 at 11:36 pm

I want to know: How often do they clean the areas? Is there anyone qualified at LAX to double check that all the animals coming in the airport and on being transported in the cabin have ALL their vaccinations include tapeworm, rabies, and bordetella? If not, why? If they do, what training do they give the people doing the check in of the animals to ascertain whether or not their vaccination records are up to date?

Add a Comment

Name is required

Email is required and must be in the format

Comment is required

Back to top